Fetal Alcohol Disorder May Be More Common Than Previously Thought

In a new JAMA study of more than 6,000 first-graders, researchers estimate that between 1.1% and 9.8% of American children have developmental or neurological problems caused by fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs)—a significantly higher number than previous studies have reported. And out of the hundreds of children determined in the study to have FASD, only two had been previously diagnosed. The estimate comes from school-based assessments, family interviews and in-person evaluations of 6- and 7-year-olds in four communities across the country: one in the Midwest, one in the Rocky Mountains, one in the Southeast and one in the Pacific Southwest. Previous studies, which have estimated the rate of FASD to affect just 1% of children, involved smaller groups of people from single communities or from people in doctors’ offices, say the authors of the new study. FASD is an umbrella term for health abnormalities caused by exposure to alcohol in the womb; it includes fetal alcohol syndrome, partial fetal alcohol syndrome and alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder. FASDs are a leading cause of developmental disabilities around the world, and people with these conditions can experience growth deficiencies, facial abnormalities and organ damage. They often have physical, cognitive and social challenges throughout life, and have an increased risk of premature death. Before the current study began, researchers established standardized classification criteria for FAS...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized drinking alcohol while pregnant drinking while pregnant drinking wine while pregnant fetal alcohol effect fetal alcohol spectrum disorder fetal alcohol syndrome fetal alcohol syndrome baby fetal alcohol syndrome definition Source Type: news

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Conclusions:Results provide preliminary evidence that an intervention to reduce supine sleep in late pregnancy may provide maternal and fetal health benefits, with minimal effect on maternal perception of sleep quality and objectively estimated sleep time. Further research to explore relationships between objectively determined maternal sleep position, maternal respiratory indices, and fetal well-being is warranted.Citation:Warland J, Dorrian J, Kember AJ, Phillips C, Borazjani A, Morrison JL, O'Brien LM. Modifying maternal sleep position in late pregnancy through positional therapy: a feasibility study.J Clin Sleep Med. 2...
Source: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM - Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: research
We describe an 8-year-old male with a pathogenicUNC80 mutation, intellectual disability, hypotonia and epilepsy with severe central sleep apnea (213.5 events/h) on polysomnography (PSG). We also describe a 20-month-old female with aKCNJ11 mutation, neonatal diabetes and developmental delay who had severe central sleep apnea (131.1 events/h). Both patients had irregular respiratory patterns during sleep and wakefulness and were placed on empiric bilevel positive airway pressure therapy, which was well tolerated with resolution of abnormal respiratory control and hypercapnia. Patients withUNC80 andKCNJ11 gene mutations may h...
Source: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM - Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: 15 January 2019Source: Personality and Individual Differences, Volume 137Author(s): Sara Himmerich, Holly OrcuttAbstractIndividual reactions following trauma exposure vary, with up to one-third of survivors developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; Kessler, Chiu, Demler, &Walters, 2005). Individuals exposed to trauma have high rates of co-occurring psychiatric disorders, with alcohol abuse among the most common comorbid conditions (Kessler et al., 2005). One factor that may influence this relationship is alcohol expectancies (Hruska &Delahanty, 2012), where individuals who believe that using...
Source: Personality and Individual Differences - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Authors: Watanabe T, Kawai Y, Iwamura A, Maegawa N, Fukushima H, Okuchi K Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in trauma patients. Patients with TBI frequently sustain concomitant injuries in extracranial regions. The effect of severe extracranial injury (SEI) on the outcome of TBI is controversial. For 8 years, we retrospectively enrolled 485 patients with the blunt head injury with head abbreviated injury scale (AIS) ≧ 3. SEI was defined as AIS ≧ 3 injuries in the face, chest, abdomen, and pelvis/extremities. Vital signs and coagulation parameter values were also ex...
Source: Neurologia Medico-Chirurgica - Category: Neurosurgery Tags: Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo) Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Peer mentoring programmes can play an important role in reducing vertical HIV transmission in resource-limited, rural settings by providing participants with education, psychosocial support, and a continuum of care. PMID: 30102134 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Paediatrics and international child health - Category: Pediatrics Tags: Paediatr Int Child Health Source Type: research
DENVER - A disability claimant is entitled to past and future long-term disability benefits because the insurer's termination of benefits was an abuse of discretion because the weight of the evidence supported a finding that the claimant was disabled as a result of West Nile virus, a Colorado federal judge said July 26 (Michael J. Paquin v. Prudential Insurance Company of America, No. 16-02142, D. Colo., 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 125231).
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Disability Insurance Legal News - Category: Medical Law Source Type: news
BALTIMORE - A disability insurer did not abuse its discretion in denying a plan participant's long-term disability benefits claim because the evidence shows that the denial was reasonable and was made after a fair review was conducted, a Maryland federal judge said Aug. 7 (Karin Reidy v. Unum Life Insurance Company of America, No. 16-2926, D. Md., 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 133287).
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Disability Insurance Legal News - Category: Medical Law Source Type: news
Fetal alcohol syndrome occurs in children as a result of alcohol exposure during the mother’s pregnancy. It can cause irreversible brain damage, growth problems and behavior issues. No amount of alcohol is safe to consume during pregnancy but the risk of fetal alcohol syndrome increases with the amount of alcohol consumed during pregnancy. A New York Times Article discuses a new study that shows more children are being diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome than initially realized, affecting 1.1 to 5 percent of children in the US. This is 5 times higher than previously thought, making it just as common as a diagnosis ...
Source: Cord Blood News - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: babies brain development Cord Blood pregnancy Source Type: blogs
One of my challenges in working with patients suffering from addictive illnesses is to help increase their motivation to stick with a long-term recovery plan. This is a significant challenge for many reasons, especially because the disease of addiction affects the brain's ability to value long term recovery. The one exception to this difficulty, in many cases, is when a female patient gets pregnant. I have witnessed women who struggled for years with an addictive illness discover they are pregnant and, when the pregnancy is wanted, are able to make incredible strides in their recovery. They are often able to maintain sobri...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Here are the facts. By Nina Bahadur, SELF Image: Jocelyn Runice for SELF On Feb. 1, the CDC released new guidelines urging women of childbearing age to avoid drinking alcohol unless they are using contraception. This new guideline is designed to prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), which are caused by a fetus being exposed to alcohol in utero. FASD is a 100 percent preventable condition. According to the CDC, more than 3.3 million U.S. women are at risk of exposing a developing fetus to alcohol because they drink, are sexually active, and don't use birth control and are therefore at risk for an unplanned preg...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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