Impact of microbiota on the use and effects of isoflavones in the relief of climacteric symptoms in menopausal women – A review

Publication date: February 2018 Source:Journal of Functional Foods, Volume 41 Author(s): Naice E.S. Monteiro, Lívia D. Queirós, Danielle B. Lopes, Adriana O. Pedro, Gabriela A. Macedo Menopause is a natural event that occurs in women around the age of 50 years, causing irregularities in the menstrual cycle until its complete end, due to the hormonal deficit, especially estrogen, that causes several unpleasant urogenital and vasomotor symptoms. Hormone replacement therapy has many benefits, but should be prescribed with caution in women with a history of stroke, thromboembolic events, certain types of cancer, or increased risk (genetic predisposition) for these events, so many women seek alternatives to hormonal therapy. Phytoestrogens, especially isoflavones, have many benefits in the climacteric phase, due to the similarity of their chemical structure with the hormone estradiol (E2), reducing the rate of menopause side effects and resulting in symptom relief. Furthermore, the isoflavones may still have their effects potentiated by an intestinal microbiota modulated with probiotic strains, which act on metabolism and increase the bioavailability of these phytoestrogens, and can benefit menopausal women's health.
Source: Journal of Functional Foods - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research

Related Links:

We presently forget 98% of everything we experience. That will go away in favor of perfect, controllable, configurable memory. Skills and knowledge will become commodities that can be purchased and installed. We will be able to feel exactly as we wish to feel at any given time. How we perceive the world will be mutable and subject to choice. How we think, the very fundamental basis of the mind, will also be mutable and subject to choice. We will merge with our machines, as Kurzweil puts it. The boundary between mind and computing device, between the individual and his or her tools, will blur. Over the course of the ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Several myths surrounding heart diseases state that heart diseases attract only elder people and more men than women are prone to heart attacks. Contrary to the belief, cardiovascular cases are on rise in women than men and it is deadlier than all forms of cancers combined. Both physiological and psychological factors are causing heart diseases and it affects people of all ages with no bias. Women that have suffered from mental illness are more susceptible to attract heart risks like stroke. Mental ill health like schizophrenia, anxiety disorders and bipolar disorders are mostly treated with antidepressants, antipsychotics...
Source: Sciences Blog - Category: Science Authors: Tags: OMICS Anxiety Disorders bipolar disorders cardiovascular cases heart attacks heart diseases psychological factors Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that TIGIT is a prominent negative immune regulator involved in immunosenescence. This novel finding is highly significant, as targeting TIGIT might be an effective strategy to improve the immune response and decrease age-related comorbidities. Delivery of Extracellular Vesicles as a Potential Basis for Therapies https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/01/delivery-of-extracellular-vesicles-as-a-potential-basis-for-therapies/ Here I'll point out a readable open access review paper on the potential use of extracellular vesicles as a basis for therapy: harveste...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
With more than a hundred exhibitors, countless new ideas and exciting innovations digital health truly conquered Las Vegas and CES 2018. Just as last year, we decided to show you the most and least impressive healthcare-related gadgets, sensors, trackers, and more importantly, the discernible trends. 2018 – The year when digital health arrived at CES Would you like to play ping-pong with a robot? Do you want to try an air taxi? If you responded to both questions with “hell yes!” (how else, really), then your place is in the venues hosting CES. Innovators and tech fanatics flock to Las Vegas every January ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine AI ces CES 2018 digital digital health Health 2.0 Healthcare Innovation Personalized medicine robotics technology trackers wearables Source Type: blogs
View Original Article Here: Tai Chi For Seniors: Exercises, Benefits, and Tips For The Elderly Tai chi, a form of Chinese martial arts that focuses on slow, controlled movements. It’s low impact and gives people with limited mobility a chance to improve their balance, range of motion and coordination. Research shows that tai chi for seniors can reduce the incidence of falls in elderly and at-risk adults by about 43 percent. With fewer than 34 percent of aging adults getting enough exercise, it’s important for caregivers, older individuals and people who work with seniors to know about this gentle but effective ...
Source: Shield My Senior - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Senior Safety Source Type: blogs
Conclusions:The risks of cardiovascular disease and cancer were not elevated among postmenopausal women using vaginal estrogens, providing reassurance about the safety of treatment. Objective: To determine the association between use of vaginal estrogen and risk of a global index event (GIE), defined as time to first occurrence of coronary heart disease (CHD), invasive breast cancer, stroke, pulmonary embolism, hip fracture, colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, or death from any cause. Methods: For this prospective observational cohort study, we used data from participants of the Women's Health Initiative Observat...
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Conclusions: Long-term exposure to NO2 and road traffic noise was associated with higher risk of heart failure, mainly among men, in both single- and two-pollutant models. High exposure to both pollutants was associated with highest risk. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1272 Received: 25 October 2016 Revised: 09 August 2017 Accepted: 09 August 2017 Published: 26 September 2017 Address correspondence to M. Sørensen. Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. Telephone: +45 35257626. Email: mettes@cancer.dk Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: The summary index of risks versus benefits was similar for oral CEE versus oral or transdermal E2-containing regimens. CEE + P containing less than 0.625 mg/d of CEE (vs 0.625 mg/d) for less than 5 years appeared safer.
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
It’s not going to kill you to take hormone replacement therapy. That’s the take home message from the latest analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative, the largest and longest randomized trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in menopausal women. After almost 18 years of follow up in the WHI, there was no increase in overall mortality, including death rates from cancer, in women taking HRT for up to 5.6 years (estrogen plus progestin) or 7.2 years (estrogen alone). There was a non-significant reduction in mortality among those who started HRT between ages 50 and 59, the group most likely to ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Hormone Replacement Menopause WHI breast cancer estrogen HRT Prempro Source Type: blogs
This study, the first to examine potential adverse health effects in users of vaginal estrogen compared with non-users, suggests that vaginal estrogen therapy is a safe treatment for genitourinary symptoms such as burning, discomfort, and pain during intercourse associated with menopause.AUTHORSThe paper ’s authors are Dr. Carolyn Crandall of UCLA; Kathleen Hovey of the State University of New York at Buffalo; Christopher Andrews of the University of Michigan; Dr. Rowan Chlebowski of City of Hope; Marcia Stefanick of Stanford University; Dr. Dorothy Lane of the State University of New York at Ston y Brook; Dr. Jan Sh...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
More News: Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Chemistry | Estradiol | Genetics | Hormonal Therapy | Hormone Replacement Therapy | Hormones | Men | Menopause | Probiotics | Stroke | Women