Simple tips to improve your heart health

Heart disease sometimes is difficult to diagnose. Many people don ’t know they have a problem until the day they have a heart attack. Sometimes they don’t recognize the symptoms of heart disease, such as chest pain (which they think is indigestion), shortness of breath, nausea, irregular heartbeats and fatigue. These symptoms can be subtle, for example, peopl e just feel they are getting older and can’t play golf and tennis like they used to. They have slowed down so that they use the golf cart…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: news

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Gun deaths in the U.S. have reached a record high, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). According to the research, 39,773 people were fatally shot in 2017, a figure that has grown by more than 10,000 people since 1999. CDC data going back to 1979 shows that last year had the highest rates of gun deaths in nearly 40 years. The new data comes as a community in Newtown, Conn. reckons with the sixth anniversary of the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, during which 20 children and six adults died. Tim Makris, co-founder and managing director of Sandy Hook Promise, a group...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Guns onetime public health Source Type: news
Federal prosecutors have charged six Detroit-area physicians with fraudulent billing in connection with a scheme to hook patients on opioids and then force them to undergo unnecessary procedures.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news
EMA review finds omega-3 fatty acid medicines are not effective for secondary prevention after myocardial infarction and rules they should no longer be authorized for such use.News Alerts
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Alert Source Type: news
Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Vascular Surgery: Venous and Lymphatic Disorders, Volume 7, Issue 1Author(s): Fedor Lurie, Brajesh K. Lal, Pier Luigi Antignani, John Blebea, Ruth Bush, Joseph Caprini, Alun Davies, Mark Forrestal, Glenn Jacobowitz, Evi Kalodiki, Lois Killewich, Joann Lohr, Harry Ma, Giovanni Mosti, Hugo Partsch, Thom Rooke, Thomas WakefieldSummaryGuideline 1.1: Compression after thermal ablation or stripping of the saphenous veins.When possible, we suggest compression (elastic stockings or wraps) should be used after surgical or thermal procedures to eliminate varicose veins. [GRADE - 2; LE...
Source: Journal of Vascular Surgery: Venous and Lymphatic Disorders - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 December 2018Source: The Journal of Foot and Ankle SurgeryAuthor(s): Anthony Tickner, Seiha Thorng, Mary Martin, Valerie MarmolejoAbstractRupture of the tibialis anterior tendon is a rare condition reported to occur most often spontaneously in patients>45 years of age. Diagnosis is often delayed due to transient pain at the time of rupture and the ability of the long extensors to compensate for the lost action of the tibialis anterior. Treatment has been proposed to be based on the activity level of the individual; however, no consensus has been reached on the optimal treatment moda...
Source: The Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2019Source: The Lancet Neurology, Volume 18, Issue 1Author(s): Nadine Attal, Didier Bouhassira
Source: The Lancet Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Taking a low-dose aspirin every day has long been known to cut the chances of another heart attack, stroke or other heart problem in people who already have had one, but the risks don’t outweigh the benefits for most other folks, major new research finds. Although it’s been used for more than a century, aspirin’s value in many situations is still unclear. The latest studies are some of the largest and longest to test this pennies-a-day blood thinner in people who don’t yet have heart disease or a blood vessel-related problem. One found that aspirin did not help prevent first strokes or heart attacks...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch aspirin Source Type: news
Almost 30% of women who had a heart attack in a new study sought medical care for related symptoms before they ever went to the hospital — but more than half of their doctors didn’t think their ailments were heart-related. The reason why so many women are falling through the cracks may have to do with the variety of heart-attack symptoms that women experience, according to the paper published in the journal Circulation. Researchers from the Yale School of Public Health interviewed almost 3,000 heart attack patients younger than 55 — two-thirds of them female — about their symptoms, when they sought ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime heart attacks Heart Disease medicine onetime Research Source Type: news
Spoiler alert: Last night on the hit TV show This Is Us, viewers finally learned how one of the main characters, Jack Pearson, dies. After waking in the middle of the night to a fire in his home, the father of three helped his wife and children escape, rescued the family pet and managed to retrieve important family heirlooms from the burning building. But later, at the hospital, Jack went into cardiac arrest as a result of smoke inhalation. “It was catastrophic, and I’m afraid we’ve lost him,” a doctor told Jack’s wife, Rebecca. When relaying Jack’s death to his best friend Miguel, Rebec...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sudden cardiac arrest may not always be so sudden: New research suggests a lot of people may ignore potentially life-saving warning signs hours, days, even a few weeks before they collapse. Cardiac arrest claims about 350,000 U.S. lives a year. It's not a heart attack, but worse: The heart abruptly stops beating, its electrical activity knocked out of rhythm. CPR can buy critical time, but so few patients survive that it's been hard to tell if the longtime medical belief is correct that it's a strike with little or no advance warning. An unusual study that has closely tracked sudden cardiac arrest i...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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