Learning a language could protect you from Alzheimer's

MRI scans of patients with Alzheimer's showed they retained more of their gray matter in crucial brain areas if they were bilingual, according to researchers at Concordia University in Canada.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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DiscussionWe applied a high-dimensional machine learning approach to estimate a novel AD risk factor for WHIMS-MRI study participants using ADNI data. The GM AD-PS scores showed strong associations with incident cognitive impairment and cross-sectional and longitudinal associations with age, cognitive function, cognitive status and WM SVID volume lending support to the ongoing validation of the GM AD-PS score.
Source: NeuroImage - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
In this study, we present a probabilistic atlas of the thalamic nuclei built using ex vivo brain MRI scans and histological data, as well as the application of the atlas to in vivo MRI segmentation. The atlas was built using manual delineation of 26 thalamic nuclei on the serial histology of 12 whole thalami from six autopsy samples, combined with manual segmentations of the whole thalamus and surrounding structures (caudate, putamen, hippocampus, etc.) made on in vivo brain MR data from 39 subjects. The 3D structure of the histological data and corresponding manual segmentations was recovered using the ex vivo MRI as refe...
Source: NeuroImage - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
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Source: Neurology Today - Category: Neurology Tags: Features Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 August 2018Source: NeuroImage: ClinicalAuthor(s): Annegreet van Opbroek, Hakim C. Achterberg, Meike W. Vernooij, M. Arfan Ikram, Marleen de Bruijne, Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging InitiativeAbstractMany successful approaches in MR brain segmentation use supervised voxel classification, which requires manually labeled training images that are representative of the test images to segment. However, the performance of such methods often deteriorates if training and test images are acquired with different scanners or scanning parameters, since this leads to differences in feature represen...
Source: NeuroImage: Clinical - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
----Study: Brain training games could be used to assess cognitive abilities, replace the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) //SharpBrains___The Use of Mobile Games to Assess Cognitive Function of Elderly with and without Cognitive Impairment (Journal of Alzheimer's Disease):Abstract: In the past few years numerous mobile games have been developed to train the brain. There is a lack of information about the relation between the scores obtained in these games and the cognitive abilities of the patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether or not mobile games can be used to assess cognitive abilities of elderly. Tw...
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: blogs
Publication date: November 2018Source: Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology, Volume 27Author(s): Wei Xu, Changshan WuAbstractBased on national death certificate data during 2000 and 2010, we employed the space-time scan statistic to identify spatiotemporal clusters of dementia mortality in the contiguous United States. Results revealed that, for both Alzheimer's disease and all-cause dementia mortality in the total population, the most likely clusters occurred in the Northeast region, with lower than average relative risk. The most likely excess mortality clusters were in the Pacific Northwest and Ohio River Valley and...
Source: Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
_____ Why diagnosing Alzheimer’s today is so difficult—and how we can do better (Bill Gates): “Alzheimer’s research is a frontier where we can dramatically improve human life—both the lives of people who have the disease and their loved ones. I’m optimistic that we can substantially alter the course of Alzheimer’s if we make progress in several key areas. One of the biggest things we could do right now is develop a reliable, affordable, and accessible diagnostic. The process of getting diagnosed with Alzheimer’s today is less than ideal…First, it can be expensive and i...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness ADDF Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation Alzheimers-research Bill Gates Brain-health cognitive-decline diagnosis diagnostics Diagnostics Accelerator venture philanthropy Source Type: blogs
Follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle and literally hundreds of diseases can be reversed: type 2 diabetes reverts to normal within weeks to months (depending on how much weight needs to be lost to restore insulin sensitivity), fatty liver reverses to normal within a few weeks, skin rashes recede, IBS and acid reflux are gone within days in the majority, high triglycerides plummet, even several forms of kidney disease can reverse. But there are health conditions that, once established, can leave effects that can be irreversible even if the initial causative condition reverses. For example, type 2 diabetes can cause kidney d...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates autoimmune Gliadin gluten gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
In this study, we analyzed FGF21 levels and alterations in the expression of genes encoding components of the FGF21-responsive molecular machinery in adipose tissue from aged individuals so as to ascertain whether altered FGF21 responsiveness that develops with aging jeopardizes human health and/or accelerates metabolic disturbances associated with aging. We studied a cohort of 28 healthy elderly individuals (≥70 years) with no overt signs of metabolic or other pathologies and compared them with a cohort of 35 young healthy controls (≤40 years). Serum FGF21 levels were significantly increased in elderly indiv...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: Stem Cell ResearchAuthor(s): Minna Oksanen, Ida Hyötyläinen, Jenni Voutilainen, Katja A. Puttonen, Riikka H. Hämäläinen, Caroline Graff, Šárka Lehtonen, Jari KoistinahoAbstractA double mutation (KM670/671NL) in amyloid precursor protein gene (APP) is causative for familial Alzheimer's disease and has been shown to increase the total Aβ burden. Here we report the generation and characterization of an iPSC line from a fAD patient carrying APP KM670/671NL. The generated iPSCs retained the mutation, expressed pluripotency marker...
Source: Stem Cell Research - Category: Stem Cells Source Type: research
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