Synthetic molecule makes cancer self-destruct

(University of Texas at Austin) Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions have created a molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by ferrying sodium and chloride ions into the cancer cells. These synthetic ion transporters, described this week in the journal Nature Chemistry, confirm a two-decades-old hypothesis that could point the way to new anticancer drugs while also benefitting patients with cystic fibrosis.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

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This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 31721358 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cell Biology International - Category: Cytology Authors: Tags: Cell Biol Int Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 8 November 2019Source: Respiratory InvestigationAuthor(s): Lucia Vietri, Annalisa Fui, Laura Bergantini, Miriana d’Alessandro, Paolo Cameli, Piersante Sestini, Paola Rottoli, Elena BargagliAbstractSerum amyloid A is an acute-phase protein with multiple immunological functions. Serum amyloid A is involved in lipid metabolism, inflammatory reactions, granuloma formation, and cancerogenesis. Additionally, serum amyloid A is involved in the pathogenesis of different autoimmune lung diseases. The levels of serum amyloid A has been evaluated in biological fluids of patients with different...
Source: Respiratory Investigation - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
AbstractIbuprofen first came to market about 50  years ago and rapidly moved to over-the-counter (OTC) sales. In April 2019, the National Agency for the Safety of Medicines and Health Products (ANSM) of France issued a warning for NSAID uses by patients with infectious diseases based on an analysis of 20 years of real-world safety data on ibupr ofen and ketoprofen. Nevertheless, ibuprofen remains a mainstay in the analgesic armamentarium and with numerous randomized clinical trials, head-to-head studies, and decades of clinical experience. The authors offer a review of the safety of ibuprofen and how it may diffe...
Source: Advances in Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Semin Respir Crit Care Med DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1697591Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multiorgan disease, and gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations can contribute to significant morbidity and mortality for individuals with CF. Up to 85% of patients with CF experience GI symptoms, thus addressing the GI aspects of this disease is paramount. With the advent of highly effective CF transmembrane conductance regulator modulators that are increasingly available, many individuals with CF now have significantly improved life expectancy. With these advances, GI manifestations that can be a detriment to quality of life such as gastroesopha...
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
Abstract Purinergic signaling was proposed in 1972, after it was demonstrated that adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) was a transmitter in nonadrenergic, noncholinergic inhibitory nerves supplying the guinea-pig taenia coli. Later, ATP was identified as an excitatory cotransmitter in sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves, and it is now apparent that ATP acts as a cotransmitter in most, if not all, nerves in both the peripheral nervous system and central nervous system (CNS). ATP acts as a short-term signaling molecule in neurotransmission, neuromodulation, and neurosecretion. It also has potent, long-term (trophic) ...
Source: Mol Biol Cell - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Methods Mol Biol Source Type: research
As of October, 2019 Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series contain details of 69,204 epidemiological surveys – of which 1,107 (1.6%) are related to the prevalence of specific viral species in patients with respiratory tract infection.  [1-3] The following chronology of published studies summarizes the relative proportion of viral agents associated with non-influenza childhood respiratory infection in the United States.  Additional details and primary references are available on request. 1976 – 2001 Tennessee hMPV accounted for 20% of acute respiratory illness among children ages 0 to...
Source: GIDEON blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology ProMED Source Type: blogs
Abstract In their seminal papers Hanahan and Weinberg described oncogenic processes a normal cell undergoes to be transformed into a cancer cell. The functions of ion channels in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract influence a variety of cellular processes, many of which overlap with these hallmarks of cancer. In this review we focus on the roles of the calcium (Ca2+), sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), chloride (Cl-) and zinc (Zn2+) transporters in GI cancer, with a special emphasis on the roles of the KCNQ1 K+ channel and CFTR Cl- channel in colorectal cancer (CRC). Ca2+ is a ubiquitous second messenger, serving as a sig...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 31585024 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Physiology - Category: Physiology Authors: Tags: J Physiol Source Type: research
Authors: Liu X Abstract The transport of specific molecules across lipid membranes is an essential function of all living organisms. The processes are usually mediated by specific transporters. One of the largest transporter families is the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family. More than 40 ABC transporters have been identified in human, which are divided into 7 subfamilies (ABCA to ABCG) based on their gene structure, amino acid sequence, domain organization, and phylogenetic analysis. Of them, at least 11 ABC transporters including P-glycoprotein (P-GP/ABCB1), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs/ABCCs), a...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Abstract E74-like factor 5 (ELF5) and ETS-homologous factor (EHF) are epithelial selective ETS family transcription factors (TFs) encoded by genes at chr11p13, a region associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease severity. EHF controls many key processes in lung epithelial function so its regulatory mechanisms are important. Using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we removed three key cis-regulatory elements (CREs) from the chr11p13 region and also activated multiple open chromatin sites with CRISPRa in airway epithelial cells. Deletion of the CREs caused subtle changes in chromatin architecture and site-specific incr...
Source: J Cell Mol Med - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: J Cell Mol Med Source Type: research
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