Vitamins in Pregnancy Linked to Less Autism in Offspring Vitamins in Pregnancy Linked to Less Autism in Offspring

Children of mothers who took folic acid or multivitamins before or during pregnancy were at lower risk for autism spectrum disorder, researchers say, but more research is needed.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Psychiatry Headlines - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

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A major study examining the fish-eating habits of pregnant women has found that they are not linked to autism or autistic traits in their children.
Source: University of Bristol news - Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: ; Faculty of Health Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news
(University of Bristol) A major study examining the fish-eating habits of pregnant women has found that they are not linked to autism or autistic traits in their children.Scientists at the University of Bristol looked at the assumption that mercury exposure during pregnancy is a major cause of autism using evidence from nearly 4500 women who took part in the Children of the 90s study.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
(BMJ. 2017;359:j4273) Previous research has suggested that autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may develop antenatally. Maternal nutrition affects neurodevelopment and could be a factor affecting the risk of developing ASD. Population-based studies, however, have produced conflicting results. Studies from the United States and Norway found that maternal folic acid supplementation around the time of conception and during early pregnancy decreased the risk of ASD. A Danish study, though, did not find an association between folic acid or multivitamin supplementation and the risk of ASD. The aim of this population-based cohort st...
Source: Obstetric Anesthesia Digest - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Epidemiologic Reports, Surveys Source Type: research
(BMJ. 2017;358:j3668) Antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are prescribed during pregnancy and are considered safe. Recent studies have raised concerns regarding the long-term neurodevelopmental effects, such as autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, of these medications on the offspring. However, gaps exist in the knowledge of antidepressant use during pregnancy and risk of psychiatric disorders in the offspring. This population-based cohort study was performed to investigate the association between in utero antidepressant exposure and overall risk of psychiatric disorders in children.
Source: Obstetric Anesthesia Digest - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Epidemiologic Reports, Surveys Source Type: research
Abstract Stimulation of the immune system during pregnancy, known as maternal immune activation (MIA), can cause long-lasting neurobiological and behavioral changes in the offspring. This phenomenon has been implicated in the etiology of developmental psychiatric disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia. Much of this evidence is predicated on animal models using bacterial agents such as LPS and/or viral mimics such as Poly I:C, both of which act through toll-like receptors. However, fewer studies have examined the role of direct activation of maternal T-cells during pregnancy using microbial agents. Bacterial s...
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Brain Behav Immun Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 May 2018 Source:Brain, Behavior, and Immunity Author(s): Ruthy Glass, Sara Norton, Nicholas Fox, Alexander W. Kusnecov Stimulation of the immune system during pregnancy, known as maternal immune activation (MIA), can cause long-lasting neurobiological and behavioral changes in the offspring. This phenomenon has been implicated in the etiology of developmental psychiatric disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia. Much of this evidence is predicated on animal models using bacterial agents such as LPS and/or viral mimics such as Poly I:C, both of which act through toll-like receptors....
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Low maternal FT4 was consistently associated with lower IQ across cohorts. Further studies should replicate the findings of autistic traits and investigate the potential modifying role of maternal iodine status. FT4 seems a reliable marker of fetal thyroid state in early pregnancy, regardless of the type of immunoassay. PMID: 29757392 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: J Clin Endocrinol Metab Source Type: research
This report would examine developments at the state and federal-level, court cases, and current views from stakeholders. Policy Questions Which states have PAS laws and what do those laws provide? What protections against abuse of PAS?What have the Supreme Court and lower courts held regarding individuals’ rights under PAS laws? The laws themselves?Is there evidence that persons with disabilities are being denied treatment by insurance companies but offered PAS instead, as NCD predicted?How is PAS viewed by disability organizations? Has this evolved in the past 13 years? If so why? If not, why?Are persons with disabi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs
Abstract Cytokines and chemokines are potent modulators of brain development and as such, dysregulation of the maternal immune system can result in deviations in the fetal cytokine balance, altering the course of typical brain development, and putting the individual on a "pathway to pathology". In the current study, we used a multi-variate approach to evaluate networks of interacting cytokines and investigated whether alterations in the maternal immune milieu could be linked to alcohol-related and alcohol-independent child neurodevelopmental delay. This was achieved through the measurement of 40 cytokine...
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Brain Behav Immun Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 5 May 2018 Source:Brain, Behavior, and Immunity Author(s): Tamara S. Bodnar, Charlis Raineki, Wladimir Wertelecki, Lyubov Yevtushok, Larisa Plotka, Natalya Zymak-Zakutnya, Gordon Honerkamp-Smith, Alan Wells, Matthieu Rolland, Todd S. Woodward, Claire D. Coles, Julie A. Kable, Christina D. Chambers, Joanne Weinberg Cytokines and chemokines are potent modulators of brain development and as such, dysregulation of the maternal immune system can result in deviations in the fetal cytokine balance, altering the course of typical brain development, and putting the individual on a “pathway ...
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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