Specific IgE to gelatin as a cause of anaphylaxis to zoster vaccine

Reading the recent letter from Stone et  al1 reminded us of a subject from our previous galactose-α-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) study. Indeed, she may well be the same 76-year-old lady found in the letter (Table E1) who was reported as negative to alpha-gal. Her first reaction to meat started 45 minutes after eating barbecue, only a few months following her recovery from Lyme disease.2,3 Since then she has had multiple reactions of varying severity, some of which started less than 1 hour after ingestion of red meat.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

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Abstract PURPOSE: Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only curative treatment for allergic diseases, but a few allergic patients receive AIT. In this multicenter cross-sectional study, we aimed to explore patient and physician perspectives on AIT through a questionnaire survey. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Allergic patients who received subcutaneous immunotherapy for at least 1 year were asked to answer a questionnaire developed by an expert panel of allergen and immunotherapy workgroup in Korea. RESULTS: A total of 267 patients (adults, 60.3%) with allergic rhinitis (91.4%), asthma (42.7%), or atopic...
Source: Yonsei Medical Journal - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Yonsei Med J Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 25 April 2019Source: Meat ScienceAuthor(s): Alberto Alía, Alicia Rodríguez, María J. Andrade, Francisco M. Gómez, Juan J. CórdobaAbstractThe combined effect of temperature, water activity (aw) and NaCl content, usually found in dry-cured ham, on the growth and expression of the virulence and stress-related genes of Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated in a dry-cured ham model system. The highest growth of this pathogen was observed at 15 °C and, at 0.98 and 0.96 aw values. At 0.94 and 0.92 aw values, moderate NaCl levels stimulated the L. monocytog...
Source: Meat Science - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 23 April 2019Source: LWTAuthor(s): Ewa Rasinska, Jaroslawa Rutkowska, Ewa Czarniecka-Skubina, Krzysztof TamborAbstractThe effects of boiling, roasting and sous-vide on the cooking loss, lipid and water content, lipid oxidation, fatty acids (FAs) contents and volatile profile (VC) of rabbit meat were studied. Sous-vide resulted in lower cooking loss (20.12%) as compared with boiling (30.66%) and roasting (32.28%). Cooked meat (C-meat) contained higher amount of lipids: sous-vide (6.30%), boiling (5.91%), roasting (4.83%), as compared with raw meat (R-meat; 4.24%). Cooking increased saturat...
Source: LWT Food Science and Technology - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 April 2019Source: LWTAuthor(s): Alfonsina Moavro, Sebastian Stenglein, Lucrecia Delfederico, Jorge Wagner, Vanesa LudemannAbstractPenicillium nalgiovense is not used intentionally by the dairy industry although it is a well-known species for meat products. The aim of this study was to select P. nalgiovense strains characterized in their genetic diversity, based on their ability to grow on the surface of a stuffed cheese and produce the lowest amounts of penicillin in that product. The most suitable strain was used to develop an innovative cheese, which was characterized (physicochemica...
Source: LWT Food Science and Technology - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 25 April 2019Source: Food ControlAuthor(s): Magdalena Montowska, Emilia Fornal, Michał Piątek, Mirosława Krzywdzińska-BartkowiakAbstractThe application of various functional protein additives in the meat industry is still increasing. Soy, milk and egg white proteins are applied to various types of meat product to improve their structural properties or as good substitutes for meat and fat components. It is common practice to add these preparations to reduce production costs. New methods are needed for reliable detection of small amounts of these additives in complex and processed food ...
Source: Food Control - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
In this study nine epitopes were predicted as promising vaccine candidate against ILTV. In vivo and in vitro studies are required to support the effectiveness of these predicted epitopes as a multipeptide vaccine through clinical trials. PMID: 31011331 [PubMed]
Source: Advances in Bioinformatics - Category: Bioinformatics Tags: Adv Bioinformatics Source Type: research
[Premium Times] Nigeria has the most children unvaccinated and under-vaccinated against measles in the world, despite a global decline in deaths from the dangerous but preventable disease.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
[Premium Times] Nigeria has concluded plans for mass vaccination of children in all parts of the country throughout the period of the 2019 African Vaccination Week.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
Reading the recent letter from Stone et  al1 reminded us of a subject from our previous galactose-α-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) study. Indeed, she may well be the same 76-year-old lady found in the letter (Table E1) who was reported as negative to alpha-gal. Her first reaction to meat started 45 minutes after eating barbecue, only a few months following her recovery from Lyme disease.2,3 Since then she has had multiple reactions of varying severity, some of which started less than 1 hour after ingestion of red meat.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
​How could a Lyme disease lookalike rash and anaphylaxis to meat have anything in common? As I found out recently, they do. They both have a common vector, the Lone Star Tick, which is also known by its formal name, Amblyomma americanum, and is found predominately in the East, Southeast, and Southwest. It is an aggressive tick that loves humans.In fact, all three growth stages (adult, nymph, and larva) are known to feed on humans. Besides the common signs of irritation that often accompany a tick bite, a rash similar to the rash of Lyme disease has been commonly described. This "bull's-eye" rash is often accomp...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
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