Artificial Intelligence in Medicine: Hope or Hype?

The use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) is on the rise in the technology sector and has become a buzz-worthy topic in many corners of our digital world. The application of AI in the medical field holds great promise for improving patient health, but will doctors and patients feel comfortable using it? Young startups have begun leveraging this technology to prove better health outcomes, but there's still a lot to do before we'll see AI used pervasively in the clinic. Current Landscape To date, the sweet spot in healthcare AI has been pairing algorithms with structured exercises in reading patient data and medical images to train machines to detect abnormalities. This training is called “deep learning.” In the same way, algorithms are being used to sift through vast amounts of medical literature to inform treatment decisions where it would be too onerous a task to have a human read through the same journals. Companies like MedyMatch and Viz are doing just that. They’re using proprietary algorithms and applying deep learning to aid physicians in making faster diagnoses of strokes in emergency treatment situations. Their algorithms produce an output by ingesting patient CT scans and using the programmed deep learning to aid in the diagnosis of a stroke. Advancement in this particular instance is especially significant because receiving appropriate treatment quickly has a big impact on patient outcomes. Learn more about the hype vs. the reality of artificial int...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Software Source Type: news

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This study investigated the frequency of and risk factors for preoperative carotid artery stenosis to determine whether CAS with ultrasonography contributes to preventing postoperative stroke or cardiovascular comorbidities in lung cancer patients.MethodsThis retrospective study included 1,676 consecutive lung cancer patients who underwent surgical resection.ResultsOf the 1,342 patients who underwent CAS, 173 (12.9%) had carotid artery stenosis. Significant associations with carotid artery stenosis were found for older patients (p
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
Young Americans are dying in rising numbers because of drugs, alcohol and suicide, according to new federal data. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) issued its annual comprehensive health and mortality report, which analyzes trends in death rates by cause and demographic. Drugs, alcohol and suicide, the report says, have contributed to the first drops in U.S. life expectancy since 1993. While U.S. life expectancy rose from 77.8 to 78.6 years between 2006 and 2016, the trend reversed during the end of the decade, leading to a 0.3-year decline between 2014 and ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news
Young Americans are dying in rising numbers because of drugs, alcohol and suicide, according to new federal data. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) issued its annual comprehensive health and mortality report, which analyzes trends in death rates by cause and demographic. Drugs, alcohol and suicide, the report says, have contributed to the first drops in U.S. life expectancy since 1993. While U.S. life expectancy rose from 77.8 to 78.6 years between 2006 and 2016, the trend reversed during the end of the decade, leading to a 0.3-year decline between 2014 and ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news
(Imperial College London) People in the UK, US and China have a higher risk of dying early from conditions like cancer, heart disease and stroke than people in Italy, France, South Korea and Australia.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
AbstractBreakdown of the blood –brain barrier (BBB) or inner blood–retinal barrier (BRB), induced by pathologically elevated levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or other mediators, can lead to vasogenic edema and significant clinical problems such as neuronal morbidity and mortality, or vision loss. Restoratio n of the barrier function with corticosteroids in the brain, or by blocking VEGF in the eye are currently the predominant treatment options for brain edema and diabetic macular edema, respectively. However, corticosteroids have side effects, and VEGF has important neuroprotective, vascular...
Source: Fluids and Barriers of the CNS - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Aspirin is arguably a calorie restriction mimetic, able to spur some of the same beneficial cellular stress responses that are activated by low nutrient levels. Calorie restriction itself, practiced over the long term, does not have a very large effect on human life span. Given the existing demographic data, a gain of even five years of life would be very surprising. Further, it is well established that the life extension resulting from calorie restriction scales down as species life span scales up. Mice live up to 40% longer on calorie restricted diets, but we humans certainly don't. Aspirin has other effects besid...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
For years, taking a daily aspirin was believed to be one of the easiest ways to protect long-term health. But the bottom line on aspirin has recently gotten more complicated. Some research finds that aspirin can potentially reduce the risk of heart attacks and cancer, and some suggests that aspirin’s possible side effects, such as bleeding and ulcers, overshadow its advantages for many people. Now, a trio of new research articles are calling that classic health advice further into question. The research, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, suggests that taking a daily aspirin offers few appreciable heal...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime Source Type: news
Aspirin is once again in the headlines, prompted by New England Journal of Medicine reports suggesting that people aged 70 years and older obtain no benefit and perhaps experience harm in the form of increased bleeding and increased death from cancer on low-dose aspirin. This adds to the decades-long debate on whether aspirin is beneficial as a preventive measure against cardiovascular events such as heart attack in which a blood clot forms on top of inflamed atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries. Unlike many other studies that are observational and therefore virtually useless, these studies are prospective and r...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates aspirin coronary grain-free heart attack heart disease Inflammation platelets Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Millions take aspirin to prevent heart attacks, strokes and cancer. New research shows older people in good health may not need it — and should not start taking it.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Aspirin Preventive Medicine Heart Elderly Colon and Colorectal Cancer Stroke Dementia New England Journal of Medicine Source Type: news
Millions take aspirin to prevent heart attacks, strokes and cancer. New research shows older people in good health may not need it — and should not start taking it.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Aspirin Preventive Medicine Heart Elderly Colon and Colorectal Cancer Stroke Dementia New England Journal of Medicine Source Type: news
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