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Childhood cancer survivors have more blood pressure problems

(Reuters Health) - More than one in 12 adult survivors of childhood cancers may have undiagnosed high blood pressure, a U.S. study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

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In this study, we used the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) to estimate clinically measured SBP and DBP trajectories for 20 years prior to death, for individuals dying at 60 years and older. Second, we compared the linear SBP trends for years 10 to 3 years before death in patients who died and age- and sex-matched controls who survived at least 9 years. These approaches aimed to separate age from end-of-life associations, and avoid healthy survivor biases. Twenty years before death, estimated mean SBPs increased with increasing age at death (60-69 years, 139.5 mm Hg; ≥90 years, 150.0 mm Hg). All age-at-...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
(American Association for Cancer Research) People who survived childhood cancer were more than twice as likely as the general population to have high blood pressure (hypertension) as adults.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
Conclusion: Our results link transportation noise exposure to development of obesity and suggest that combined exposure from different sources may be particularly harmful. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1910 Received: 17 March 2017 Revised: 5 October 2017 Accepted: 9 October 2017 Published: 20 November 2017 Address correspondence to A. Pyko, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Telephone: 46(0) 852487561. Email: Andrei.pyko@ki.se Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1910). The authors declare they have no actual or potential competing fina...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
The Growing Toll of Our Ever-Expanding WaistlinesBy  JANE E. BRODY NOV. 13, 2017Paul Rogers I hope you ’re not chomping on a bagel or, worse, a doughnut while you read about what is probably the most serious public health irony of the last half century in this country: As one major killer — smoking — declined, another rose precipitously to take its place: obesity.Many cancer deaths were averted after millions quit lighting up, but they are now rising because even greater numbers are unable to keep their waistlines in check.Today, obesity and smoking remain the two leading causes of pre...
Source: Dr Portnay - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Celestina of Porcón Alto, a rural region high in the Andes, whose family has lived on the same plot of land for generations. Credit: Andrea Vale/IPSBy Andrea ValePORCÓN, Peru, Oct 6 2017 (IPS)Good healthcare can be hard to get – particularly when one lives on top of a mountain. The road to Porcón in the Cajamarca region of Peru, therefore, is as breathtaking as it is sobering. With every step further into its isolated natural beauty, a group of volunteers sent to deliver healthcare essentials are reminded how long the trek would be in an emergency.After a bus has taken the volunteers as far as it...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Featured Headlines Health Inequity Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs Women's Health Andes diabetes Malnutrition obesity Peru underweight Source Type: news
In this study, researchers put some numbers to the correlation, and improve on previous attempts to rule out wealth and other effects as significant contributing causes. A study finds that a Chinese policy is unintentionally causing people in northern China to live 3.1 years less than people in the south, due to air pollution concentrations that are 46 percent higher. These findings imply that every additional 10 micrograms per cubic meter of particulate matter pollution reduces life expectancy by 0.6 years. The elevated mortality is entirely due to an increase in cardiorespiratory deaths, indicating that air poll...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract Pulmonary hypertension, determined noninvasively by tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity on Doppler echocardiography, was previously identified in 25% of long‐term survivors who received chest‐directed radiotherapy. To validate noninvasively defined pulmonary hypertension, survivors (mean age 48 years), exposed to chest radiotherapy, underwent right heart catheterization with planned cardiopulmonary exercise testing during catheterization. Eight participants had an elevated mean pulmonary artery pressure at rest (≥25 mm Hg) or with subsequent exercise (>30 mm Hg), evidence of hemodynamically conf...
Source: Pediatric Blood and Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: BRIEF REPORT Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur study shows that the region is facing several health challenges and calls for global efforts to stabilise the region and to address the current and future burden of disease.
Source: International Journal of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Conclusions: We found evidence of racial/ethnic and socioeconomic differences in model-based estimates of noise exposure throughout the United States. Additional research is needed to determine if differences in noise exposure may contribute to health disparities in the United States. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP898 Received: 01 August 2016 Revised: 06 February 2017 Accepted: 06 February 2017 Published: 25 July 2017 Address correspondence to J.A. Casey, University of California, Berkeley, 13B University Hall, Berkeley, CA 94610 USA. Telephone: 541-760-8477; Email: joanacasey@berkeley.edu Supplemental Material is avail...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
This article covers some of the advances of recent years in understanding the effects of varied forms of calorie restriction in humans. Efforts to quantify the results and find a good 80/20 point, at which most of the effects of longer and more stringent reductions in calorie intake are still evident, have resulted in practical outcomes. A number of quite interesting discoveries have been made along the way, such as the ability of longer fasting periods to clear out and replace damaged immune cells to some degree. The second phase of the Comprehensive Assessment of Long-term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy (C...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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