Penn Vet's Boris Striepen receives $1.8m grant to fight deadly diarrheal disease in infants

(University of Pennsylvania) Boris Striepen, PhD, Professor of Pathobiology at the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has received a $1.8-million, three-year grant from the Bill&Melinda Gates Foundation to enable the development of drugs for cryptosporidiosis, a diarrheal disease caused by microscopic parasites.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

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Malaria and cryptosporidiosis, caused by apicomplexan parasites, remain major drivers of global child mortality. New drugs for the treatment of malaria and cryptosporidiosis, in particular, are of high priority; however, there are few chemically validated targets. The natural product cladosporin is active against blood- and liver-stage Plasmodium falciparum and Cryptosporidium...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Biological Sciences Source Type: research
ký D, Kopacz Z, McEvoy J, Kváč M Abstract Cryptosporidiosis is a common parasitic infection in birds that is caused by more than 25 Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. Many of the genotypes that cause avian cryptosporidiosis are poorly characterized. The genetic and biological characteristics of avian genotype III are described here and these data support the establishment of a new species, Cryptosporidium proventriculi. Faecal samples from the orders Passeriformes and Psittaciformes were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium by microscopy and sequencing, and infections were detected in 10...
Source: European Journal of Protistology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Eur J Protistol Source Type: research
by Karine Sonzogni-Desautels, Thomas Z. Di Lenardo, Axel E. Renteria, Marc-Andr é Gascon, Timothy G. Geary, Momar Ndao Cryptosporidiosis caused by the protozoan parasitesCryptosporidium hominis andC.parvum, threatens the lives of young children in developing countries. In veterinary medicine,C.parvum causes life-threatening diarrhea and dehydration in newborn dairy calves. Protocols to detectCryptosporidium spp. oocysts using flow cytometry have been reported; however, these protocols use antibodies against the parasite and typically focus on detection of oocysts, not quantification. These techniques are not well-s...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
In this study, an explant culture was used  as an in vitro model of buffalo intestine to evaluate the effect of Moringa leaves extract onCryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) oocysts using light and scanning electron microscopy and measuring IFN- γ, IL-12 and IL-14 in the culture supernatants.C. parvum oocysts were collected from naturally-infected calf feces, isolated, excysted and then co-inoculated with ileal tissue explants culture medium. The prepared Moringa leaves extract was then introduced to the infected tissues in the concentrations of 100  mg/ml and 300 mg/ml. After 24 h, tissues were col...
Source: Journal of Parasitic Diseases - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
Abstract Marine bivalve shellfish are of public health interest because they can accumulate pollutants in their tissues. As they are usually consumed raw or lightly cooked, they are considered to be a possible source of foodborne infections, including giardiosis and cryptosporidiosis. Although data indicating contamination of shellfish with Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts have been published, comparing results from different studies is difficult, as there is no standardized protocol for the detection and quantification of these parasites in mussels, and different researchers have used different analytica...
Source: International Journal of Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Int J Food Microbiol Source Type: research
Abstract With the rise of global migration, international trade, and global environmental challenges such as climate change, it is not surprising that the interactions between humans and other animals are shifting. Salient infectious diseases, such as malaria and HIV (which have high burdens of disease), attract sophisticated public health frameworks and funding from global/regional organisations, such as the WHO. This unfortunately detracts attention from the many emerging zoonoses that fall under the radar as neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). This review considers the available literature and the attribution o...
Source: Topics in HIV Medicine - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Trop Med Infect Dis Source Type: research
Abstract Cryptosporidiosis is one of the leading causes of moderate to severe diarrhea in children in low-resource settings. The therapeutic options for cryptosporidiosis are limited to one drug, nitazoxanide, which unfortunately has poor activity in the most needy populations of malnourished children and HIV infected persons. This paper describes the discovery and early optimization of a class of imidazopyridine-containing compounds with potential for treating Cryptosporidium infections. The compounds target the Cryptosporidium methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS), an enzyme that is essential for protein synthesis. ...
Source: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Antimicrob Agents Chemother Source Type: research
This study reports for the first time the molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in Salmo trutta. A total number of 613 brown trout was captured by local anglers in 44 Galician rivers within 10 river basins (NW Spain) during the 2015 fishing season (March-August) and classified into groups according to their size. The gastrointestinal tracts were dissected and differentiated in pyloric ceca and intestine, which were homogenized and concentrated in phosphate-buffered saline 0.04 M pH 7.2/diethyl ether (2:1). Cryptosporidium oocysts were observed by immunofluorescence microscopy in 103 of 613 specimens (16.8%), w...
Source: The Journal of Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: J Parasitol Source Type: research
Globally cryptosporidiosis is one of the commonest causes of mortality in children under 24 months old and may be associated with important longterm health effects. Whilst most strains of Cryptosporidium parvum a...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
is AD Abstract Cryptosporidium is a genus of single celled parasites capable of infecting a wide range of animals including humans. Cryptosporidium species are members of the phylum apicomplexa, which includes well-known genera such as Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. Cryptosporidium parasites cause a severe gastro-intestinal disease known as cryptosporidiosis. They are one of the most common causes of childhood diarrhoea worldwide, and infection can have prolonged detrimental effects on the development of children, but also can be life threatening to HIV/AIDS patients and transplant recipients. A variety of hosts can a...
Source: Experimental Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: Exp Parasitol Source Type: research
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