American College of Cardiology Foundation/Merck Research Fellowships in Cardiovascular Disease and Cardiometabolic Disorders

American College of Cardiology Foundation/Merck Research Fellowships in Cardiovascular Disease and Cardiometabolic Disorders Deadline: September 22, 2014 Four one-year fellowships will be awarded to support research in adult cardiology. Preference is given to individuals who have had no more than two years of prior full-time experience either in clinical or basic research. Recipients will be expected to pursue a full-time project in clinical research during their year of supported training. Research Focus: In selecting applications, proposals addressing CVD and Cardiometabolic disorders are encouraged. Included are proposals that address pathophysiology, molecular genetics, metabolic abnormalities leading to cardiovascular disease, hypertension, heart failure, hyperlipidemia, inflammatory mechanisms and new pathways for drug discovery. Proposals focusing on clinically relevant outcomes as a result of the metabolic syndrome, diabetes or obesity are also encouraged. Outcomes studies should focus on clinical/and or systems of care (e.g., quality improvement) interventions, and use outcomes measures of importance to both patients and society, including mortality, significant morbidity or quality of life changes, or economic effects. Preference for one award will be given to applicants focusing on disparities of care.  Despite increased attention to health disparities at the national, state and community levels, relatively little progress has been made in achieving th...
Source: ScanGrants feed - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: funding

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This study provides direct evidence for the contribution of gut microbiota to the cognitive decline during normal aging and suggests that restoring microbiota homeostasis in the elderly may improve cognitive function. On Nutraceutical Senolytics https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/05/on-nutraceutical-senolytics/ Nutraceuticals are compounds derived from foods, usually plants. In principle one can find useful therapies in the natural world, taking the approach of identifying interesting molecules and refining them to a greater potency than naturally occurs in order to produce a usefully large therape...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The metabolic syndrome and associated comorbidities, like diabetes, hypertension and obesity, have been implicated in the development of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The molecular mechanisms underlying the development of HFpEF remain to be elucidated. We developed a cardiome-directed network analysis and applied this to high throughput cardiac RNA-sequencing data from a well-established rat model of HFpEF, the obese and hypertensive ZSF1 rat. With this novel system biology approach, we explored the mechanisms underlying HFpEF.
Source: Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology - Category: Cytology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest a potential use of treprostinil as an early treatment for mild metabolic syndrome-associated PH-HFpEF and that combined treatment with treprostinil and metformin may improve hyperglycemia and cardiac function in a more severe disease. PMID: 32268788 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol Source Type: research
AbstractConclusive evidence demonstrates that the sympathetic nervous system activation is a hallmark of congestive heart failure. This has been shown via a variety of biochemical, neurophysiological, and neuroimaging approaches for studying human sympathetic neural function. The sympathetic activation appears to be an early phenomenon in the clinical course of the disease, closely related to its severity and potentiated by the concomitant presence of other comorbidities, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and renal failure. The adrenergic overdrive in heart failure is associated with oth...
Source: Heart Failure Reviews - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Authors: Sanches E, Timmermans M, Topal B, Celik A, Sundbom M, Ribeiro R, Parmar C, Ugale S, Proczko M, Stepaniak PS, Pujol Rafols J, Mahawar K, Buise MP, Neimark A, Severin R, Pouwels S Abstract Introduction: Obesity is associated with various diseases such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular diseases. It affects several organ systems, including the pulmonary and cardiac systems. Furthermore, it induces pulmonary and cardiac changes that can result in right and/or left heart failure.Areas covered: In this review, authors provide an overv...
Source: Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy - Category: Cardiology Tags: Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther Source Type: research
Abstract Introduction: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is defined as an association between diabetes, hypertension, obesity and dyslipidemia and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Mitral annular calcification (MAC) is associated with several cardiovascular disorders, including coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation (AF), heart failure, ischemic stroke and increased mortality. The CHA2DS2-VASc score is used to estimate thromboembolic risk in AF. However, the association among MAC, MetS and thromboembolic risk is unknown and was evaluated in the current study. Methods: The study group consisted of 94 patients with ...
Source: Revista Brasileira de Cirurgia Cardiovascular - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
In conclusion, the impaired in situ activity of RyR2 may also account for the poor overall cardiac outcome reported in MetS patients; hence, the SERCA pump and RyR2 are both attractive potential targets for future therapies. Introduction Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of biochemical and physiological risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2); it represents a severe public health problem around the world (Alberti et al., 2009). Risk factors for MetS include obesity (particularly central obesity), elevated triglyceride (TG) levels, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
This study aimed to compare the effect of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) with moderate-intensity continuous training (MCT) on endothelial function, oxidative stress and clinical fitness in patients with type 1 diabetes. Thirty-six type 1 diabetic patients (mean age 23.5 ± 6 years) were randomized into 3 groups: HIIT, MCT, and a non-exercising group (CON). Exercise was performed in a stationary cycle ergometers during 40 min, 3 times/week, for 8 weeks at 50–85% maximal heart rate (HRmax) in HIIT and 50% HRmax in MCT. Endothelial function was measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) [endothelium-depende...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusions In this review, we analyzed mechanisms through which mitobolites, a distinct set of mitochondria-generated metabolites, can be released from mitochondria and then act as second messengers that contribute to cellular and organismal aging by regulating longevity-defining processes outside of mitochondria. Our analysis indicates that in eukaryotes across phyla, these second messengers of cellular aging exhibit the following common features: (1) they are produced in mitochondria in response to certain changes in the nutrient, stress, proliferation or age status of the cell; it remains unknown, however, what kind o...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
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