Prostate cancer symptoms: What is the prostate and what does it actually do?

PROSTATE cancer has now overtaken breast cancer as the third biggest cancer killer in the UK, behind lung and bowel cancer. But what is the prostate, and what does it do?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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A video of the very sweet moment a young Tennessee girl learned she was cancer-free has gone viral.
Source: ABC News: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news
Authors: Emmanuel S, Jornayvaz FR Abstract Discovered 20 years ago, Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) 19, and its mouse ortholog FGF15, were the first members of a new subfamily of FGFs able to act as hormones. During fetal life, FGF15/19 is involved in organogenesis, affecting the development of the ear, eye, heart and brain. At adulthood, FGF15/19 is mainly produced by the ileum, acting on the liver to repress hepatic bile acid synthesis and promote postprandial nutrient partitioning. In rodents, pharmacologic doses of FGF19 induce the same anti-obesity and anti-diabetic actions as FGF21, these metabolic effects bei...
Source: Endocrine Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Endocr Rev Source Type: research
STEFAN KARL STEFANSSON, the LazyTown actor that starred as Robbie Rotten, has died after a battle with bile duct cancer. Bile duct cancer symptoms include  itchy skin and weight loss - these are the warning signs to look out for.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Authors: Timmerman C, Taveras L, Huerta S Abstract INTRODUCTION: The standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer includes neoadjuvant chemoradiation with subsequent total mesorectal excision. This approach has shown various degrees of response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation (ranging from complete response to further tumor growth), which have substantial prognostic and therapeutic implications. A total regression of the tumor is a predictor of superior oncologic outcomes compared to partial and non-responders. Further, this concept has opened the possibility of nonoperative strategies for complete responders ...
Source: Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics - Category: Laboratory Medicine Tags: Expert Rev Mol Diagn Source Type: research
Authors: El-Chaer WK, Moraes CF, Nóbrega OT Abstract Although prostate cancer (PCa) is the sixth most common type of neoplasm in the world and the second in prevalence among men (10% of all cases), there is shortage of studies focused on primary prevention of the disorder as well as little understanding on its pathophysiology. Currently, the PCa screening tools are the prostate specific antigen (PSA) dosage conjugated to rectal examination and confirmed by prostate biopsy. Despite the name, the PSA presents reduced specificity, being necessary the identification of new biomarkers that allow an earlier and mo...
Source: Journal of Aging Research - Category: Geriatrics Tags: J Aging Res Source Type: research
Concerns expressed that opportunities to save lives may be missedCancer patients in the UK may not receive enough follow-up after a diagnosis, a new study by researchers in Chicago suggests.The study, presented at the annual American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago, suggests five years of monitoring is insufficient for some cancers and too long for others. The research suggests some NHS patients may receive too few years of follow-up care.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Cancer Cancer research Breast cancer Bowel cancer Cervical cancer Lung cancer Ovarian cancer Pancreas cancer Prostate cancer Health Medical research Science Society UK news Source Type: news
Last night ’s CNN duel between Senators Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz on the future of Obamacare was pretty illuminating for a recent arrival to the United States, with Senator Sanders’ playbook all-too-familiar to those of us from the UK.Sanders wants a single-payer socialized healthcare system in the United States, just as we have in Britain. Any objection to that is met with the claim that you are “leaving people to die.” The only alternatives on offer, you would think, are the U.S. system as it exists now, or the UK system. Sanders did not once acknowledge that the UK structure, which is free at t...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Chelsea German While a “cure for cancer,” is not yet in hand, it is probably not as far away as you think. As an article in yesterday’s Wall Street Journal shows, we are making tremendous strides in the fight against cancer. Let us take a moment to look at the data and rejoice in the many lives saved by medical innovation. We focus on gains made against the top four deadliest cancers: lung cancer, bowel cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. Consider how the lung cancer death rate per 100,000 men has decreased since the 1980s: While the decline is global, the greatest gains can be seen in weal...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusion This opinion piece discusses the evidence related to whether exposure to electrical light night is a health risk. Much of the article considers various experimental studies where small numbers of participants were exposed to different light levels at night, as well as observational studies reportedly linking night-shift work with cancer, including breast and colon cancer. The researchers also identified some studies linking self-reported or measured light in the bedroom with depression and obesity. But this study has two prominent limitations. It does not appear to have been a systematic review. No methods are...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Cancer Source Type: news
The NHS fails to inform patients that health screening often leads to unnecessary and risky treatmentsThere was some good news shortly before the Christmas break: the Parliamentary Science and Technology Committeeannounced an enquiry into health screening.The need for a review is pressing. Screening always sounds good – catch disease early, while it can still be treated – but the reality is more complex and screening has side effects. The problem is that doctors and researchers have known about these downsides of screening for decades, but the message hasn't got through to patients.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Medical research Health Society Science & wellbeing Life and style Breast cancer Bowel cancer Prostate cancer NHS Source Type: news
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