Pro Football Players May Die Earlier Than Their Peers, Study Says

The professional football industry has been rocked by plenty of bad press in recent years, from domestic violence charges to studies linking the sport to chronic brain injury. Now, just ahead of this weekend’s Super Bowl, a new study casts another shadow over the game: Career players in the National Football League (NFL) have slightly higher rates of early death than their peers who didn’t play professionally, according to a report published in JAMA. The difference in mortality rate between NFL players and non-NFL players was not statistically significant, meaning that the total number of deaths in the study was too low to rule out that the results could be due to chance. But the study authors say the findings are still concerning, and that scientists should continue tracking football players after retirement to see if stronger links can be found. The new study stands in contrast to previous research suggesting that football players live longer than members of the general public. On one hand, those previous findings make sense, says Dr. Atheendar Venkataramani, lead author of the new study and assistant professor of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine. Professional athletes spend their careers in top physical shape and get plenty of exercise, and even after retirement, they often have the money and resources to stay fit. They also get the best health care. But playing football has also been linke...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized chronic traumatic encephalopathy concussions cte football players football cte study football injuries football safety healthytime is football dangerous is football safe onetime Research why is football dangerous Source Type: news

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Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the motor pathways, invariably leading to death within a few years of onset. Most cases of ALS are sporadic, but familial forms of the disease (FALS) constitute 10% of the cases. Since the first identification of a causative gene in the 1990s and with recent advances in genetics, more than twenty genes have now been linked to FALS. This increased number of genes led to a tremendous amount of research, clearly contributed to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disorder, and paved the way for the development of new therapeutics and new h...
Source: Journal of the Neurological Sciences - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
ron;imić G Abstract Two clinically distinct diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), have recently been classified as two extremes of the FTD/ALS spectrum. The neuropathological correlate of FTD is frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), characterized by tau-, TDP-43-, and FUS-immunoreactive neuronal inclusions. An earlier discovery that a hexanucleotide repeat expansion mutation in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene causes ALS and FTD established a special subtype of ALS and FTLD with TDP-43 pathology (C9FTD/ALS). Normal individuals carry 2-10 hexanucleoti...
Source: Behavioural Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Behav Neurol Source Type: research
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Source: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Neurochemistry - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injections into the parotid and submandibular glands seem to be a safe and effective therapy for the treatment of drooling. Further long-term prospective studies with varying doses are warranted. PMID: 30772963 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The Israel Medical Association Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: Isr Med Assoc J Source Type: research
AbstractHereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders. Numerous genes linked to HSPs, overlapping phenotypes between HSP subtypes and other neurodegenerative disorders and the HSPs ’ dual mode of inheritance (both dominant and recessive) make the genetic diagnosis of HSPs complex and difficult. Out of the original HSP cohort comprising 306 index cases (familial and isolated) who had been tested according to “traditional workflow/guidelines” by Multiplex Ligation-dependen t Probe Amplification (MLPA) and Sanger sequencing, 30 unrelated patien...
Source: Neurogenetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal and rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disease without effective treatment. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and the toll-like receptor ...
Source: Journal of Neuroinflammation - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Condition:   Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Intervention:   Drug: Gold Nanocrystals Sponsors:   Clene Nanomedicine;   University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
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