The Biomarker Disruptor

Would you rather get a biopsy or a blood test to check for prostate cancer? Quanterix chairman/CEO Kevin Hrusovsky said with the help of his company's latest product, the SR-X Ultra-Sensitive Biomarker Detection System, a simple blood test could replace, or complement, invasive diagnostic procedures. Using digital technology, the SR-X can detect cancer, neurological disorders, inflammatory and infectious diseases, and heart events months or even years earlier, and less invasively, than existing technology.   Using Quanterix's single molecule array (Simoa) science, which is similar to a digital enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the SR-X measures six biomarkers simultaneously with a roughly 1,000-fold improvement in sensitivity. This precision allows researchers to see proteins at a level not seen before; thus, detecting diseases when they're more easily treatable. As it builds its diagnostics division, Quanterix—which closed its IPO in December 2017—is putting its attention on two lower-risk areas: research, to discover and validate new biomarkers; and pharmaceuticals, where the company already has a strong foothold. During the 2018 JP Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco, Hrusovsky said 23 of the top 25 pharmaceutical companies use Quanterix's technology. "There are ways to use biomarkers to make drugs less toxic and more effective by lowering the dose and making them more personalized," he explained in an interview. It's a worthwh...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: IVD Source Type: news

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During the production of this paper, an error appeared in the title. The title should be, “Immune Checkpoint Inhibition Combined With Intracranial Stereotactic Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Is There an Increasing Rate of Radionecrosis or Not? In Regards to Schapira et al, Huppeling et al and Colaco et al.”
Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Tags: Erratum Source Type: research
Prostate cancer is the leading cause of cancer treatment –related years lived with disability for men worldwide.1 This has driven a disruptive change in management of favorable-risk prostate cancer such that nearly all National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) very low-risk patients are recommended conservative management rather than radical therapy. 2 Simultaneously, at the other end of the risk spectrum, treatment intensification with more potent systemic therapies has been the subject of recent trials for men with higher-risk disease (eg, NCT02772588).
Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research
In the above referenced article, portions of the text and table reading “CALGB 80801” should have read “CALGB 80101,” to correctly reflect the referenced Fuchs CS et al. publication and CALGB study. The authors regret the error.
Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Tags: Erratum Source Type: research
The authors' letter and translational research work support the question posed in the review1,2: Are we at the tipping point for the era of real-time radiation therapy? The research by Dahele and Verbakel adds additional clinical evidence that real-time 3-dimensional image guided radiation therapy (3D IGRT) can be performed on standard-equipped cancer radiation therapy (RT) systems. Indeed, had it been published or known to us before we wrote the review, their clinical translation of markerless spine tracking3 would have been included as a fourth real-time 3D IGRT implementation on standard-equipped systems.
Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Comment Source Type: research
Multiple randomized studies have demonstrated that breast-conserving therapy (partial mastectomy plus whole breast radiation) can yield survival outcomes equivalent to those of mastectomy (1). However, newer population-based data suggest that breast cancer –specific survival and overall survival with breast-conserving therapy may actually be better than those with mastectomy (2-8). How is this possible? How can removal of the breast yield outcomes inferior to those of a therapy that leaves most of the breast intact and where in-breast failures are r eported to occur in approximately 5% to 10% of patients at 10 y...
Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research
In the world of cancer care, Halstedian paradigms for radical surgery have evolved toward organ preservation strategies without compromising the probability of cure. As such, clinicians have increasingly turned their focus toward minimizing the stigmata of treatment, with patient-centered outcomes having greater influence on decision making. Today, patients are typically able to preserve much of their functional anatomy and cosmesis. For example, selected patients with head and neck cancers are routinely offered a strategy of larynx preservation with upfront radiation therapy and chemotherapy, reserving a more morbid total...
Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research
A 66-year-old ex-smoker presented with metastatic renal cell cancer with lytic lesions in the left femur, T8, and a 1.5-cm lesion in the right lung. A biopsy from the femur confirmed clear cell renal cell cancer; the lung lesion could not be biopsied safely. The patient underwent a radical nephrectomy (pathologically staged as pT3a). He commenced sunitinib, which was stopped owing to severe hypertension, followed by everolimus, stopped after 8 cycles owing to muscle cramping. Repeat imaging demonstrated resolution of the lung nodule but progression in the left femur, T8, and new disease in the anterior right 10th rib and left humerus.
Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Gray Zone Source Type: research
Authors: Mitolo M, Tonon C, La Morgia C, Testa C, Carelli V, Lodi R Abstract BACKGROUND: Bright light treatment is a therapeutic intervention mainly used to treat sleep and circadian disturbances in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Recently, a handful of studies also focused on the effect on cognition and behavior. Conflicting findings are reported in the literature, and no definite conclusions have been drawn about its specific therapeutic effect. SUMMARY: The aim of this review is to provide a critical evaluation of available evidence in this field, highlighting the specific characteristics of effective bri...
Source: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Individuals with AD are at higher risk of manifesting aggressive behaviors than healthy individuals or those with MCI. Our findings not only underscore the necessity of treatment of aggressive behaviors in AD but also highlight the importance of preventing the transition from MCI to AD. PMID: 30527275 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research
In conclusion, weight cycling significantly increased life-span relative to remaining with obesity and had a similar benefit to sustained modest weight loss. Support for Oxidized Cholesterol as a Primary Cause of Atherosclerosis https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/11/support-for-oxidized-cholesterol-as-a-primary-cause-of-atherosclerosis/ In the paper I'll point out today, the authors provide evidence in support of the concept that it is specifically oxidized cholesterol that is the primary cause of atherosclerosis rather than the condition resulting from too much cholesterol in general. In atheroscl...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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