Regulators Say Herbal Supplement Kratom Contains Opioids

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health authorities say an herbal supplement promoted as an alternative pain remedy contains the same chemicals found in opioids, the addictive family of drugs at the center of a national addiction crisis. The Food and Drug Administration analysis, published Tuesday, makes it more likely that the supplement, kratom, could be banned by the federal government. The FDA also said it has identified 44 reports of death involving kratom since 2011, up from 36 reported in November. Sold in various capsules and powders, kratom has gained popularity in the U.S. as a treatment for pain, anxiety and drug dependence. Proponents argue that the substance is safer than opioid painkillers like OxyContin and Vicodin, which have contributed to an epidemic of drug abuse. More than 63,000 Americans died in 2016 from drug overdoses, mostly from opioids. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb reiterated that there are no FDA-approved medical uses for kratom, which is derived from a plant native to Southeast Asia. "Claiming that kratom is benign because it's 'just a plant' is shortsighted and dangerous," Gottlieb said in a statement. "It's an opioid. And it's an opioid that's associated with novel risks because of the variability in how it's being formulated, sold and used recreationally." FDA scientists analyzed the 25 most common chemical compounds in kratom and concluded that they behave like those found in opioids including morphine. Kratom remains legal ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

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Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) are joining those from three other organizations on one of the largest family-based childhood obesity studies ever conducted in the hopes of combating what has become a national epidemic.
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: news
DR MICHAEL UJIKI (Evanston, IL): Opioid addiction is an issue, and there is no question that regional anesthesia is better than systemic opioids. So the question is, which type of regional anesthesia is best? Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks have now come under question as possibly better than epidurals. I commend your group for performing a randomized controlled trial, which always requires quite a bit of work, attention to detail, and patience, and I think you are on your way to answering the question.
Source: Journal of the American College of Surgeons - Category: Surgery Tags: Western surgical association article Source Type: research
What's your pain IQ? Find out with our midyear, 12-question assessment.   
Source: ConsultantLive - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Pain Source Type: news
Respiratory Infections with Particular Emphasis on Influenza Virus Activity in Persons Over 14 Years of Age in the Epidemic Season 2016/2017 in Poland. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2018 Jun 20;: Authors: Kowalczyk D, Szymański K, Cieślak K, Hallmann-Szelińska E, Brydak LB Abstract Influenza viruses cause respiratory infections every epidemic season regardless of the patient's age. The aim of this study was to determine the activity of respiratory viruses in the epidemic season 2016/2017 in Poland, with particular emphasis on influenza viruses among people aged over 14. There were 2982 clinical samples tak...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Purpose: To evaluate the progression of patchy atrophy in high myopia using semiautomated software for fundus autofluorescence (FAF) analysis. Methods: The medical records and multimodal imaging of 21 consecutive highly myopic patients with macular chorioretinal patchy atrophy (PA) were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent repeated fundus autofluorescence and spectral domain optical coherence tomography over at least 12 months. Color fundus photography was also performed in a subset of patients. Total atrophy area was measured on FAF images using Region Finder semiautomated software embedded in Spectralis ...
Source: RETINA - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Original Study Source Type: research
Conclusion: Lamellar hole-associated epiretinal proliferation in HM tended to be more widespread and adherent to the posterior hyaloid than in eyes without HM. Visual outcomes after LMH repair in eyes with LHEP and HM are less favorable than eyes with LHEP and without HM, but similar to eyes with HM and without LHEP.
Source: RETINA - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Original Study Source Type: research
Conclusion: A strong clinical suspicion that translates into early vitrectomy plus intravitreal antifungal antibiotics leads to favorable visual and structural outcomes. A long wait till microbiological confirmation to institute antifungal therapy may result in poorer outcome.
Source: RETINA - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Original Study Source Type: research
This study examined visual and anatomical outcomes of pediatric RD undergoing surgical repair at a single university referral center. Methods: A retrospective consecutive case series of patients clinically diagnosed and undergoing surgery for RD between birth and 15 years of age from 2002 to 2013 at a single academic institution. Results: A total of 206 patients (231 eyes) were included in this study, of which 25 (12%) had bilateral RD. Of those patients, 67 (29%) had TRD (retinopathy of prematurity, persistent fetal vasculature, or familial exudative vitreoretinopathy), 51 (22%) had rhegmatogenous retinal detachment...
Source: RETINA - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Original Study Source Type: research
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health authorities say an herbal supplement promoted as an alternative pain remedy contains the same chemicals found in opioids, the addictive family of drugs at the center of a national addiction crisis. The Food and Drug Administration analysis, published Tuesday, makes it more likely that the supplement, kratom, could be banned by the federal government. The FDA also said it has identified 44 reports of death involving kratom since 2011, up from 36 reported in November. Sold in various capsules and powders, kratom has gained popularity in the U.S. as a treatment for pain, anxiety and drug de...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news
(WASHINGTON) — U.S. health authorities say an herbal supplement promoted as an alternative pain remedy contains the same chemicals found in opioids, the addictive family of drugs at the center of a national addiction crisis. The Food and Drug Administration analysis, published Tuesday, makes it more likely that the supplement, kratom, could be banned by the federal government. The FDA also said it has identified 44 reports of death involving kratom since 2011, up from 36 reported in November. Sold in various capsules and powders, kratom has gained popularity in the U.S. as a treatment for pain, anxiety and drug depen...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Addiction APH healthytime onetime Source Type: news
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