How a Venezuelan Living with HIV Could Change the Way Mexico Deals with Refugees

Daniel (not his real name), is a Venezuelan living with HIV. Mexico gave him refugee status, based on a humanitarian cause. Credit: Sergio Ortiz/ Amnistía InternacionalBy Josefina SalomonMEXICO CITY, Dec 21 2017 (IPS)As Daniel*, a 26-year-old architect, stood before a visibly exhausted doctor in the main public hospital of the once-idyllic beach resort town of Isla Margarita, northern Venezuela, a terrifying premonition took hold of him.“We are not doing tests until further notice. The machine is not working and we don’t have any reagents,” the man in the white coat told him.It was early June 2015. Venezuela was on the verge of a humanitarian crisis that was forcing people to queue for basic food and medical supplies. A couple of days before, Daniel had been diagnosed with HIV during a routine health check.The tests being discussed were essential to establish the type of treatment he needed. But the main hospital in one of the richest states in Venezuela did not have the necessary supplies to carry them out.Josefina Salomon. Credit: Amnistía InternacionalIn much of the world, advances in treatment has meant HIV is now a chronic, manageable condition similar to diabetes, but in Venezuela it can now mean serious illness and risk of death.Daniel’s premonition was brutally simple: no test. No treatment. No future. The lack of everything“Eventually doctors told me I was going to have to wait at least three months to have the tests d...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Headlines Health Human Rights Latin America & the Caribbean LGBTQ Migration & Refugees Regional Categories Source Type: news

Related Links:

Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Americans are drowning in financial troubles. Credit card debt hit a record high this year at more than $1 trillion, according to the Federal Reserve. Student loan debt has jumped 150 percent over the span of just a decade. And not only are we drowning in debt, we’re also not saving, which further compounds the problem. About 1 in 4 Americans don’t even have a single dollar saved for an emergency. All of this takes a big toll on us, emotionally and physically. A survey by the American Institute of CPAs found that more than half of Americans with debt say that it’s negatively impacted their lives. What&rs...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Money and Financial New Year's Careless spending debt financial planning Source Type: blogs
Sadly, stigma around health conditions remains a part of many patients ’ lives. Many will not disclose a diagnosis for fear of being judged by peers, employers, health professionals, colleagues and wider society. In fact, there is clear evidence that such negative societal attitudes impact health outcomes, resulting in diagnosis delays and impaired treatment.Some diseases are heavily stigmatized – including mental health, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis and some skin conditions – leading people to restrict their participation in society, impairing their chances of living happy, healthy lives.However, to one extent or...
Source: EyeForPharma - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
Online CBT study shows improvements largely result of better sleep patterns Related items fromOnMedica Researchers say a sense of purpose aids sleep Anxiety/insomnia pills not linked to dementia Mobile devices linked to poor teen sleep Poor sleep habits amplify knee pain Daytime naps associated with diabetes risk
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
By Susan Blumenthal, M.D. and Alexandrea Adams The recent commemoration of National Women’s Health Week provided an important time to mark the progress that has been made in advancing women’s health over the past two decades and to highlight what more needs to be done to achieve women’s health equity in America. Historically, women have experienced discrimination in health care despite making 80 percent of health care decisions for their families, using more medical services than men, and suffering greater disability from chronic disease. Before the mid 1990’s, women were often excluded as subjects ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Compared to usual care across a wide variety of decision contexts, people exposed to decision aids feel more knowledgeable, better informed, and clearer about their values, and they probably have a more active role in decision making and more accurate risk perceptions. There is growing evidence that decision aids may improve values-congruent choices. There are no adverse effects on health outcomes or satisfaction. New for this updated is evidence indicating improved knowledge and accurate risk perceptions when decision aids are used either within or in preparation for the consultation. Further research is need...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Conclusions Feline-assisted therapy can be used in a variety of settings, and it is gaining increased popularity. Cat-assisted therapy is particularly recommended for patients who are unable to interact with large animals such as horses or are afraid of dogs.
Source: Polish Annals of Medicine - Category: Journals (General) Source Type: research
The proportion of persons 60 years and older is projected to almost double during 2000–2030 in South Africa. Credit: Jeffrey Moyo / IPSBy Manoj K. Pandey, Vani S. Kulkarni and Raghav GaihaCanberra, Philadelphia and Manchester, Feb 20 2017 (IPS)Old age is often characterised by poor health due to isolation, morbidities and disabilities in carrying out activities of daily living (DADLs) leading to depression. Mental disorders—in different forms and intensities— affect most of the population in their lifetime. In most cases, people experiencing mild episodes of depression or anxiety deal with them without di...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: Global & Universal Authors: Tags: Africa Aid Featured Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights Women's Health Source Type: news
The United States is struggling to deal with an opioid epidemic that is damaging lives, resulting in overdoses, and yet not reducing chronic pain. National initiatives are underway to dramatically reduce access to prescription opioids, but these efforts lack a systematic approach to provide alternative treatments for these patients. Policy changes are urgently needed to provide better care for patients with chronic pain, and in this post, we outline three feasible policy initiatives. Innovative reimbursement initiatives by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) could frame and stimulate use of evidence-based ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Drugs and Medical Technology Health Professionals Public Health Quality chronic pain Opioid Addiction opioids Source Type: blogs
Only 2.7 percent of U.S. adults hit the four key metrics of living a healthy lifestyle -- abstaining from smoking, eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy body fat percentage -- according to a disheartening new study. The study's lifestyle benchmarks for health weren't particularly high. Being smoke-free, exercising moderately and eating USDA recommended foods don't seem like particularly difficult marks to hit. So why do so many Americans fall short of living healthy lives?  "That is the million dollar question," Ellen Smit, a senior author of the study and an associate professor at the Orego...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
More News: Anxiety | Brazil Health | Colombia Health | Costa Rica Health | Diabetes | Economy | Endocrinology | Government | HIV AIDS | Honduras Health | Hospitals | International Medicine & Public Health | Legislation | Medical Law | Mexico Health | Panama Health | Peru Health | Salaries | Spain Health | Statistics | United Nations | Venezuela Health