Metformin May Up Survival in Older Men With Moderate CKD Metformin May Up Survival in Older Men With Moderate CKD

Veterans with type 2 diabetes and moderate chronic kidney disease fared well on metformin in an observational study; more research is needed to see whether this is also the case in other patient populations.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017Source: Clinica Chimica ActaAuthor(s): Sahapab Anuwatmatee, Shudi Tang, Ben J. Wu, Kerry-Anne Rye, Kwok Leung OngAbstractThe association between fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and kidney function has been extensively studied in recent years in both animal and human studies. However, the exact functional role of FGF21 in the kidney remains unclear. Previous animal studies have shown that administration of FGF21 ameliorates kidney function, morphological glomerular abnormalities, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, oxidative stress and obesity. In human stud...
Source: Clinica Chimica Acta - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusions: CD146 is associated with kidney injury and could be a good marker to predict renal outcomes in patients with early stages of DN.Cell Physiol Biochem 2018;48:63 –74
Source: Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): Vikram Patney, Kunal Chaudhary, Adam Whaley-ConnellThe global incidence and prevalence of diabetes continues to expand due primarily to the influences of obesity and the contribution of obesity to the progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes has driven an increase in rates of CKD in the past 3 decades in the United States. In turn, so have the rates for complications related to type 2 diabetes including CKD, eg, diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Although incident rates for DKD have stab...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): Richard J. MacIsaac, George Jerums, Elif I. EkinciImproving strategies to prevent the development and progression of CKD is a highly desirable outcome for all involved in the care of patients with diabetes. This is because CKD is a major factor contributing to morbidly and mortality in patients with diabetes. Furthermore, diabetes is the leading cause of ESRD in most developed countries. Although tight glucose control is now an established modality for preventing the development and progression of albuminuria, evidence is n...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
We present an example taken from the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes, a randomized trial of people with type 2 diabetes at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants were stratified according to baseline markers of kidney disease: (1) no kidney disease; (2) low estimated glomerular filtration rate; (3) microalbuminuria alone; and (4) macroalbuminuria. The macroalbuminuria group had the highest risk for ESRD and demonstrated the most marked difference between the Kaplan-Meier and cumulative incidence estimator. Cox and Fine-Gray regression models yielded similar risk estimates for baseline characte...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): Digsu N. Koye, Dianna J. Magliano, Robert G. Nelson, Meda E. PavkovThe prevalence of diabetes is increasing worldwide, with the greatest increases occurring in low- and middle-income countries. In most developed countries, type 2 diabetes is presently the leading cause of end-stage renal disease and also contributes substantially to cardiovascular disease. In countries with weaker economies type 2 diabetes is rapidly replacing communicable diseases as a leading cause of kidney disease and is increasingly competing for scarc...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Diabetes &Endocrinology, Volume 6, Issue 7Author(s): Srinivasan Beddhu, Tom Greene, Robert Boucher, William C Cushman, Guo Wei, Gregory Stoddard, Joachim H Ix, Michel Chonchol, Holly Kramer, Alfred K Cheung, Paul L Kimmel, Paul K Whelton, Glenn M ChertowSummaryBackgroundGuidelines, including the 2017 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association blood pressure guideline, recommend tighter control of systolic blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes. However, it is unclear whether intensive lowering of systolic blood pressure increases the incidence of c...
Source: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01621178.FindingsBetween Aug 15, 2012, and Nov 30, 2015, 577 patients were randomly assigned, 193 to dulaglutide 1·5 mg, 190 to dulaglutide 0·75 mg, and 194 to insulin glargine. The effects on HbA1c change at 26 weeks of dulaglutide 1·5 mg and 0·75 mg were non-inferior to those of insulin glargine (least squares mean [LSM] −1·2% [SE 0·1] with dulaglutide 1·5 mg [183 patients]; −1·1% [0·1] with dulaglutide 0·75 mg [180 patients]; −1·1% [0·1] with insulin glargine [...
Source: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
ConclusionMean GA levels were more closely associated with DN progression than mean HbA1c in subjects with T2DM and can be implemented as an alternative diagnostic marker in nephropathy.
Source: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 June 2018Source: Canadian Journal of DiabetesAuthor(s): Adame Perez SI, Senior PA, Field CJ, Jindal K, Mager DRAbstractBackgroundFrailty can cause an increased vulnerability to adverse health outcomes such as falls, fractures, depression and reduced health related quality of life (HRQoL). This cross sectional study compared differences in body composition, HRQoL, mental health, cognitive and vitamin D (VitD) status and health care utilization between frail and non-frail adults with Diabetes Mellitus (DM Type 1 and Type 2) with chronic kidney disease (CKD stages 1-5).Methods and Partici...
Source: Canadian Journal of Diabetes - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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