CPX-351 Salvage Therapy Followed by Haplo-Cord Transplant for Relapsed/Refractory Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Conditions:   Myelodysplastic Syndromes;   Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute;   Leukemia, Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid;   Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Previously Treated Interventions:   Drug: CPX-351;   Drug: Fludarabine;   Drug: Melphalan;   Drug: Rabbit Anti-Human T-Lymphocyte Globulin;   Biological: Haplo-Cord Stem Cell Transplantation Sponsor:   Weill Medical College of Cornell University Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials

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Publication date: Available online 9 November 2017Source: Seminars in Cancer BiologyAuthor(s): Christian Flotho, Sebastian Sommer, Michael LübbertAbstractMyelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal bone marrow disorder, typically of older adults, which is characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral blood cytopenias and risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is an aggressive myeloproliferative neoplasm occurring in young children. The common denominator of these malignant myeloid disorders is the limited benefit of conventional chemotherapy and a particular resp...
Source: Seminars in Cancer Biology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: Journal of Geriatric Oncology, Volume 9, Issue 4Author(s): Marlise R. Luskin, Gregory A. AbelAbstractThe myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a varied group of hematologic neoplasms that lead to bone marrow failure, and also carry a risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Patients with MDS suffer significant impairments to both their quality of life and survival. Age is the dominant risk factor for the development of MDS, with a median age at diagnosis over 70 years. Consequently, patients with MDS frequently have concurrent comorbidities and/or frailty which may be coincident ...
Source: Journal of Geriatric Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
We report a case of myelodysplastic syndrome progressing to AML with calreticulin driver mutation in an adult male with TAR syndrome who was successfully treated with hematopoietic allogeneic stem cell transplantation.
Source: Hematology Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 November 2017Source: Seminars in Cancer BiologyAuthor(s): Christian Flotho, Sebastian Sommer, Michael LübbertAbstractMyelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal bone marrow disorder, typically of older adults, which is characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral blood cytopenias and risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is an aggressive myeloproliferative neoplasm occurring in young children. The common denominator of these malignant myeloid disorders is the limited benefit of conventional chemotherapy and a particular resp...
Source: Seminars in Cancer Biology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: Journal of Geriatric Oncology, Volume 9, Issue 4Author(s): Marlise R. Luskin, Gregory A. AbelAbstractThe myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a varied group of hematologic neoplasms that lead to bone marrow failure, and also carry a risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Patients with MDS suffer significant impairments to both their quality of life and survival. Age is the dominant risk factor for the development of MDS, with a median age at diagnosis over 70 years. Consequently, patients with MDS frequently have concurrent comorbidities and/or frailty which may be coincident ...
Source: Journal of Geriatric Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
We report a case of myelodysplastic syndrome progressing to AML with calreticulin driver mutation in an adult male with TAR syndrome who was successfully treated with hematopoietic allogeneic stem cell transplantation.
Source: Hematology Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Hematopoietic allogeneic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an accepted and potentially curative treatment for a variety of hematological diseases, immunodeficiencies and metabolic disorders1, with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) to date representing more than half of the indications in adult patients2. An HLA-matched related donor (MRD) is available for about 25% of patients, while the probability of finding a fully HLA-matched unrelated donor (MUD) varies on average between 60 and 90%3,4.
Source: Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation - Category: Hematology Authors: Source Type: research
Bone marrow failure and related syndromes are rare disorders characterized by ineffective bone marrow hematopoiesis and peripheral cytopenias. Although many are associated with characteristic clinical features, recent advances have shown a more complicated picture with a spectrum of broad and overlapping phenotypes and imperfect genotype – phenotype correlations. Distinguishing acquired from inherited forms of marrow failure can be challenging, but is of crucial importance given differences in the risk of disease progression to myelodysplastic syndrome, acute myeloid leukemia, and other malignancies, as well as the p...
Source: Seminars in Hematology - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is a potentially curative therapeutic option for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Disease relapse occurs in 35-45% of patients following alloSCT, and is the most frequent cause of treatment failure and mortality [1-4]. Moreover, relapse after alloSCT is associated with poor prognosis despite salvage chemotherapy, donor lymphocyte infusions, and/or second transplants [4].
Source: Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation - Category: Hematology Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractRecently, an immunodeficiency syndrome caused by guanine-adenine-thymine-adenine 2 (GATA2) deficiency has been described. The syndrome is characterized by (i) typical onset in early adulthood, (ii) profound peripheral blood cytopenias of monocytes, B lymphocytes, and NK cells, (iii) distinct susceptibility to disseminated non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) and other opportunistic infections (particularly human papillomavirus), and (iv) a high risk of developing hematologic malignancies (myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS); acute myeloid leukemias (AML)). Considerable clinical heterogeneity exists among patients withGA...
Source: Annals of Hematology - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
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