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Weekend Recipe: A Hearty Chicken Soup That ’s Good for Your Soul and Immune System

When I feel a little run down, I make my restorative Polish-style chicken soup called Rosół, which was taught to me by my great-grandmother to help fight colds. When I ate her soup, I could instantly feel its healing effects and it just made me feel good all over. Chicken soup is simply a protein-rich meat stock, infused with a mirepoix of vegetables such as carrots, onion and leek. After simmering for 1 ½ to 2 hours, you end up with a golden elixir that’s filled with nutrients from the organic chicken meat and vegetables that you’ve used. It can be sipped all day, or made into a more substantial meal by serving it with noodles or rice — which is something my great-grandmother routinely did. Don’t be scared off by the amount of garlic in the recipe. After a few minutes the flavor will infuse the stock and give it richness and density. This soup, from my cookbook Purely Delicious, works for me every time I feel a cold coming on and you just feel amazing when eating it. WHAT’S GREAT ABOUT IT Studies suggest that chicken soup may contain beneficial, anti-inflammatory compounds that may ease the symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections. INGREDIENTS 1 kg (2.2 LBS) organic chicken thighs 3 litres (6 pints) filtered water 2 carrots, roughly chopped 2 onions, peeled and quartered 2 sticks celery, roughly chopped 6 cloves garlic, smashed 2 tablespoon finely grated ginger 2 tablespoons fresh grated turmeric 6 spring onions, thinly sl...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Food healthytime Recipes Teresa Cutter The Healthy Chef Source Type: news

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