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Invicta Medical raises $21m for sleep apnea device

Sleep apnea device developer Invicta Medical has raised approximately $21 million in a new round of equity financing, according to an SEC filing posted this week. The Palo Alto, Calif.-based company, founded in 2013, has not yet revealed the technology behind its development but claims that its solution to treating obstructive sleep apnea is non-invasive, customizable to meet patient needs and affordable, according to its website. The company has not yet officially stated how it plans to spend funds raised in the round. The round was joined by 6 anonymous investors, with the first sale in the round dated on December 20, 2017, according to the SEC filing. The post Invicta Medical raises $21m for sleep apnea device appeared first on MassDevice.
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business/Financial News Respiratory invictamedical Source Type: news

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We describe a three‐generation family case series with a heterozygous ∼5.1 Mb novel contiguous gene deletion of chromosome 2p22.3‐p22.2 involving 11 genes, including LTBP1. The deletion has been identified in the proband, father and grandfather, who all have a phenotype consistent with a TAAS. Findings include thoracic aortic dilation, ptosis, malar hypoplasia, high arched palate, retrognathia, pes planus, hindfoot deformity, obstructive sleep apnea, and low truncal tone during childhood with joint laxity that progressed to reduced joint mobility over time. While the three affected individuals did not meet c...
Source: American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
Conclusion: Although the increase of index is not a side effect in all patients, the risk in those who experimented it can determinate an important aggravation of a medic condition. It ´s possible that there´s There may be a contraindication in the use of stabilization splints in patients with sleep respiratory disorders.
Source: Revista clinica de periodoncia, implantologia y rehabilitacion oral - Category: Dentistry Source Type: research
We read with interest the comments by Binar et  al on our paper.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
We recently read the article by Losurdo et  al published in the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases.1 The authors suggest that both obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and dysphagia are highly prevalent in first-ever, ischemic stroke, and these pathologies are associated in acute ischemic stroke. This is an interesting study, and the o utcomes of the study are important for not only neurological sciences but also sleep medicine. We would like to emphasize 2 important issues regarding this article that should be taken into consideration.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
Purpose of review There is a high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the surgical population, however, a significant proportion of patients are undiagnosed. The Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine (SASM) has issued recent guidelines for preoperative assessment and preparation of patients with known or suspected OSA. The purpose of this review is to highlight key points in the new guidelines and explore the possibilities of different strategies in optimizing patients with OSA preoperatively. Recent findings Recent knowledge on phenotypes and endotypes has provided a better understanding of the disease ...
Source: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: MORBID OBESITY AND SLEEP APNEA: Edited by Frances F. Chung Source Type: research
Purpose of review Increasing numbers of bariatric surgical procedures and the high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in this population have resulted in a growing interest in the perioperative management of OSA in bariatric surgery. This review provides a summary of the first consensus guideline on this topic as well as an update of the newest literature available. Recent findings All bariatric patients should be screened for OSA and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) to reduce the risk of perioperative complications. Intraoperative precautions are preoxygenation, induction and intubation in ramped posit...
Source: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: MORBID OBESITY AND SLEEP APNEA: Edited by Frances F. Chung Source Type: research
Purpose of review The primary objective of this review is to identify the risk factors for opioid-induced respiratory depression (OIRD) in the postoperative period. Recent findings In the postoperative period, OIRD has often been reported resulting in morbidity and mortality. The risk factors which predispose surgical patients to increased risk of OIRD are not clearly defined. A literature search was performed for adult surgical patients who were prescribed opioids during their hospital stay and any available reports on postoperative respiratory depression/respiratory events. Summary Elderly, female sex, presence o...
Source: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: MORBID OBESITY AND SLEEP APNEA: Edited by Frances F. Chung Source Type: research
Purpose of review Provide a practical update on drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) for anesthesia providers, which can also serve as a reference for those preparing to establish a DISE program. Recent findings New developments in surgical approaches to OSA and the growing global incidence of the condition have stimulated increased interest and demand for drug-induced sleep endoscopy. New techniques include transoral robotic surgery and hypoglossal nerve stimulation. Recent DISE literature has sought to address numerous debates including relevance of DISE findings to those during physiologic sleep and the most appropr...
Source: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: MORBID OBESITY AND SLEEP APNEA: Edited by Frances F. Chung Source Type: research
Purpose of review Allergic rhinitis and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) are common disorders, which have been considered as potential risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This review summarizes the proposed underlying pathophysiological mechanisms to provide a better understanding of the relationship between these conditions. Recent findings In adults, allergic rhinitis and NAR may be considered as symptoms potentiating, rather than risk potentiating factors in the pathophysiology of OSA, whereas in children, these are considered to be independent predictors for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and failure of ad...
Source: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: RHINITIS, SINUSITIS AND UPPER AIRWAY DISEASE: Edited by Ruby Pawankar and David P. Skoner Source Type: research
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a main cause of excessive daytime sleepiness and increases the risk for driving accidents, which can be normalized by treatment with continuous positive airway pressure ventilation. Since it is estimated that OSA is not dia...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news
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