The FDA Is Cracking Down on Imodium and Other Anti-Diarrhea Medicine Because of the Opioid Epidemic

(WASHINGTON) — U.S. health regulators on Tuesday asked makers of popular anti-diarrhea drugs to sell their medications in smaller amounts to make them harder to abuse. The request comes amid a spike in overdoses from large doses of the over-the-counter drugs, which contain a small amount of an opioid. The Food and Drug Administration wants manufacturers to package their medications in smaller quantities, such as eight tablets per package. Currently, some generic versions are sold in boxes of up to 200 tablets. The FDA said it also plans to ask online retailers to make it harder to order bulk amounts of the drugs. The key ingredient in anti-diarrhea medications like Imodium is part of the opioid family, an addictive drug class that includes morphine and oxycodone. At low doses, the medicine, known generically as loperamide, helps control diarrhea. But recent statistics show a rise in abuse of the drug, including massive doses that can cause heart problems and death. In some reported cases, people attempted to wean themselves off opioids by substituting the anti-diarrhea drugs. Fifteen deaths were tied to the drug between 2010 and 2016, researchers reported in a study last year. Previously, some experts have called for sales restrictions on the medicine similar to pseudoephedrine, the decongestant in Sudafed that can be processed into methamphetamine. Pharmacies now keep Sudafed and related medicines behind the counter and limit purchases. But such restrictions generally...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime opioids Source Type: news

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COVID-19: Courtesy of NIAID The precarious intersection of the COVID-19 national health emergency and the concurrent epidemic of drug overdose deaths is outlined in the Annals of Internal Medicine this week by Dr. Nora D. Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part...
Source: NIDA News - Category: Addiction Tags: Addiction Science, Health and Medical Professionals, Methamphetamine, NIDAMED News, Opioids, Researchers, Tobacco Source Type: news
The overprescribing of opioid pain relievers (OPR) has led to a significant increase in opioid addiction and overdose. A cornerstone of combating the opioid epidemic is the development of peri-operative evidence based guidelines to standardize OPR prescribing practices and of opioid sparing Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) protocols. ERAS has been found to reduce the volume of OPR prescribed while improving outcomes and overall patient satisfaction in adult gynecologic and multiple pediatric surgical specialties.
Source: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
With the rise of the opioid epidemic, stories of addiction and its casualties feature prominently in the media with unprecedented frequency. According to the CDC, in 2016, more than 60,000 individuals died of drug overdose. Though we would like to imagine that this modern-day plague has left youths untouched, research suggests otherwise. According to the authors of Brief Interventions for Adolescent Alcohol and Substance Use, “when considering substance use etiology and interventions, one obvious reason to focus on adolescence is because that’s where the drugs are” (p 17).
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Book forum Source Type: research
More than 25 million Americans suffer from daily chronic pain, a highly debilitating medical condition that is complex and difficult to manage. In recent decades, there has been an overreliance on the prescription of opioids for chronic pain, contributing to a significant and alarming epidemic of opioid overdose deaths and addiction. Innovative scientific solutions to develop non-opioid, non-addictive alternative treatment options are thus urgently needed. One of the goals of the Helping to End Addiction Long-term (HEAL) Initiative is to accelerate the discovery and preclinical development of new medications and devices to...
Source: Videocast - All Events - Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video
More than 25 million Americans suffer from daily chronic pain, a highly debilitating medical condition that is complex and difficult to manage. In recent decades, there has been an overreliance on the prescription of opioids for chronic pain, contributing to a significant and alarming epidemic of opioid overdose deaths and addiction. Innovative scientific solutions to develop non-opioid, non-addictive alternative treatment options are thus urgently needed. One of the goals of the Helping to End Addiction Long-term (HEAL) Initiative is to accelerate the discovery and preclinical development of new medications and devices to...
Source: Videocast - All Events - Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video
Conclusions: Fatal opioid overdose accounted for over half a million YLL in Ohio during the 7-year study period. Opioid overdose mortality rose annually. Fentanyl involved overdoses accounted for a growing proportion of excess mortality. Burden was not equally distributed within the state. Two distinct geographical clusters of excess mortality were identified in the northeast and south.
Source: Journal of Addiction Medicine - Category: Addiction Tags: Original Research Source Type: research
New research appearing in the journal Addiction shows that the number of deaths attributed to opioid-related overdoses could be 28 percent higher than reported due to incomplete death records. This discrepancy is more pronounced in several states, including Alabama, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Louisiana, and Indiana, where the estimated number of deaths more than doubles – obscuring the scope of the opioid crisis and potentially affecting programs and funding intended to confront the epidemic.
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: news
Authors: Hanna MN, Chambers C, Punyala A, Iqbal A, Singh B, Oruc C, Prakash P, Prajapati Y, Wang Y, Amery Ai Z, Shechter R, Speed TJ, Koch CG, Williams K Abstract The use of opioid analgesics for pain management has increased dramatically over the past decade, with corresponding increases in negative sequelae including overdose and death. Physicians, policymakers, and researchers are focused on finding ways to decrease opioid use and overdose. This crisis calls for a coordinated response that includes the entire healthcare sector. In this work, the authors lay out a blueprint for such a response at the level of the...
Source: Journal of Opioid Management - Category: Addiction Tags: J Opioid Manag Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Given increasing rates of opioid addiction and death, viable solutions are universally needed. Successful intervention measures should be widely shared between military, veteran, and civilian healthcare and public health communities. Increased collaboration between these groups could inculcate successful programs to prevent and decrease opioid use. Results received from recent military and veterans' programs for prescription and electronic medical record (EMR) monitoring and data sharing may also prove useful for civilian healthcare providers and hospital systems. Future evaluations from ongoing federally fund...
Source: Military Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Mil Med Source Type: research
New largescale study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found overprescription of opioids by dentists common, particularly to patients at high risk for substance abuse, and that almost 1/3 of patients received more powerful drugs than neededElsevierIMAGE: In this cross-sectional analysis of 542,958 dental visits by adult patients, between 1 in 4 and 1 in 2 opioid prescriptions exceeded the recommended morphine equivalents and days'supply for...viewmore Credit: Michelle S. Woods Ann Arbor, February 4, 2020 - Dentists are among top prescribers of opioids in the US, however, whether their opioid prescrib...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - Category: Dentistry Source Type: news
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