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Correspondence Women's health in Israel

We congratulate The Lancet for its Health in Israel Series, which takes a broad and unprecedented look at Israeli health and health care, and applaud the effort to focus on women's health. We read with interest the Viewpoint by Leeat Granek and colleagues (June 24, 2017, p 2575),1 in which the authors state that the health of women in Israel is affected by the political situation in Israel. Although it might be true, this statement needs more support.
Source: LANCET - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

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