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‘This Is Us’ Finally Revealed How Jack Pearson Died. Here’s What a Doctor Says You Should Know About the Condition

Spoiler alert: Last night on the hit TV show This Is Us, viewers finally learned how one of the main characters, Jack Pearson, dies. After waking in the middle of the night to a fire in his home, the father of three helped his wife and children escape, rescued the family pet and managed to retrieve important family heirlooms from the burning building. But later, at the hospital, Jack went into cardiac arrest as a result of smoke inhalation. “It was catastrophic, and I’m afraid we’ve lost him,” a doctor told Jack’s wife, Rebecca. When relaying Jack’s death to his best friend Miguel, Rebecca later referred to it as “a widowmaker’s heart attack.” Online searches for the phrase spiked more than 5,000% in the hours after the episode that revealed Jack’s death aired, and some viewers took to social media to tell their own stories about loved ones who had died from—or survived—similar incidents. But what exactly is a widowmaker’s heart attack, and was the show’s portrayal accurate? To find out, TIME spoke with Dr. Richard Katz, director of the George Washington University Heart and Vascular Institute. Here’s what he says people should know about heart disease, sudden cardiac arrest and the causes of major heart attacks. What is a widowmaker’s heart attack? When doctors use the term “widowmaker” to refer to a heart attack, they usually aren’t talking about damage caused ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

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The agency adds a new warning about the increased risk for death in patients with heart disease prescribed the antibiotic clarithromycin and recommends considering an alternative when possible.News Alerts
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Alert Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: Wearing kinesio tape for three consecutive days had beneficial effects regarding self-reported clinical outcomes of pain, joint stiffness and function. This emphasizes that kinesio taping might be an adequate conservative treatment for the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis. PMID: 29466081 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation - Category: Sports Medicine Tags: J Sport Rehabil Source Type: research
Children with high-risk neuroblastoma are currently treated with a chimeric monoclonal antibody against GD2 ganglioside (chimeric 14.18). The treatment improves survival but causes transient neuropathic pain-like syndrome. We retrospectively studied 16 children with neuroblastoma receiving GD2 therapy. To manage pain, all patients received morphine via nurse-controlled analgesia or patient-controlled analgesia. Mean daily pain scores ranged from 0 to 5 and all children had a 0 pain score upon discharge. No major side effects were noted, suggesting morphine via nurse-controlled analgesia/patient-controlled analgesia is effe...
Source: Journal of Pediatric Hematology Oncology - Category: Hematology Tags: Online Articles: Clinical and Laboratory Observations Source Type: research
Pain is a clinical hallmark of sickle cell disease (SCD), and is rarely optimally managed. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pain has been effectively delivered through the Internet in other pediatric populations. We tested feasibility and acceptability of an Internet-delivered CBT intervention in 25 adolescents with SCD (64% female, mean age=14.8 y) and their parents randomized to Internet CBT (n=15) or Internet Pain Education (n=10). Participants completed pretreatment/posttreatment measures. Eight dyads completed semistructured interviews to evaluate treatment acceptability. Feasibility indicators included r...
Source: Journal of Pediatric Hematology Oncology - Category: Hematology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Authors: Yang BB, Xiao H, Li XJ, Zheng M Abstract OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of etanercept (ETN) plus methotrexate (MTX) in patients with rhupus without using corticosteroids. METHODS: Twenty rhupus patients [meeting the criteria for both rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)] who had never been treated with corticosteroids, DMARDs, or biological agents with a 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28)>3.2 and lupus nephritis determined from histopathological specimens were enrolled. All patients were treated with MTX plus ETN, and monitored for 24 weeks of treatm...
Source: Discovery Medicine - Category: Research Tags: Discov Med Source Type: research
(MedPage Today) -- Antibiotic appears to raise mortality risk in users with heart disease
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
The impact of marijuana legalization also has been minimal on the risk for fatal overdosing among adult users of opioid pain medications, a separate study team has found.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Authors: PMID: 29466045 [PubMed - in process]
Source: American Journal of Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Tags: Am J Vet Res Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE On the basis of pharmacokinetic parameters for this study, buprenorphine at 0.2 mg/kg may be administered IV every 7 hours or OTM every 4 hours to maintain a target plasma concentration of 1 ng/mL. Further studies are needed to evaluate administration of multiple doses and sedative effects in guinea pigs with signs of pain. PMID: 29466036 [PubMed - in process]
Source: American Journal of Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Tags: Am J Vet Res Source Type: research
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sudden cardiac arrest may not always be so sudden: New research suggests a lot of people may ignore potentially life-saving warning signs hours, days, even a few weeks before they collapse. Cardiac arrest claims about 350,000 U.S. lives a year. It's not a heart attack, but worse: The heart abruptly stops beating, its electrical activity knocked out of rhythm. CPR can buy critical time, but so few patients survive that it's been hard to tell if the longtime medical belief is correct that it's a strike with little or no advance warning. An unusual study that has closely tracked sudden cardiac arrest i...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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