Why More Scientists Are Running For Office in 2018

Getting scientists to become more politically involved has been an ongoing movement this year, with groups like the American Association for the Advancement of Science and American Chemical Society encouraging scientists to voice their opinions and even join protests, like the March for Science in April 2017. Now, hundreds of scientists and STEM professionals are running for public office in 2018, for everything from Senate seats to a spot on the local school board. “I’m not a politician, I’m a doctor,” reads the first line of Dr. Jason Westin‘s bio on his campaign website for Texas’s 7th congressional district seat. Westin, a cancer doctor based in Houston who is challenging Republican John Abney Culberson, decided to run for office after the results of the 2016 election. November 8 is his wife Shannon’s birthday, and that night she was wearing a pantsuit as the couple drank champagne, watching the results. When it became clear their candidate wasn’t going to win, the couple—both oncologists at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston—decided they needed to do more. “We are at a crisis point, and we should have more scientists in office,” says Westin, who is running on a platform to defend science and facts, as well as to influence issues like health care access, science research, and women’s health. “The scientific method is something that — if you’re trained in it — colors ev...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 314 Action CDA climate change EPA evidence-based medicine healthytime jason Westin Mai Khanh Tran onetime public health Science scientists scientists running for office Source Type: news

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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
“Last time I saw all this, I think it’s fair to say, I was at a turning point in my life,” Anthony Bourdain says before embarking into the Borneo jungle. He was not afraid to discuss his long battle with substance use, an issue that millions of Americans struggle with. In fact, recent data shows that annual deaths from opioid misuse have surpassed deaths by car accidents, guns, or breast cancer, highlighting an astoundingly dramatic increase in nationwide substance use disorders. 1, 2 “I have been hardened by the last 10 years. I don’t know what that says about me… but, there it is.&rdq...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Celebrities Depression General Stigma Suicide anthony bourdain bourdain suicide suicide of anthony bourdain Source Type: blogs
In 2016, opioids killed more Americans than breast cancer. The drug overdose epidemic has become one of the most concerning public health issues of recent time, and in an effort to stem the tide, moreg and more patients and doctors are turning to pot over pills.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
AbstractBackgroundThe breast cancer (BC) epidemic is a multifactorial disease attributed to the early twenty-first century: about two million of new cases and half a million deaths are registered annually worldwide. New trends are emerging now: on the one hand, with respect to the geographical BC prevalence and, on the other hand, with respect to the age distribution. Recent statistics demonstrate that young populations are getting more and more affected by BC in both Eastern and Western countries. Therefore, the old rule “the older the age, the higher the BC risk” is getting relativised now. Accumulated eviden...
Source: EPMA Journal - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Elisa Long was 33 years old and new to the UCLA Anderson faculty when her research and her life grimly intersected. Specializing in medical decision making under uncertainty, she routinely studied how to weigh difficult decisions, often in the absence of complete information. Newly diagnosed with breast cancer — she would soon learn that she is also a BRCA1 mutation carrier — Long was confronted with a critical dilemma of her own: How long could she delay prophylactic surgery to remove healthy organs and still avoid further cancer and risk to her life?Up to 65 percent of women with BRCA1 gene mutations and 45 p...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
A person can be considered medically high risk due to their or a family member's medical history. If you are considered medically as high risk, you get popped into the category of give them lots more medical attention and'lovely'tests.Now withthe progress of genomic testing, its no longer a big expensive, rare proposition. However, why do we only test the high risk people? These are the people who already know they are high risk. But that leaves a lot of people who don't know they are high risk and could be. This doesn't make sense. Some new research asks if it wouldn't it make more sense to test more people who aren'...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer cancer prevention genetic testing ovarian cancer Source Type: blogs
Getting scientists to become more politically involved has been an ongoing movement this year, with groups like the American Association for the Advancement of Science and American Chemical Society encouraging scientists to voice their opinions and even join protests, like the March for Science in April 2017. Now, hundreds of scientists and STEM professionals are running for public office in 2018, for everything from Senate seats to a spot on the local school board. “I’m not a politician, I’m a doctor,” reads the first line of Dr. Jason Westin‘s bio on his campaign website for Texas’s 7t...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 314 Action CDA climate change EPA evidence-based medicine healthytime jason Westin Mai Khanh Tran onetime public health Science scientists scientists running for office Source Type: news
Four years after the United States pledged to help the world fight infectious-disease epidemics such as Ebola, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is dramatically downsizing its epidemic prevention activities in 39 out of 49 countries because money is running out, U.S. government officials said. The CDC programs, part of a global health security initiative, train front-line […]Related:Breast cancer treatments can raise risk of heart disease, American Heart Association warnsCDC director resigns because of conflicts over financial interestsSocial egg freezing is a numbers game that many women...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Four years after the United States pledged to help the world fight infectious disease epidemics like Ebola, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is dramatically downsizing its epidemic prevention activities in 39 out of 49 countries because money is running out, U.S. government officials said. The CDC programs, part of an initiative known as […]Related:Breast cancer treatments can raise risk of heart disease, American Heart Association warnsCDC director resigns because of conflicts over financial interestsSocial egg freezing is a numbers game that many women don’t understand
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More than 63,600 lives were lost to drug overdose in 2016, the most lethal year yet of the drug overdose epidemic, according to a new report from the National Center for Health Statistics, part of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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