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Inflammatory biomarkers of low back pain and disc degeneration: a review

Abstract Biomarkers are biological characteristics that can be used to indicate health or disease. This paper reviews studies on biomarkers of low back pain (LBP) in human subjects. LBP is the leading cause of disability, caused by various spine‐related disorders, including intervertebral disc degeneration, disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and facet arthritis. The focus of these studies is inflammatory mediators, because inflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of disc degeneration and associated pain mechanisms. Increasingly, studies suggest that the presence of inflammatory mediators can be measured systemically in the blood. These biomarkers may serve as novel tools for directing patient care. Currently, patient response to treatment is unpredictable with a significant rate of recurrence, and, while surgical treatments may provide anatomical correction and pain relief, they are invasive and costly. The review covers studies performed on populations with specific diagnoses and undefined origins of LBP. Since the natural history of LBP is progressive, the temporal nature of studies is categorized by duration of symptomology/disease. Related studies on changes in biomarkers with treatment are also reviewed. Ultimately, diagnostic biomarkers of LBP and spinal degeneration have the potential to shepherd an era of individualized spine medicine for personalized therapeutics in the treatment of LBP.
Source: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: REVIEW Source Type: research

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More and more people are suffering from lowback pain worldwide - an issue that is being made worse by the widespread prevalence of inappropriate treatment methods. This is the conclusion of a series of new scientific papers published by The Lancet, which have reviewed evidence from high and low-income countries, finding that this is a global problem that can only be solved through better adherence to best practice treatment guidelines. A global problem exacerbated by ineffective care The first of these new reviews revealed that low backpain is now the leading cause of disability on a global basis, with the issue becoming m...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Habits Health-related LifeHelper Self-Help Source Type: blogs
Authors: Terenzi R, Monti S, Tesei G, Carli L Abstract The term spondyloarthritis (SpA) represents a condition characterised by a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, laboratory abnormalities and imaging features; in particular, SpA is an inflammatory condition in which both peripheral and axial joints might be affected. The majority of people with this disease have either psoriatic arthritis or axial spondyloarthritis, which includes ankylosing spondylitis. Less common subgroups are enteropathic SpA, which is associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis), reactive arth...
Source: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: Clin Exp Rheumatol Source Type: research
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Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping Skills Coping strategies Professional topics Research Resilience/Health Science in practice acceptance function healthcare self management Therapeutic approaches Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsOur investigation identified several species of pharmacological interest as good sources for harpagoside and other important anti-inflammatory metabolites.
Source: Metabolomics - Category: Biology Source Type: research
Abstract Low back pain (LBP) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has so far been of little concern in clinical investigations. The main focus of scientific publications on spinal problems in RA was the cervical spine. In a recent study, we could demonstrate that LBP in RA patients leads to a significantly higher degree of disability and depression as well as to a reduction in quality of life compared to RA patients without LBP. If there is a specific reason for the additional symptom of LBP, such as spinal stenosis or segmental instability, surgical treatment may be indicated to improve ...
Source: Zeitschrift fur Rheumatologie - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Z Rheumatol Source Type: research
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Source: JCR: Journal of Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
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Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Assessment Pain Pain conditions Research biopsychosocial Clinical reasoning disability function healthcare rehabilitation science treatment Source Type: blogs
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Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Assessment Pain Pain conditions Research Science in practice biopsychosocial Chronic pain disability pain management rehabilitation treatment Source Type: blogs
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Source: Psychology of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs
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