How to tell seniors they ’re too old for cancer screening

Cancer screening can save lives. Mammographies reduce the chance women will die of breast cancer; and colonoscopies reduce the chance people will die of colon cancer. But should my 93-year-old father receive a screening colonoscopy? The test is uncomfortable, carries risks, and costs money. Even more importantly, my dad probably won’t live long enough to benefit from the test. That’s why most medical experts think people like my dad—people unlikely to live another decade—should not receive cancer screening tests like colonoscopies. But how in the heck is my dad’s doctor supposed to deliver this news to him? My father’s primary care doctor could tell him: “I have good news for you. You don’t need a colonoscopy — you’ll probably die of something else before colon cancer gets you!” But according to recent research, that message isn’t likely to go over well with its audience. The study, out of Johns Hopkins, convened senior citizens and asked them what they thought about conducting screening tests in patients of advanced age. The people told researchers that they understood the concept of stopping testing when people get too old to benefit. But they did not like the thought of doctors telling them that their impending mortality is the reason they will no longer receive such testing. “You’re too old to benefit” is a harsh message. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Geriatrics Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

Health-Related Complications of Acromegaly—Risk of Malignant Neoplasms Marek Ruchala*† and Kosma Wolinski† Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Internal Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland The issue of increased risk of benign and malignant neoplasms in patients with acromegaly remains the topic of debate from many years and was addressed by numerous studies. Many of them have shown increase in the cancer incidence. Among particular types of malignancies, thyroid, colorectal, and breast cancer are most commonly indicated as associated with acromegaly. Single ...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
This study analyzed data from women over 40 and compared the size of breast cancers at the time of diagnosis detected in the 1970s (before mammography became common) with the size of tumors detected between 2000 and 2002, when screening mammography was routine. Treatments and rates of death due to breast cancer 10 years after the diagnosis were also analyzed. The study found that: As more women underwent routine screening mammograms, more small breast cancers were detected. Many of these tumors were restricted to the ducts within the breast (called ductal carcinoma in situ), and even without treatment would never threaten...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Let us sing the praises of good medical screening tests. These are the tests that can detect medical problems before they become untreatable and before they cause complications or even death. Even better are those screening tests that detect “predisease” — abnormalities that aren’t dangerous on their own but can lead to problems later. According to the US Preventive Services Task Force, relatively few screening tests are considered good enough to routinely recommend for adults, including mammography for breast cancer (women) Pap smear for cervical cancer (women) b...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Cancer Health Prevention Screening Source Type: blogs
We do regularly try to detect some cancers early through mammograms, colonoscopies, and PSA tests. I think most of us (meaning the general public) are comfortable with these tests as we age. But what if there was a genetic test available which you could have done regularly, every few years or whatever time frame, to test you for several different cancers before they had a chance to spread.A new test,CancerSEEK, has been tested on more than 1000 patients and seems very hopeful." The CancerSEEK test looks for mutations in 16 genes that regularly arise in cancer and eight proteins that are often released.It was trialled ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer detection cancer diagnosis medical tests Source Type: blogs
Shutterstock Cancer screening can save lives: Mammographies reduce the chance women will die of breast cancer; and colonoscopies reduce the chance people will die of colon cancer. But should my 93-year-old father receive a screening colonoscopy? The test is uncomfortable, … Continue reading → The post How to Tell Grandpa He Is Too Old for Another Colonoscopy appeared first on PeterUbel.com.
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care cancer screening Doctor patient communication Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
Shutterstock As a primary care physician, I have counseled thousands of patients to get cancer screening—blood tests to look for prostate cancer, mammograms to detect impalpable breast cancers, and colonoscopies to find precancerous colon lesions. I’ve even tried to find … Continue reading → The post Why Living in a Rich Country Can Give You Cancer appeared first on PeterUbel.com.
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care breast cancer cancer screening Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
This article examines the effects of a community intervention (Fe en Acción/Faith in Action) led by community health workers (promotoras) on promoting breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening among churchgoing Latinas. Sixteen churches were randomly assigned to a cancer screening or a physical activity intervention. We examined cancer knowledge, barriers to screening and self-reported mammography, clinical breast exam, Pap test, fecal occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy at baseline and 12 months follow-up. Participants were 436 adult Latinas, with 16 promotoras conducting a cancer screening in...
Source: Health Education Research - Category: Research Source Type: research
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 23 June 2016 Source:Human Pathology: Case Reports Author(s): Raquel Albero-González, Javier Gimeno-Beltrán, Ivonne Vázquez‐de las Heras, Joan Martínez-Orfila, Agustín Seoane-Urgorri, Dolores Naranjo‐Hans, Josep Maria Corominas, Mar Iglesias‐Coma, Francesc Alameda‐Quitllet Lobular breast carcinoma involving the colon is a rare condition. In most cases reported in the literature, metastases are detected after a 20-year latency period after the initial diagnosis. Here we describe a case in which metastatic lobular breast carcinoma and col...
Source: Human Pathology: Case Reports - Category: Pathology Source Type: research
Objectives: To present outcomes of a controlled two-group clustered randomized community trial promoting breast, cervical, skin and colorectal cancer screening (CS) among churchgoing Latinas through promotoras (lay health advisors).Design: Sixteen churches were randomly assigned either to the CS or a physical activity (PA) condition. Sixteen promotoras at the 8 CS churches intervened at the individual- (knowledge and beliefs), interpersonal- (social support and sharing personal experiences), organizational- (space at church for program activities), and environmental- (access to health care) levels to affect changes in targ...
Source: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Community-Based Interventions: Poster Presentations - Proffered Abstracts Source Type: research
More News: Blogging | Breast Cancer | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Colon Cancer | Colonoscopy | Colorectal Cancer | General Medicine | Geriatrics | Mammography | Primary Care | Study | Women