Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Eliminating Factor H-Binding Activity of Borrelia burgdorferi CspZ Combined with Virus-Like Particle Conjugation Enhances Its Efficacy as a Lyme Disease Vaccine

Ashley L. Marcinkiewicz, Ilva Lieknina, Svetlana Kotelovica, Xiuli Yang, Peter Kraiczy, Utpal Pal, Yi-Pin Lin, Kaspars Tars
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

Related Links:

Abstract In the United States, the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis, is a vector of seven human pathogens, including those causing Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, babesiosis, Borrelia miyamotoi disease, Powassan virus disease, and ehrlichiosis associated with Ehrlichia muris eauclarensis. In addition to an accelerated rate of discovery of I. scapularis-borne pathogens over the past two decades, the geographic range of the tick, and incidence and range of I. scapularis-borne disease cases, have increased. Despite knowledge of when and where humans are most at risk of exposure to infected ticks, control of I. scapula...
Source: Trends in Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: Trends Parasitol Source Type: research
Lyme borreliosis (LB) is the most common reported tick-borne infection in Europe, and involves transmission of Borrelia by ticks. As long as a vaccine is not available and effective measures for controlling tick ...
Source: BMC Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
Abstract The skin plays an essential role in the transmission of Lyme borreliosis since it is the first interface between the Ixodes tick and the host during the inoculation of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. A better understanding of the inflammatory reaction at this location is key to develop better strategies (e.g., vaccine and diagnosis) to fight this disease. In vitro cell culture of resident skin cells might constitute an approach to decipher the complex interplay between the tick, the pathogen, and the vertebrate host. PMID: 29032555 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Mol Biol Cell - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Methods Mol Biol Source Type: research
In this study, we evaluated two mouse models - the C3H/N and Balb/c strains for susceptibility to infection and ability to transmit the pathogens via tick vector and to reveal the potential interactions between various bacterial tick-borne agents. Our results indicated that the C3H/N and Balb/c mice are well-accepted models of B. afzelii infection. However, they are not suitable for interaction studies with R. helvetica since the animals did not acquire rickettsiemia and do not transmit Rickettsia sp. to feeding ticks. PMID: 28854805 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Acta Virologica - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Acta Virol Source Type: research
Abstract Borrelia burgdorferi can induce Lyme disease. Approved Lyme vaccines for horses are currently not available. In an effort to protect horses, veterinarians are using Lyme vaccines licensed for dogs. However, data to assess the response of horses to, or determine the efficacy of this off-label vaccine use are missing. Here, antibodies against outer surface protein A (OspA), OspC, and OspF were quantified in diagnostic serum submissions from horses with a history of vaccination with canine Lyme vaccines. The results suggested that many horses respond with low and often short-lasting antibody responses. Subse...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
“Doesn’t it typically happen during the summer?” asked a worried lady that had walked into my clinic in November with a growing circular rash on her wrist. She was referring, of course, to Lyme disease, that scourge of outdoor enthusiasts. While the peak season for Lyme disease is indeed summer, the ticks that transmit it are active March through December. And, while this may be off-season for the ticks, it is a good time to catch up on how to stay safe in the not-so-distant spring. What is Lyme disease, and how do you treat it? Lyme disease is caused by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi which is sp...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Source Type: blogs
Introduction: Lyme borreliosis, caused byBorrelia burgdorferisensu stricto in the United States and by severalBorrelia species in Europe and Asia, has a great impact on the health of the global population. There are human vaccines available, such as the outer surface protein A (OspA) vaccine, but still more evidence is needed to verify its function. We investigated the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of adjuvanted or non-adjuvanted vaccines containing protective epitopes fromBorrelia species OspA serotypes in healthy adults.Methodology: Seven electronic databases were searched for clinical trials involving vaccine of ...
Source: The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
This study shows the utility of long read sequencing for full genome assembly of Bbsl genomes, identifies putative genome regions ofB.mayonii that may be linked to clinical manifestation or tissue tropism, and provides a valuable resource for pathogenicity, diagnostic and vaccine studies.
Source: PLoS One - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
Hey, Sugar, pay no attention to the man behind the curtain. Today, the Journal of the American Medical Association dropped an alleged bombshell when it disclosed that the sugar industry lobby influenced research on coronary heart disease by effectively bribing Harvard researchers to promote the theory that dietary fat, and not sugar, causes heart disease. The story is trending on Facebook at this very moment, and the JAMA Facebook post states that "Policymaking committees should consider giving less weight to food industry-funded studies, and include mechanistic and animal studies as well as studies appraising the ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In the 1980s, the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis Say, and rodents were recognized as the principal vector and reservoir hosts of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in the eastern United States, and deer were incriminated as principal hosts for I. scapularis adults. These realizations led to pioneering studies aiming to reduce the risk for transmission of B. burgdorferi to humans by attacking host-seeking ticks with acaricides, interrupting the enzootic transmission cycle by killing immatures infesting rodent reservoirs by means of acaricide-treated nesting material, or reducing deer abundance to suppress...
Source: Journal of Medical Entomology - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
More News: Allergy & Immunology | Borrelia | Lyme Disease | Vaccines