Book Review: The Diagnostic System

While it’s true that many illnesses are foreign to the average person, many of the core symptoms of mental illness are familiar to virtually everyone. “Not only does the public have a reasonable sense about what the symptoms of mental illness feel like, it also has some intuitive grasp about what causes them,” writes Jason Schnittker. In his new book, The Diagnostic System: Why The Classification Of Psychiatric Disorders Is Necessary, Difficult, And Never Settled, Schnittker explores the evolution of the manual we use to understand mental illness – the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. Schnittker explores the often confusing and seemingly contradictory processes of defining criteria of mental illnesses, helping readers appreciate that a fluid approach is an adaptive strength of mental health professionals, and one that is necessary to boost our understanding of mental illness. To understand how we develop a framework for understanding mental illness, we must appreciate that the way clinicians, scientists, and the public think about mental illness seek to serve different needs, yet cannot be segregated. “The science of psychiatric disorders, for example, proceeds from how clinicians define disorders. And controversies surrounding how the public understand mental illness have corollaries in debates surrounding how scientists conceptualize mental illness,” writes Schnittker. Yet clinicians themselves rarely agree on diagnoses. Schnittker poin...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Book Reviews Disorders Dual Diagnosis General Medications Policy and Advocacy Professional Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment diagnosis system diagnostic system mental diagnosis Mental Disorders Psychiatric Disorde Source Type: news

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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior General Memory and Perception The Psych Central Show Cognitive Distortion Dr John Grohol Gabe Howard Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs
The three leading regulatory bodies for the counselling and psychotherapy profession have created a new competence framework as a response to the mental health crisisSuzanne Moore is right (We can talk about self-care, but this mental health crisis is political, 26 November) that counselling and psychotherapy is about talking and that “it is better to talk about things rather than not”. Addressing the mental health crisis is one of the most challenging tasks faced by us all and counselling and psychotherapy have an important role to play in providing a solution. As the three leading regulatory bodies for the co...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Mental health Psychology Education Science Society Depression Anxiety Post-traumatic stress disorder Bipolar disorder Schizophrenia Source Type: news
Authors: Philipp R, Kriston L, Lanio J, Kühne F, Härter M, Moritz S, Meister R Abstract We evaluated the effectiveness and acceptability of metacognitive interventions for mental disorders. We searched electronic databases and included randomized and non-randomized controlled trials comparing metacognitive interventions with other treatments in adults with mental disorders. Primary effectiveness and acceptability outcomes were symptom severity and dropout, respectively. We performed random-effects meta-analyses. We identified Metacognitive Training (MCTrain), Metacognitive Therapy (MCTherap) and Metacogni...
Source: Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Clin Psychol Psychother Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2018Source: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological PsychiatryAuthor(s): Aakash V. Sathappan, Bruce M. Luber, Sarah H. LisanbyAbstractPharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS)1 each show efficacy in the treatment of psychiatric disorders; however, more efficacious interventions are needed as reflected by an overall unmet need in mental health care. While each modality has typically been studied and developed as a monotherapy, in practice they are typically used in combination. Research has begun to emerge studying the potential synergi...
Source: Progress in Neuro Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
A federal judge on Monday ruled that the government must obtain parental or guardian consent before administering psychotropic drugs—those that can affect the brain or behavior—to migrant children in its care. But plenty of questions still remain about what these drugs do to young brains in the first place. “The benefits or risks of psychotropic medications to brain development are only beginning to be evaluated,” says Dr. Manpreet Singh, director of the Pediatric Mood Disorders Program at Stanford University. “We haven’t actually looked, directly and in systematic ways, at the effects o...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime onetime Source Type: news
Conclusion We believe our diagnosis of schizo-obsessive disorder in the described patient is appropriate due to his symptoms of schizophrenia and OCD. The OCS at first seemed to have retarded the psychotic manifestation; however, the negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia associated with OCS were prominent, and we believe this greatly contributed to the poor prognosis of our patient. The improvement of his OCS occurred with the emergence of an over-valued idea, corroborating the existence of a schizo-obsessive spectrum modulated by the presence and extent of phenomenological features related to insight. Therefore...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Case Report Current Issue Neurodegenerative Disease Schizophrenia comorbidity insight obsessive compulsive disorder Source Type: research
In this study, almost 80 percent of the participants responded positively after an average of less than four treatment sessions. The symptoms remained alleviated after two months.[1] In a randomized, controlled trial by Kip et al,[2] 57 U.S. service members/veterans with combat-related PTSD were treated with either the ART-based psychotherapy or an attention control (AC) regimen. The ART was delivered in 3.7±1.1 sessions with a 94-percent completion rate. The investigators reported that mean reductions in symptoms of PTSD, depression, anxiety, and trauma-related guilt were significantly greater (p
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Commentary Current Issue Practice Management Accelerated resolution therapy art cognitive processing therapy CPT ethical principles informed consent patient autonomy posttraumatic stress disorder PTSD Source Type: research
I have previously written about the possible benefits of using virtual reality (VR) in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Now it seems that virtual-reality based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has more wide-reaching benefits and can help reduce momentary paranoia and anxiety, as well as improve social cognition in individuals with psychotic disorders. In a February 2018 study published in The Lancet (Psychiatry), researchers conducted a randomized controlled trial of personalized virtual-reality based cognitive-behavioral therapy in 116 patients with a DSM IV-diagnosed psychotic disorder and paranoid...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Antipsychotic Anxiety and Panic Psychology Psychotherapy Schizophrenia Technology Treatment CBT Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Paranoia Psychosis Psychotic Disorder virtual reality Source Type: blogs
DiscussionWhile limited by the small number of patients, such findings are nonetheless already supporting the hypothesis of the superiority of VRT on auditory verbal hallucinations. As expected, a moderate effect is found for our adapted short CBT for psychosis, though not significant at this point. The current trial will contribute to the validation of a novel innovative approach answering a fundamental clinical need.
Source: Schizophrenia Bulletin - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Bipolar disorder is a difficult illness. It affects everything. In addition to affecting your mood, it affects your judgment, concentration, memory, energy and sleep. It affects your relationships. It affects your everyday. It can bring about a deep, sinking despair, or jolt you into a euphoric state where your brain literally can’t compute the consequences of your actions. Some people experience depressive and manic symptoms at the same time—darkness, distorted thoughts and fatigue followed by restlessness, racing thoughts and irritability. It can feel so overwhelming. However, this doesn’t mean you&rsqu...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Psychotherapy Self-Help Sleep Stress Treatment being healthy with bipolar Bipolar Disorder bipolar disorder books bipolar disorder treatment Depressive Episode hope and bipolar disorder managing bipola Source Type: news
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