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The Effect of Physical Activity on PTSD.

The Effect of Physical Activity on PTSD. Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2018 Jan 10;:1-9 Authors: Oppizzi LM, Umberger R Abstract Although physical activity (PA) is known to reduce anxiety and depression, less is known about the effects of PA on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The author examined the state of the science regarding the effect of PA on PTSD. Three themes emerged: PA characteristics, added benefits of PA as a PTSD intervention, and theories on the method of action. Physical activity seems to be an effective adjunct therapy to reduce PTSD symptom severity. Findings are inconsistent between observational and controlled studies. More research is needed to identify the most effective type, dose, and duration of exercise. The primary author is responsible for review, synthesis, and analysis of the literature as well as preparation of the manuscript. The corresponding author is responsible for reviewing and editing the manuscript. All authors have reviewed the submitted manuscript and approve the manuscript for submission. SUMMARY STATEMENT Why is this review needed? • Post-traumatic stress disorder is a debilitating condition that is growing in prevalence and, if untreated or undertreated, can have significant impact on individuals, families, and ultimately the society at large. • Traditional treatment includes psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy; however, many who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder have limited access to these t...
Source: Issues in Mental Health Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Issues Ment Health Nurs Source Type: research

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ABSTRACTObjectivePosttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with incident cardiovascular risk. We tested the association of PTSD with clinic and ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in a sample of healthy participants and tested ABP reactivity to anxiety as a mechanism by which PTSD may influence blood pressure (BP).MethodsParticipants were originally enrolled during workplace BP screenings at three sites; approximately 6 years (standard deviation = 1.0) later, they completed nine clinic BP assessments within three visits, 1 week apart. Before the third visit, participants were screened for PTSD (≥33 on the PTSD Chec...
Source: Psychosomatic Medicine - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Recent research published in the November 2017 issue of Brain, Behavior, and Immunity suggests that a woman’s immune response in the brain may decrease during pregnancy and the postpartum period. These findings, discussed by the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, might help to establish a connection between the brain’s immune function and the anxiety and mood disorders that are common throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period. Previous research has shown that during pregnancy, the response of the body’s peripheral immune system (the part of our protective system that does not protect the brain)...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Research Women's Issues Bipolar Depression fetal development immune changes Immune Function Immunity immunosuppression Mania miscarriage Moth Source Type: blogs
Most people understand the concept of physical abuse. If you’re in a relationship where your partner is physically hurting you, this is an obvious sign that: 1. Things are not okay 2. This will probably not be the last time. 3. This relationship has the potential to be very dangerous. Emotional abuse is more confusing. Depending on how someone was raised, where they grew up, and who influenced their life, the term “emotional/psychological abuse” may vary. While there is no official definition of the term, the outcome is usually the same.  Emotional abuse can lead to: Anxiety Depression PTSD Probl...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anger Bullying Narcissism PTSD Relationships Trauma Abusive Relationship Instincts Manipulation Psychological abuse self-compassion self-confidence Source Type: blogs
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-125 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites cooperative agreement applications for investigator-initiated clinical trials of natural products to treat clinical symptoms such as those associated with sleep disturbance, pain conditions, or some mental health conditions (e.g., mild to moderate depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress), or examine the effects of probiotics and other natural products on gut-microbiome interactions with the brain and/or immune system. All applications submitted under this FOA must be supported by sufficien...
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe purpose of this study was to review the frequency, risk factors, phenomenology, and course of prolonged recovery from concussion and of psychiatric sequelae in pediatric populations.Recent FindingsYouth with prolonged recovery from concussions have higher initial symptoms, a history of multiple and/or recent concussions, and a tendency to somatization. Depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, behavioral disorders, and perhaps, suicidal behavior disorder are more common as both short- and longer-term sequelae of concussions. The weight of evidence supports a graduated return to function as co...
Source: Current Psychiatry Reports - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
DiscussionThis trial will be the first randomised controlled trial to examine sleep-enhancing treatment in trauma-affected refugees, as well as the first trial to investigate the effect of IRT and mianserin in this population. Therefore, this trial may optimise treatment recommendations for sleep disturbances in trauma-affected refugees. Based on our findings, we expect to discuss the effect of treatment, focussing on sleep disturbances. Furthermore, the results will provide new information regarding the association between sleep disturbances, PTSD symptoms, psychosocial functioning and quality of life in trauma-affected r...
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Technology is rapidly advancing and more people are depending on it to stay in touch with friends, finding the quickest way to work or doing their weekly shopping. It is no surprise that people are turning to their smartphones to improve their mental wellbeing. There are many mobile applications available on smartphones that claim to improve your mental health, however not all mental health apps are created equal and it is important to know how to make sure the one you are using is truly helpful. Joseph Firth and colleagues conducted the first meta-analysis of apps for depressive symptoms in October 2017, which was publis...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Research Stigma Technology Treatment Attention Deficit Disorder Confidentiality Depression mobile apps Privacy Sleep Disorder Smartphone Source Type: blogs
Conclusions We observed that the members of the three communities shared several overlapping concerns (i.e., sleep- and work-related problems) and discussion patterns (i.e., sharing of positive emotion and showing gratitude for receiving emotional support). We also highlighted that the discussions from the r/Anxiety and r/PTSD communities were more similar to one another than to discussions from the r/Depression community. The r/Anxiety and r/PTSD subreddit members are more likely to be individuals whose experiences with a condition are long-term, and who are interested in treatments and medications. The r/Depression subre...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - Category: Information Technology Source Type: research
You're reading 7 Things a Person with a Mental Illness Doesn’t Want to Hear, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. In the United States alone, nearly one out of every five people is suffering with one or more mental illnesses. That means that when a person passes you by on the street, they have a better chance of having a mental illness than of having green eyes. Yet, why are so many people struggling with knowing what to say, or maybe what NOT to say, when they are talking to a person with anxiety, depre...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: depression featured psychology self confidence self improvement mental health mental illness pickthebrain relationships Source Type: blogs
Everyone ruminates. We especially ruminate when we’re stressed out. Maybe you’re ruminating about an upcoming test—you have to score an A to keep your scholarship. Maybe you’re ruminating about an upcoming presentation because you want to impress your boss. Maybe you’re ruminating about an upcoming date and the many ways it could go. Maybe you’re ruminating about a bad performance review. Maybe you’re ruminating about an injury that’s really been bothering you. “We are evolutionarily wired to obsess,” according to psychiatrist Britton Arey, M.D. We are wired to se...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anorexia Anxiety Binge Eating Bulimia Depression Disorders Eating Disorders General Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Panic Disorder Psychology Stress Treatment Anxiety Disorders Distressing Thoughts Mindfulness Negative Thinki Source Type: news
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