Ataxia, Ophthalmoplegia, and Impairment of Consciousness in a 19-Month-Old American Boy

A 19-month-old, white, Pennsylvanian boy, with an unremarkable medical history, presented to our hospital with a 3-week history of nonbloody, nonbilious emesis up to 5 times a day and nonbloody diarrhea. Ten days before admission, his gait became progressively unsteady, until he finally refused to walk. A day before admission, he found it difficult to move his eyes. The patient was hypoactive. History, physical and neurologic examination, blood and cerebrospinal (CSF) fluid studies, and neuroimaging studies ruled out the most frequent causes of acute ataxia. The etiology of bilateral, complete ophthalmoplegia was also taken into consideration. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of bilateral thalami and mammillary bodies provided diagnostic clues. Additional history and specific tests established the final diagnosis and treatment plan. The patient improved to a normal neurologic state. This case provides important practical information about an unusual malnutrition cause of acute ataxia, particularly in young children of developing countries.
Source: Seminars in Pediatric Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research

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Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
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Source: Documenta Ophthalmologica - Category: Opthalmology Source Type: research
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Source: European Journal of Medical Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Eur J Med Genet Source Type: research
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Source: Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Clinical Neuroradiology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: Indian Journal of Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine - Category: Bioinformatics Source Type: research
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Source: The Cerebellum - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: Cerebellum - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cerebellum Source Type: research
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Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Illustrative Cases Source Type: research
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