Regulators Say Herbal Supplement Kratom Contains Opioids

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health authorities say an herbal supplement promoted as an alternative pain remedy contains the same chemicals found in opioids, the addictive family of drugs at the center of a national addiction crisis. The Food and Drug Administration analysis, published Tuesday, makes it more likely that the supplement, kratom, could be banned by the federal government. The FDA also said it has identified 44 reports of death involving kratom since 2011, up from 36 reported in November. Sold in various capsules and powders, kratom has gained popularity in the U.S. as a treatment for pain, anxiety and drug dependence. Proponents argue that the substance is safer than opioid painkillers like OxyContin and Vicodin, which have contributed to an epidemic of drug abuse. More than 63,000 Americans died in 2016 from drug overdoses, mostly from opioids. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb reiterated that there are no FDA-approved medical uses for kratom, which is derived from a plant native to Southeast Asia. "Claiming that kratom is benign because it's 'just a plant' is shortsighted and dangerous," Gottlieb said in a statement. "It's an opioid. And it's an opioid that's associated with novel risks because of the variability in how it's being formulated, sold and used recreationally." FDA scientists analyzed the 25 most common chemical compounds in kratom and concluded that they behave like those found in opioids including morphine. Kratom remains legal ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 19 September 2018Source: Neuroscience &Biobehavioral ReviewsAuthor(s): Anita C. Hansson, Gerhard Gründer, Natalie Hirth, Hamid R. Noori, Rainer Spanagel, Wolfgang H. SommerAbstractA major hypothesis in the addiction field suggests deficits in dopamine signaling during abstinence as a driving mechanism for the relapsing course of the disorder. Paradoxically, blockade of mu-opioid receptors (MORs) intended to suppress dopamine release and alcohol reward is a widely used treatment for preventing relapse in alcohol use disorder (AUD). To elucidate this apparent discrepancy, we system...
Source: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Publication date: 19 September 2018Source: Neuron, Volume 99, Issue 6Author(s): Lindsey M. Snyder, Michael C. Chiang, Emanuel Loeza-Alcocer, Yu Omori, Junichi Hachisuka, Tayler D. Sheahan, Jenna R. Gale, Peter C. Adelman, Elizabeth I. Sypek, Stephanie A. Fulton, Robert L. Friedman, Margaret C. Wright, Melissa Giraldo Duque, Yeon Sun Lee, Zeyu Hu, Huizhen Huang, Xiaoyun Cai, Kimberly A. Meerschaert, Vidhya Nagarajan, Toshiro HiraiSummaryPrimary afferents are known to be inhibited by kappa opioid receptor (KOR) signaling. However, the specific types of somatosensory neurons that express KOR remain unclear. Here, using a newl...
Source: Neuron - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
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Source: Neuron - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
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Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: ABC News: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news
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Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Source Type: news
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health authorities say an herbal supplement promoted as an alternative pain remedy contains the same chemicals found in opioids, the addictive family of drugs at the center of a national addiction crisis. The Food and Drug Administration analysis, published Tuesday, makes it more likely that the supplement, kratom, could be banned by the federal government. The FDA also said it has identified 44 reports of death involving kratom since 2011, up from 36 reported in November. Sold in various capsules and powders, kratom has gained popularity in the U.S. as a treatment for pain, anxiety and drug de...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news
(WASHINGTON) — U.S. health authorities say an herbal supplement promoted as an alternative pain remedy contains the same chemicals found in opioids, the addictive family of drugs at the center of a national addiction crisis. The Food and Drug Administration analysis, published Tuesday, makes it more likely that the supplement, kratom, could be banned by the federal government. The FDA also said it has identified 44 reports of death involving kratom since 2011, up from 36 reported in November. Sold in various capsules and powders, kratom has gained popularity in the U.S. as a treatment for pain, anxiety and drug depen...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Addiction APH healthytime onetime Source Type: news
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