Advocates for Children ’s Health: Working Together to Reduce Harmful Environmental Exposures

PDF Version (4.5 MB) About This Article Published: 2 January 2018 Note to readers with disabilities: EHP strives to ensure that all journal content is accessible to all readers. However, some figures and Supplemental Material published in EHP articles may not conform to 508 standards due to the complexity of the information being presented. If you need assistance accessing journal content, please contact ehponline@niehs.nih.gov. Our staff will work with you to assess and meet your accessibility needs within 3 working days. With increasing rates of childhood cancers, neurodevelopmental disorders, and other illnesses often related to environmental exposures, some believe that children are modern-day canaries in the coal mine. Numerous major studies around the world have been designed specifically to address children’s environmental health. In the United States, the 1997 signing of Executive Order 13045, which charged federal agencies with identifying and assessing children’s environmental health risks,1 was the catalyst that really launched this area of research. The order spurred the creation of multiple federally funded research programs, including the Children’s Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Centers Program,2 the Children’s Health Exposure Analysis Resource,3 and the Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes program.4 The 1966 establishment of the National Institutes of Health Division of Environ...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Focus Source Type: research

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Conclusions: Peroral arsenic has little effect on local airway immune responses to bacteria but compromises respiratory epithelial barrier integrity, increasing systemic translocation of inhaled pathogens and small molecules. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1878 Received: 09 March 2017 Revised: 14 August 2017 Accepted: 16 August 2017 Published: 28 September 2017 Address correspondence to M.B. Fessler, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 111 T.W. Alexander Dr., P.O. Box 12233, Maildrop D2-01, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 USA. Telephone: (919) 541-3701. Email: fesslerm@niehs.nih.gov *Current address: UN...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: Maternal exposure to indoor environmental NO2 causes allergic asthma-related consequences in offspring absent any subsequent lung provocation and potentiates the symptoms of allergic asthma in adult offspring following postnatal allergic sensitization and challenge; this response is associated with the Th2-based immune response and DNA methylation of the IL4 gene. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP685 Received: 19 June 2016 Revised: 07 June 2017 Accepted: 19 June 2017 Published: 13 September 2017 Address correspondence to N. Sang, College of Environment and Resource, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006, P...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusion: To address the many challenges posed by EDCs, we argue that Africans should take the lead in prioritization and evaluation of environmental hazards, including EDCs. We recommend the institution of education and training programs for chemical users, adoption of the precautionary principle, establishment of biomonitoring programs, and funding of community-based epidemiology and wildlife research programs led and funded by African institutes and private companies. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1774 Received: 16 February 2017 Revised: 22 May 2017 Accepted: 24 May 2017 Published: 22 August 2017 Address correspond...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
Conclusions: This study suggests that elemental sulfur use, allowed in both organic and conventional farming, in close proximity to residential areas, may adversely affect children’s respiratory health. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP528 Received: 19 May 2016 Revised: 05 May 2017 Accepted: 09 May 2017 Published: 14 August 2017 Address correspondence to R. Raanan, Center for Environmental Research and Children’s Health (CERCH), University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health, 1995 University Ave., Suite 265, Berkeley, CA 94704 USA. Telephone: (510) 642-9431. Email: rachelraananrr@gmail.com Supplem...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: Follow-up of offspring will determine the potential long-term consequences of lower weight and adiposity at birth associated with prenatal PFAS exposure. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP641 Received: 10 June 2016 Revised: 30 November 2016 Accepted: 13 December 2016 Published: 26 June 2017 Address correspondence to A. P. Starling, Dept. of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, 12474 E. 19th Ave, Campus Box F426, Aurora, CO 80045 USA. Telephone: 303-724-8483. Email: anne.starling@ucdenver.edu Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi.org/10....
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Author Affiliations open 1Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden 2European Institute for Systems Biology and Medicine, CNRS-ENS-UCBL, Université de Lyon, Lyon, France 3Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden 4Department of Paediatrics, Sachs’ Children’s Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden 5Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden PDF Version (136 KB) Abstract About This Article Supplemental Material Background: Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution can lead ...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Author Affiliations open 1Infectious Diseases Division, icddr,b (International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh), Dhaka, Bangladesh 2Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden 3Maternal and Child Health Division, icddr,b, Dhaka, Bangladesh 4Department of Clinical Trial and Clinical Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan PDF Version (995 KB) Abstract About This Article Supplemental Material Background: Early-life arsenic exposure has been associated with reduced cell-mediated immunity, but little is known about its effects o...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusion: Going beyond the powerful scientific and economic arguments for urgent action to reduce the burning of fossil fuels is the strong moral imperative to protect our most vulnerable populations. Citation: Perera FP. 2017. Multiple threats to child health from fossil fuel combustion: impacts of air pollution and climate change. Environ Health Perspect 125:141–148; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP299 Address correspondence to F.P. Perera, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 722 West 168th St. ...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Commentaries Children's Health February 2017 Source Type: research
This article provides an overview of public health efforts by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) during the past two decades to protect children’s health from environmental hazards. It highlights examples of concrete steps and accomplishments toward improving environmental protection and health outcomes achieved through public policy, rules and regulations, increased scientific understanding, and public health messaging. Additionally, examples of future challenges for better understanding and improving children’s environmental health are discussed. Citation: Firestone M, Berger M, Foos B, Etzel R....
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Perspectives Brief Communications Children's Health December 2016 Source Type: research
Persistent health disparities are a major contributor to disproportionate burden of cancer for some populations. Health disparities in cancer incidence and mortality may reflect differences in exposures to risk factors early in life. Understanding the distribution of exposures to early life risk and protective factors for cancer across different populations can shed light on opportunities to promote health equity at earlier developmental stages. Disparities may differentially influence risk for cancer during early life and create opportunities to promote health equity. Potential risk and protective factors for cancer in ea...
Source: PEDIATRICS - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Supplement Article Source Type: research
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