Many breast cancer survivors may die of heart disease, doctors warn

(Reuters Health) - The same advances in breast cancer treatment that have dramatically improved survival in recent years have also left a growing number of women vulnerable to potentially fatal cardiovascular problems, the American Heart Association warns.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

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U.S. and Guatemalan healthcare institutions are collaborating to bring radiation...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Cancer rates rising in lower-income countries Breast cancer on rise in low-income countries Breast cancer risk profiles differ in developing nations Air pollution tied to lung cancer, heart disease WHITIA scores win with Guatemala digital x-ray install
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis with a variety of health conditions appears to prompt drinking cessation in older adults. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 30758044 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Clin Exp Res Source Type: research
HeartFlow this week published the findings of a 1,500-person consumer survey, reporting that just 29% of respondents knew that heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death among adults in the U.S. Half of the survey’s participants said that breast cancer is the leading cause of death among women, rather than heart disease. “We are aiming to raise awareness that heart disease is the leading cause of death for both women and men. It’s not just a man’s disease, as commonly thought,” Dr. Campbell Rogers, HeartFlow’s chief medical officer, said in prepared remarks. “The symptoms for women ...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Cardiovascular Featured Research & Development HeartFlow Source Type: news
As artificial intelligence tools have been invading more or less every area of healthcare, we made a list to keep track of the top smart algorithms aiming for better diagnostics, more sophisticated patient care or further sighted predictions of diseases. Does A.I. beat doctors? Only if you lived under a rock for the last couple of years, could you not have heard about artificial intelligence. Some might have even come across the spread and potential of A.I. in healthcare. Not only smart algorithms themselves but also the hype around A.I. has grown immensely, thus every time a new study about deep learning or machine...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine AI cancer death future Health Healthcare pathology prediction Radiology technology Source Type: blogs
 While depression is a common mental health issue, it’s not even close to being the most common. Listen in to hear our hosts discuss how loneliness can make a person feel unwanted and uncared for – even if they are standing in a crowded room.   SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW “People think you can’t be lonely if you have people in your vicinity.” – Gabe Howard   Highlights From ‘loneliness’ Episode [0:30] Loneliness kills more people than depression. [3:30] Michelle explains loneliness she has experienced. [5:20] Gabe explains loneliness he has experienced. [8:00...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Communication Motivation and Inspiration Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs
In this study, we show that calorie restriction is protective against age-related increases in senescence and microglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in an animal model of aging. Further, these protective effects mitigated age-related decline in neuroblast and neuronal production, and enhanced olfactory memory performance, a behavioral index of neurogenesis in the SVZ. Our results support the concept that calorie restriction might be an effective anti-aging intervention in the context of healthy brain aging. Greater Modest Activity in Late Life Correlates with Lower Incidence of Dementia ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 26 January 2019Source: Practical Radiation OncologyAuthor(s): Frances K. Duane, Paul McGale, Dorthe Brønnum, David J. Cutter, Sarah C. Darby, Marianne Ewertz, Sara Hackett, Per Hall, Ebbe L. Lorenzen, Kazem Rahimi, Zhe Wang, Samantha Warren, Carolyn W. TaylorAbstractBackgroundand Purpose: Incidental cardiac exposure during radiotherapy may cause heart disease. Dose-response relationships for cardiac structures (segments) may show which are most sensitive to radiation. As radiation-related cardiac injury can take years to develop, such studies inevitably need involve women treated u...
Source: Practical Radiation Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Mortality rates for cancer have diminished slowly and steadily over the past few decades. This is a matter of prevention on the one hand and improvements in early detection of cancer on the other. When caught early enough, even comparatively crude approaches to therapy have a decent chance of controlling and eliminating the cancer. This trend will no doubt continue, but the more rapid, more effective progress that we'd like to see will only emerge given the advent of universal cancer therapies, those that strike at mechanisms, such as telomere lengthening, that are shared by many or all cancers. That is a plausible goal fo...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 10 January 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Andrew Reynolds, Jim Mann, John Cummings, Nicola Winter, Evelyn Mete, Lisa Te MorengaSummaryBackgroundPrevious systematic reviews and meta-analyses explaining the relationship between carbohydrate quality and health have usually examined a single marker and a limited number of clinical outcomes. We aimed to more precisely quantify the predictive potential of several markers, to determine which markers are most useful, and to establish an evidence base for quantitative recommendations for intakes of dietary fibre.MethodsWe did a series of systema...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Very often I encounter women who are far more worried about breast cancer than they are about heart disease. But women have a greater risk of dying from heart disease than from all cancers combined. This is true for women of all races and ethnicities. Yet only about 50% of women realize that they are at greater risk from heart disease than from anything else. Currently in the US, three million women are living with breast cancer, which causes one in 31 deaths. Almost 50 million women have cardiovascular disease, which encompasses heart disease and strokes and causes one in three deaths. Here’s what’s reall...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Breast Cancer Exercise and Fitness Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
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