Mapranosis: the Influence of Commensal Microbes on Neurodegenerative Disease

Commensal microbes are the largely helpful populations that live inside us, usually meaning the gut microbiota, but there are others, such as the bacteria found in the mouth. Among these largely helpful microbes are a range of species that cause us harm over the years, however - consider the bacterial origins of gum disease, for example. Researchers are increasingly interested in the ways in which the swarming microbial life inside us, and particularly in the gut, might influence the progression of aging; to what degree are gut bacteria a cause of the observed natural variations in pace and outcome of aging in mammals? This is an open question. In the case of neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, microbial life may contribute by generating some fraction of the amyloid deposits or chronic inflammation known to be associated with the condition. In this context, some scientists are focused on invading microbes such as spirochetes, while others, like those noted here, are more interested in the commensal microbes that normally live inside us. There is a fair amount of evidence for either of these two classes of microbe to be involved. Research in the past two decades has revealed that microbial organisms in the gut influence health and disease in many ways, particularly related to immune function, metabolism, and resistance to infection. Recent studies have shown that gut microbes also may cause or worsen Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's diseas...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

Thread Starter lab tests in relation to Parkinsons disease Follow 9 minutes ago 9m ago Quote: Originally Posted by curious5755 I may sound very ignorant but Is there any simple lab experiments that can be done in sixth form that looks at how functions of either - ...
Source: The Student Room - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Medicine Source Type: forums
MRC-funded scientists have discovered a vicious feedback loop underlying brain degeneration in Alzheimer’s disease, which may explain why so many drug trials have failed.
Source: Medical Research Council General News - Category: Research Source Type: news
Irah L. King, Yue Li
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Authors: Mo Y, Xu E, Wei R, Le B, Song L, Li D, Chen Y, Ji X, Fang S, Shen J, Yang C, Wang Q Abstract Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in PD remain unclear, neuroinflammation is considered as the vital mediator in the pathogenesis and progression of PD. Bushen-Yizhi Formula (BSYZ), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been demonstrated to exert antineuroinflammation in our previous studies. However, it rema...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Researchers from King's College London claim that drug developers should target a little-known protein that causes the characteristic protein clumps to develop in a Alzheimer's patient's brain.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
AbstractIn Alzheimer ’s disease (AD) and other tauopathies, the cytosolic protein Tau misfolds and forms intracellular aggregates which accumulate within the brain leading to neurodegeneration. Clinical progression is tightly linked to the progressive spread of Tau pathology throughout the brain, and several lines of evidence suggest that Tau aggregates or “seeds” may propagate pathology by spreading from cell to cell in a “prion like” manner. Accordingly, blocking the spread of extracellular seeds with an antibody could be a viable therapeutic approach. However, as the structure of Tau seeds ...
Source: Acta Neuropathologica - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
The objective of this study is to provide initial proof-of-concept that the plasma lipoproteome more likely differ between AD cases and controls when measured in individual plasma lipoprotein fractions than when measured as total in immunodepleted plasma.MethodsWe first developed a targeted proteomics method based on selected reaction monitoring (SRM) and liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry for measurement of 120 tryptic peptides from 79 proteins that are commonly present in plasma lipoproteins. Then in a proof-of concept case –control study of 5 AD cases and 5 sex- and age-matched controls, we applied...
Source: Clinical Proteomics - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
AbstractApathy is commonly reported in Alzheimer ’s Disease (AD), Fronto-Temporal Dementia (FTD) and Parkinson’s Disease (PD). In our meta-analysis we analysed a total of 41 studies to identify brain patterns associated with apathy. For these purposes we used activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses. Our main overall analysis showed that apathy is associated to hypometabolism and a decreased gray matter volume in the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 45, 46). Disorder-specific analyses, not performed by means of meta-analysis, because of the small number of studies, but by means a label-based review, reveal...
Source: Brain Imaging and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
This study shows for the first time that increasing arterial stiffness is detrimental to the brain, and that increasing stiffness and brain injury begin in early middle life, before we commonly think of prevalent diseases such as atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease or stroke having an impact." The study also noted that elevated arterial stiffness is the earliest manifestation of systolic hypertension. The large study involved approximately 1,900 diverse participants in the Framingham Heart Study, who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as arterial tonometry. The tests measured the force o...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This article covers the lengthy process of turning a serendipitous discovery, that a particular phage can dissolve the amyloids and other aggregates involved in neurodegenerative conditions, into a drug candidate. It demonstrates well why medical development takes a long time, more than a decade so far in this case even prior to entering the regulatory process. Each step in the process can take years to work through, funding is ever a problem, and there are frequent delays and dead ends. In 2004, researchers were running an experiment on a group of mice that had been genetically engineered to develop Alzheimer's disease p...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
More News: ALS | Alzheimer's | Brain | Neurology | Parasitic Diseases | Parasitology | Parkinson's Disease | Research | Study