Avoiding holiday excess (and what to do if you overdo it)

The holidays are famously a time of celebration, and where there is celebrating, there is usually too much alcohol, too many rich foods, and not enough sleep. Here are some basic tips on not overdoing it — and how to manage when you have. Common sense rules You know the saying “Don’t go to the grocery store hungry”? The reason is pretty obvious. If you’re famished, you may not make the best food choices. Well, the same applies to holiday parties. If you are truly hungry, have something healthy and filling beforehand, like a beautiful salad. Pressed for time? Eat an apple. Already there? Look at the appetizers. Is there anything reasonably healthy? Pick up a small plate and choose from the healthier options, like crudités (vegetable slices), shrimp cocktail, even fruit and cheese (no crackers). Avoid fried snacks and processed carbohydrates. Enjoy! Take the edge off your hunger, then walk away from the table. Are you the host? Serve delicious hors d’oeuvres that also happen to be healthy. Some ideas: make or purchase fresh guacamole, sprinkle with red pepper flakes, and serve as a dip with crisp sweet red pepper slices. Or try red pepper hummus sprinkled with crushed toasted pistachios, served with bright green cucumber rounds. Easy, and easy on the eyes as well! Stay hydrated Drink water, and a lot of it, to feel full as well as minimize alcohol intake and its effects. Are you the host? Serve a fancy festive mocktail: sparkling water...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Behavioral Health Healthy Eating Prevention Source Type: blogs

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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Headache Health Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Antidepressant Antipsychotic General Medications Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Psychology Research Sexuality Stimulants Treatment Source Type: blogs
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Headache Health Source Type: blogs
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Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
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Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Substance Abuse clean relapse sober sober living sobriety treatment center Source Type: blogs
Do you have the feeling that genomics is all around this year and you cannot escape DNAs, SNPs, chromosomes and double spirals wherever you look? Do you suspect that even Billy Mack is considering a change to “Genes are all around you” in everyone’s favorite holiday movie, Love Actually? Well, that won’t be a surprise as Christmas and genetics have more in common than you think – and scientists are even working on figuring out Santa’s genetic make-up. Gene-edited Christmas trees and Santa’s DNA If it’s all in our genes, the explanation for the Grinch hating the holidays or Sa...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Genomics Patients christmas Christmas tree december dinner DNA dna testing food future Gene genes genetics holiday holidays Innovation nutrigenomics pharmacogenomics Santa technology Source Type: blogs
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