Stereotypic Movement Disorders

This review summarizes motor stereotypies in terms of diagnosis, description, prevalence, pathophysiology and management. Stereotypies are fixed and chronic movements. Stereotypies begin before 3 years of age and continue into adulthood. Primary motor stereotypies occur in children of normal intelligence whereas secondary stereotypies occur in the setting of an additional diagnosis such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or other neurologic disorders. They are highly associated with co-morbidities such as anxiety, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, inattention, and tics.
Source: Seminars in Pediatric Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research

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It is intuitive to expect youth with IBD will have higher rates of depression and anxiety than their otherwise healthy peers, and most research bears this notion. However, existing literature of emotional distress has not consistently addressed the differentiation between general depression and anxiety and normative emotional experiences of IBD. Assessment measures often used for youth with IBD align with the DSM criteria; based on symptoms, without considering etiology or context (e.g., chronic disease).
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Quality of Life/Psychosocial Care Source Type: research
Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can have knowledge gaps regarding their disease and its management, which may lead to anxiety and reduced quality of life. They often use social media as a tool to seek information and manage their chronic disease. The goal of this study was to develop a series of educational videos optimized for social media that are informed by patient insights and address their experiences, concerns, and unmet educational needs.
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Quality of Life/Psychosocial Care Source Type: research
While restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) is the preferred surgical approach in patients with medically refractory ulcerative colitis (UC) or UC-related dysplasia, a significant proportion of patients develop pouchitis and/or report decreased health related quality of life (HRQOL) at some point after IPAA. We designed this study to 1) evaluate the association between recently reported pouchitis and specific Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) domains (anxiety, depression, fatigue, pain interference, sleep disturbance, and social role satisfaction) and HRQOL as a...
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Quality of Life/Psychosocial Care Source Type: research
Crohn ’s disease (CD) is a chronic, immune-mediated condition associated with abdominal pain, psychological comorbidities, and reduced quality of life (QoL), even in remission. Clinical hypnosis, involving focused relaxation and therapeutic suggestion, is helpful for irritable bowel syndrome, pain, and anxiety, and may have anti-inflammatory effects. Study Aims: To implement hypnosis as an adjunctive therapy for adolescents with CD. To assess the impact on QoL, abdominal pain, psychosocial measures, and disease activity compared to standard care.
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Quality of Life/Psychosocial Care Source Type: research
Both depression and anxiety are comorbidities of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Though previous studies have proposed a relationship between depression, anxiety and IBD, causality and directionality are unknown. We used a novel computerized adaptive testing technology to screen IBD patients for depression and anxiety and  compared the screening results to disease activity.
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Quality of Life/Psychosocial Care Source Type: research
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) are characterized by recurrent abdominal pain, altered bowel habits, and psychological distress. Gastrointestinal (GI) symptom-specific anxiety (GSA) is the cognitive, affective, and behavioral response stemming from anxiety and fear of GI symptoms. The Visceral Sensitivity Index (VSI) measures GSA and is validated in IBS but may also be a useful measure in IBD. We previously showed that VSI scores (increased GSA) are significantly higher in adult IBD patients with mild disease activity vs.
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Quality of Life/Psychosocial Care Source Type: research
This study evaluated the rate at which gastroenterology providers discussed or documented depression and /or anxiety in IBD patients.
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Practice Management/Quality of Care/Quality Assurance Source Type: research
ConclusionsPractitioners should consider use of less restrictive or intrusive interventions to promote food acceptance and the use of larger sets of foods, modified to include fewer foods in the case of poor response to intervention.
Source: Research in Developmental Disabilities - Category: Disability Source Type: research
Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) results in a decrease of dystrophin with potential implications for cognitive and psychiatric complications. To better understand these concerns, we conducted a retrospective study of the neuropsychological symptoms and respective pharmacotherapies of 74 BMD patients. Eight (10.8%) patients exhibited autistic features, 26 (35.1%) exhibited inattention/hyperactivity, 23 (31.1%) had learning difficulties, 27 (36.5%) had language delays, 9 (12.2%) had global intellectual delays, 4 (5.4%) had features of tics or Tourette's, 27 (36.5%) had emotion dysregulation, 14 (18.9%) had obsessive-compulsiv...
Source: Neuromuscular Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
This review summarizes motor stereotypies in terms of description, prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. They are fixed and persistent movements. Stereotypies begin before 3 years of age and continue into adulthood. Primary motor stereotypies occur in children of normal intelligence, whereas secondary stereotypies ensue in the setting of an additional diagnosis such as autism spectrum disorder or other neurologic disorders. They are highly associated with comorbidities such as anxiety, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, inattention, and tics.
Source: Seminars in Pediatric Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
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