A Rare but Growing Cause of Abdominal Pain

​BY MARK GRANT, DO, &SARAH CARIGNAN, PA-CThe patient had been playing a round of golf a week earlier, and thought he had strained a muscle in his right lower back while swinging a golf club. The patient continued his golf workouts throughout the week, which included lifting weights and swinging a golf club with minimal pain.​The day prior to ED presentation, he began having worsening right-sided back pain, and began ibuprofen and ice treatment, which helped minimally. The patient woke up experiencing worsening back pain that radiated from his right flank to his right lower abdominal area. He reported increased pain with ambulation, and on presentation was experiencing sweats and a fever. His mother reported that the patient had a temperature of 101°F.He had no appetite, was nauseated, and complained of pain in the right flank area that radiated to the right lower abdominal area. The patient's heart rate was 104 bpm, blood pressure was 115/49 mm Hg, oxygen saturation was 97% on room air, and his temperature was 99.3°F orally. The patient denied testicular pain, dysuria, hematuria, diarrhea, constipation, and URI symptoms. He had an unremarkable past medical history, no prior surgeries, no significant family history or social history, and was not sexually active.Physical exam findings revealed an unremarkable ENT exam. He was tachycardic without any murmurs, and his lungs were clear to auscultation. The patient's abdominal exam revealed pain at McBurney's point,...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research

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Authors: Reissier S, Cattoir V Abstract INTRODUCTION: Streptogramins (pristinamycin and quinupristin-dalfopristin) can be interesting options for the treatment of infections due to Gram-positive cocci, especially multidrug-resistant isolates. AREAS COVERED: This review provides an updated overview on structural and activity characteristics, mechanisms of action and resistance, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and clinical use of streptogramins. EXPERT OPINION: The streptogramin antibiotics act by inhibition of the bacterial protein synthesis. They are composed of two chemically distinct compounds, namely typ...
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
We describe the most highly recommended generic and disease-specific PRO tools in SCD and discuss the challenges of incorporating them in clinical practice. EXPERT OPINION: PRO measures are essential to incorporate into SCD clinical trials either as primary or secondary outcomes. The use of PRO measures in SCD facilitates a patient-centered approach, which is likely to lead to improved outcomes. Significant challenges remain in adapting PRO tools to routine clinical use and in developing countries. PMID: 33034214 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Expert Review of Hematology - Category: Hematology Tags: Expert Rev Hematol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Xyloglucan/gelose plus ORS was effective and safe in treating acute diarrhea in children. PMID: 33028102 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Immunohistochemistry seems to be a promising option not only in clinical recognition, but also in the selection and monitoring of treatment effects. However, these methods have not yet recommended for routine clinical use. PMID: 33032462 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Scand J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Currently in fellowship doing bread/butter procedures (MBB, epidurals, PNB, few SCS/PNS trials, etc.) and just interviewed at a private practice spot where they do a lot of procedures that I will have not done any training in prior to graduating (e.g. IT pump, SI fusion, Vertiflex, Kypho, MILD, Discectomy, lots of SCS/PNS trials etc) and significant amount of "OR pain procedures" at a very busy practice seeing 30-40 pts/day - how many of you are commonly performing these procedures and are... private practice concern
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Pain Medicine Source Type: forums
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Clinical Plasma MedicineAuthor(s): Dr. Arisi Mariachiara, Venturuzzo Anna, Gelmetti Alessandra, Guasco Pisani Edoardo, Bassissi Stefania, Rossi Mariateresa, Calzavara-Pinton Piergiacomo
Source: Clinical Plasma Medicine - Category: Research Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The proposed PHARMAC criteria will give access to these important drugs to those people with T2DM who will likely benefit the most. PMID: 33032305 [PubMed - in process]
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research
Authors: Siamashvili M, Davis S Abstract INTRODUCTION: Bromocriptine mesylate quick release (QR) is a dopamine D2 receptor agonist and is the only oral, primarily centrally acting drug that can be used for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes. AREAS COVERED: The authors describe current recommendations on the use of bromocriptine mesylate QR. Major efficacy and safety parameters of the late phase trials, including The Cycloset Safety Trial, have been identified and presented. EXPERT OPINION: Efficacy of bromocriptine mesylate QR monotherapy appears to be low but is compensated by favorable safety pr...
Source: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Expert Opin Pharmacother Source Type: research
Conclusions: (1) Data at our center suggests at least a regional implementation gap in GBS screening and IAP. (2) The decline in the resistance rate ofE. coli for all antimicrobial substances might indicate that the reduction of prenatal antibiotics use is beneficial and that neonatal antibiotic stewardship programs should include pregnant women as well.What is Known:• GBS screening and intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis led to a 32%-reduction in GBS disease in Germany with a 0.75 (92:122) ratio of early-onset disease to late-onset disease in 2009–2010.• Prenatal antibiotic use might increase the risk of E....
Source: European Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
Conclusion: Ambulatory renal and cardio-vascular follow-up in case of neonatal medical history can be enhanced, with necessity to raise awareness and to edict guidelines available to pediatricians.What is Known:•There is a compelling evidence of long-term renal and cardiovascular consequences of prematurity and low birth weight.•Specific cardiovascular and renal follow-up guidelines, coming from professional organizations, are currently not available for these patients.What is New:•Pediatricians in ambulatory setting do not adapt their renal and cardiovascular follow-up in case of neonatal medical history.&b...
Source: European Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
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