Fundoplication for GERD: Laparoscopic Nissen Bests Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication for GERD: Laparoscopic Nissen Bests Transoral Incisionless

Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) appears to be a better alternative than transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to a systematic review and network meta-analysis.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - Category: Surgery Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

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ConclusionThe rare clinical entity of a WS necessitates a targeted diagnostic evaluation and therapy. Clinical details, diagnostic studies and treatment are discussed here.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
AbstractThe development of achalasia in patients with a prior Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is rare and it often remains unclear whether the esophageal motility disorder is a pre-existing condition in the obese patient or develops de novo after the procedure. The aim of this study was to review the available evidence regarding the management of patients with achalasia after a RYGB. Intra-sphincteric injection of botulinum toxin and pneumatic dilatation can be used to eliminate the functional obstruction at the level of the gastroesophageal junction. However, considering that achalasia patients after RYGB are often young ...
Source: Updates in Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Conclusions: MSA is a safe, simple, and standardized antireflux procedure. It is also feasible in patients with refractory GERD following gastric/bariatric surgery. Further prospective and comparative studies are needed to validate the preliminary clinical experience in this subset of patients. PMID: 31624454 [PubMed - in process]
Source: JSLS : Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons - Category: Surgery Tags: JSLS Source Type: research
AbstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between bariatric surgery (laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy [LSG] and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [LRYGB]) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The number of obese patients with newly onset, worsened, or improved GERD after bariatric surgery in each article were extracted. In the pooled analysis, LSG was associated with a higher risk of GERD than LRYGB (odds ratio [OR] = 5.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.60 –7.23,p
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
This surgery is done under general anesthesia with a laparoscope, a thin tube with a tiny video camera. The surgeon sews the top of the stomach around the esophagus.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Abstract Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is characterized by acid and bile reflux in the distal oesophagus, and this may cause the development of reflux esophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus (BE). The natural histological course of untreated BE is non-dysplastic or benign BE (ND) than low-grade (LGD), and high-grade dysplastic (HGD) BE, with the expected increase in malignancy transfer to oesophagal adenocarcinoma (EAC). The gold standard for BE diagnostics involves high-resolution white-light endoscopy, followed by uniform endoscopy findings description (Prague classification) with biopsy performance accord...
Source: Mini Reviews in Medicinal Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Mini Rev Med Chem Source Type: research
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has a reported incidence of between 10% and 20% in Western populations with an even higher incidence in populations with obesity [1]. The vast majority of patients are managed medically with surgical intervention undertaken in those with recalcitrant GERD. Populations with obesity and recalcitrant GERD who are interested in weight loss surgery have historically undergone laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB). De Goot et  al. [2], in their 2009 meta-analysis, demonstrated improvement in GERD in people with obesity after LRYGB.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Video case report Source Type: research
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has a reported incidence of between 10 to 20% in western populations with an even higher incidence in populations with obesity (1). The vast majority of patients are managed medically with surgical intervention undertaken in those with recalcitrant GERD. Populations with obesity and recalcitrant GERD who are interested in weight loss surgery have historically undergone Laparoscopic Roux En Y Gastric Bypass (LRYGB). De Goot et al in their 2009 meta-analysis demonstrated improvement in GERD in people with obesity following LRYGB(2).
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionsPatients submitted to LSG showed a significant and progressive increase in the presence of “de novo” GERD. Also, an increased duodenogastric reflux was seen through an open and immobile pylorus. Therefore, based on these results, it seems like LSG is a “pro-reflux” surgical procedure, which should be continuously evaluated late after surgery.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Journal of Laparoendoscopic&Advanced Surgical Techniques, Ahead of Print.
Source: Journal of Laparoendoscopic - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
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