The Effect of Physical Activity on PTSD.

The Effect of Physical Activity on PTSD. Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2018 Jan 10;:1-9 Authors: Oppizzi LM, Umberger R Abstract Although physical activity (PA) is known to reduce anxiety and depression, less is known about the effects of PA on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The author examined the state of the science regarding the effect of PA on PTSD. Three themes emerged: PA characteristics, added benefits of PA as a PTSD intervention, and theories on the method of action. Physical activity seems to be an effective adjunct therapy to reduce PTSD symptom severity. Findings are inconsistent between observational and controlled studies. More research is needed to identify the most effective type, dose, and duration of exercise. The primary author is responsible for review, synthesis, and analysis of the literature as well as preparation of the manuscript. The corresponding author is responsible for reviewing and editing the manuscript. All authors have reviewed the submitted manuscript and approve the manuscript for submission. SUMMARY STATEMENT Why is this review needed? • Post-traumatic stress disorder is a debilitating condition that is growing in prevalence and, if untreated or undertreated, can have significant impact on individuals, families, and ultimately the society at large. • Traditional treatment includes psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy; however, many who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder have limited access to these t...
Source: Issues in Mental Health Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Issues Ment Health Nurs Source Type: research

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Conclusion. The audio-digital recording method provides a useful second opinion that can affirm the need for a different treatment intervention in these anxious patients. A second live assessment would have required additional clinic time and added patient burden. The audio-digital recording method is less burdensome than live second opinion assessments and might have utility in both research and clinical practice settings. Keywords: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), anxiolytic medications, anxious symptoms, audio-digital recording, dual review, second opinions Anxiety symptoms are prevalent in most populations wher...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Original Research anxiolytic medications anxious symptoms audio-digital recording dual review Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) second opinions Source Type: research
AbstractThis is a program evaluation of treating sexual trauma in a residential substance abuse treatment program for women. Residents who were seeking treatment for their substance abuse disorder (SUD), also had a history of both childhood and adult sexual trauma. Given the literature supporting concurrent trauma-SUD treatment, the Warrior Renew (WR) protocol (Katz, Warrior Renew: Healing from military sexual trauma, Springer, New York, 2014) was added to the curriculum of Alcoholics Anonymous 12-step groups, relapse prevention, and substance abuse education classes. The WR manual consists of coping skills to address slee...
Source: Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
James Phelps’ new book, A Spectrum Approach to Mood Disorders: Not Fully Bipolar But Not Unipolar—Practical Management, is written for professionals, not laymen. I have some familiarity with bipolar disorder and its causes, symptoms, and treatments. However, I am not a professional and this book often goes beyond my ability to comprehend. Dr. Phelps has been treating patients and studying and writing about mood disorders for over 25 years, but he makes assumptions that the reader has a higher level of experience or training, and it makes this book difficult for amateurs to fully appreciate. The basic premise of...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Antidepressants Anxiety Attention Deficit Disorder Bipolar Book Reviews Borderline Personality Depression Disorders General Mood Stabilizers Postpartum Depression Professional Psychiatry Psychological Assessment Psychology PT Source Type: news
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition that occurs following a life-threatening event such as military combat, natural disasters, terrorist incidents, serious accidents, or physical or sexual assault. Approximately eight percent of all people will experience PTSD at some point in their life. That number rises to about 30 percent for combat veterans. Those suffering with PTSD may experience several different types of symptoms: Reliving. Becoming emotionally or physically upset when reminded or triggered. Nightmares and flashbacks are extremely common. Avoidance. Staying away from places or peop...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Anger Disorders General Marriage and Divorce Medications Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Relationships Trauma Anxiety Disorder Counseling Medicine Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Psychological Trauma Source Type: blogs
The buzz of the emergency department whirls around us as I pull my chair closer to the middle-aged woman sitting on the gurney. I know she was brought here by her concerned husband, who told the triage nurse she just has not been herself. Her husband is concerned about what she might do to herself, as she has struggled with depression for years. I introduce myself, and offer, “It sounds like things have been rough lately.” “I just can’t do it anymore,” the woman says. Tears spring to her eyes, and she reaches quickly for a tissue. “I tried to go to work, but I can’t focus. I’...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anxiety Book Reviews Depression General Interview Professional Psychological Assessment Psychotherapy PTSD 101 solution-focused questions series set Fredrike Bannink guides for psychotherapists guides for therapists how to help c Source Type: news
Studies on neuroplasticity have become increasingly popular in the last several years. It was once thought that our brain was fixed and unchanging once we enter adulthood. Research throughout the last few decades has determined that in fact, our brain has the ability to change and create new neural pathways as well as produce new neurons, a process labeled as neurogenesis (Doidge, 2015). This finding is significant because if the brain has this ability to change, we have the ability to change our way of thinking and possibly improve mood. Neural pathways in the brain are strengthened with repetition. One way to describe ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Abuse Disorders General Memory and Perception Psychotherapy PTSD Stress Treatment Brain Childhood Trauma EMDR Eye Movement Desensitization And Reprocessing Fight or Flight Frontal lobe Limbic System Nervous System Neural Pa Source Type: news
As the New Horizons spacecraft made its historic flight to Pluto and some scientists explored the far reaches of our solar system, others were making some incredible advances in their exploration of the inner workings of the mind.  Studies published this year shed light on the mysteries of the brain and human behavior, and began paving the way for new treatments to mental and neurological health problems, ranging from addiction to autism to Alzheimer's disease.  Here are eight fascinating things we learned about the human mind in 2015.  1. Smartphones are wildly distracting.  Americans are spending more...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
“Bernard also laughed; after two grams of soma the joke seemed, for some reason, good. Laughed and then, almost immediately, dropped off to sleep.” — Aldous Huxley, Brave New World It’s been a tough few years for benzodiazepines, the pharmaceutical industry’s top-selling family of prescription drugs. Tough in every way, that is, except sales: Xanax remains the world’s most popular pill, and U.S. prescriptions for it and other benzos grow by 12 percent every year. It’s their reputation, long enjoyed, as harmless and effective medicines that’s taking a flurry of hits — so...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Medication can be an effective approach for managing various types of anxiety such as panic, hyperarousal, and constant worry. However, contrary to popular belief and subtle messages from pharmaceutical companies, medication is far from a cure. In fact, when it comes to “cures” for most psychiatric conditions, the data tends to support psychotherapy. For example, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) responds very well to psychotherapy, whereas the positive effects of medication are somewhat limited. The same is true for panic disorder. Although certain types of medication are very good at relieving panic sympt...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anti-anxiety Antidepressants Benzodiazepines Disorders General Medications Panic Disorder anti-anxiety medications Drug Dependency Fear Hyperarousal Sedatives Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor snri Ssri Substance Abuse Source Type: news
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