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The prognostic value of circulating myeloblasts in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

AbstractThe prognostic value of peripheral blasts (PB) is not well-studied in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We evaluated the impact of PB on overall survival (OS) and transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a large cohort. The MDS database at the Moffitt Cancer Center was retrospectively reviewed to identify patients with ≥ 1% PB (PB-MDS) and those without PB (BM-MDS). We also assessed the correlation between PB and gene mutations. One thousand seven hundred fifty-eight patients were identified, among whom 13% had PB near the time of diagnosis. PB-MDS patients were more likely to be younger with trilineage cytope nia, complex karyotype, higher-risk disease, transfusion dependence, and therapy-related MDS. The rate of AML transformation was 49 vs. 26% (p 
Source: Annals of Hematology - Category: Hematology Source Type: research

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Cancer, EarlyView.
Source: Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
April 11, 2018—(BRONX, NY)—In a study published online today in Science Translational Medicine,Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers report that an experimental peptide (small protein) drug shows promise against the often-lethal cancer acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and describe how the drug works at the molecular level. The findings have led to a Phase I/II clinical trial for patients with advanced AML and advanced myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), now underway atMontefiore Health System.
Source: Einstein News - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that responders and non-responders have distinct miRNA patterns and that the level of specific miRNAs before therapy may predict the efficacy of AZA treatment. PMID: 29630523 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cancer Biomarkers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cancer Biomark Source Type: research
(Albert Einstein College of Medicine) In a study published online today in Science Translational Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers report that an experimental peptide (small protein) drug shows promise against the often-lethal cancer acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and describe how the drug works at the molecular level. The findings have led to a Phase I/II clinical trial for patients with advanced AML and advanced myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), now underway at Montefiore Health System.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
ConclusionsThe novel t(7;13)(p14;q12)/PAN3–PSMA2 in the neoplastic bone marrow cells could affect two key protein complex: (a) the PAN2/PAN3 complex (PAN3 rearrangement) which is responsible for deadenylation, the process of removing the poly(A) tail from RNA, and (b) the proteasome (PSMA2 rearrangement) which is responsible for degradation of intracellular proteins. The patient showed a favorable response to decitabine after treatment with 5-azacitidine and conventional intensive chemotherapy had failed. Whether this might represent a consistent feature of MDS/AML with this particular gene fusion, remains unknown.
Source: Experimental Hematology and Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Contributors : Hiroyoshi Kunimoto ; Cem Meydan ; Francine E Garrett-Bakelman ; Caroline Sheridan ; Tak Lee ; Yaseswini Neelamraju ; Ari Melnick ; Ross L LevineSeries Type : Methylation profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Mus musculusRecent studies using next-generation sequencing technology have uncovered mutational landscapes of various myeloid malignancies (Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network, 2013; Yoshida et al., 2011). These genetic data revealed novel classes of mutations that commonly occur in patients with myeloid malignancies, including epigenetic regulators and spliceosomal genes. In addition, co-o...
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Methylation profiling by high throughput sequencing Mus musculus Source Type: research
Contributors : Hiroyoshi Kunimoto ; Cem Meydan ; Francine E Garrett-Bakelman ; Caroline Sheridan ; Tak Lee ; Yaseswini Neelamraju ; Ari Melnick ; Ross L LevineSeries Type : Expression profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Mus musculusRecent studies using next-generation sequencing technology have uncovered mutational landscapes of various myeloid malignancies (Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network, 2013; Yoshida et al., 2011). These genetic data revealed novel classes of mutations that commonly occur in patients with myeloid malignancies, including epigenetic regulators and spliceosomal genes. In addition, co-oc...
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing Mus musculus Source Type: research
We report the first phase 1 findings of BP1001. Methods In this single-centre, open-label, dose-escalation phase 1/1b trial, we enrolled participants (aged ≥18 years) with refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia, Philadelphia-chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukaemia (in chronic, accelerated, or blast phase), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome, at MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX, USA). We used a 3 + 3 dose escalation strategy, with at least three patients enrolled at each dose level. We administered BP1001 intravenously, twice weekly, for 28 days, with a starting dose of 5 m...
Source: The Lancet Haematology - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
Therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MN) are defined as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) developing after exposure to cytotoxic agents or radiation therapy for unrelated malignancies, and classified into a subgroup of AML in the WHO classification [1]. Therapy-related AML (t-AML) was identified in about 7% of large-scale population-based AML registries, whereas the risk of t-MN is reportedly increasing, possibly because of the change in therapeutic strategies for malignant diseases [2 –5].
Source: Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Conclusion: The prevalence of PHD after PRRT with 177Lu-DOTATATE was 4% in our patient population. The median time at which PHD developed was 41 mo after the first PRRT cycle. The relative risk for developing a hematopoietic neoplasm was 2.7. No risk factors were found for the development of PHD in GEP NET patients.
Source: Journal of Nuclear Medicine - Category: Nuclear Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Source Type: research
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