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Surge in gun sales after Sandy Hook led to spike in accidental gun deaths, study says

In the days after the horrific shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, gun enthusiasts rushed to buy millions of firearms, driven by fears that the massacre would spark new gun legislation. Those restrictions never became a reality, but a new study concludes that all the additional guns caused a significant jump in accidental firearm deaths. […]Related:A mother got the flu from her children — and was dead two days laterGene therapy makes a big advance treating hemophilia B blood disorderThe moral differences between pro- and anti-vaccine parents
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blogJust when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 217: children who changed medicine. Question 1In 1796, What did James Phipps (1788-1853) participate in that significantly changed the course of modern medicine?+ Reveal the Funtabulous Answerexpand(document.getElementById('ddet87874616'));expand(docume...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Frivolous Friday Five Christmas disease cow pox Doogie Howser Edward Jenner Haemophilia B IVF James Phipps Lorenzo's oil. Lorenzo Odone Louise Joy Brown small pox stephen christmas test tube baby Source Type: blogs
The children were the first to get sick. They spent Thanksgiving with sore throats and chills and fevers. By the end of the long weekend, the adults who had gathered for the family’s holiday meal in Phoenix were feeling flu symptoms, too. “We were all together for Thanksgiving, and the little kids got sick, then […]Related:Gene therapy makes a big advance treating hemophilia B blood disorderAn Illinois doctor traded drugs for sex and cash. He just pleaded guilty.The moral differences between pro- and anti-vaccine parents
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Jay Konduros used to rush home several times a year after accidentally cutting or bumping himself. There he would inject himself with refrigerated blood-clotting factor to prevent internal bleeding and extensive bruising and swelling. “I was walking on eggshells all the time,” said the former aerospace engineer who has a blood disorder called hemophilia B. Then, […]Related:The moral differences between pro- and anti-vaccine parents‘The Woebot will see you now’ — the rise of chatbot therapyA woman with a transplanted uterus just gave birth — a first for the U.S.
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
IntroductionSubcutaneous (SQ) vaccination has emerged as standard of care in children with severe bleeding disorders to reduce unnecessary factor exposure and avoid provoking an intramuscular bleed, but little is known about comparative immunogenicity to intramuscular (IM) vaccination. AimTo confirm immunogenicity of Diphtheria Tetanus acellular Pertussis (DTaP) vaccines administered SQ to individuals
Source: Haemophilia - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
High viscosity biologic drugs generally require syringe injections, but many patients are extremely uncomfortable around long needles and injection times can create a great deal of anxiety. Portal Instruments, a company out of Cambridge, Massachusetts, has developed a nearly automatic needle-free injector that reminds us of something doctors in science fiction movies would use. We spoke with Patrick Anquetil, CEO of Portal Instruments to find out exactly how a viscous liquid can be made to enter the body without a needle, what this means for the treatment of different diseases, and what additional features the company...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs
Abstract Plastid-made biopharmaceuticals treat major metabolic or genetic disorders, including Alzheimer's, diabetes, hypertension, hemophilia, and retinopathy. Booster vaccines made in chloroplasts prevent global infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis, malaria, cholera, and polio, and biological threats, such as anthrax and plague. Recent advances in this field include commercial-scale production of human therapeutic proteins in FDA-approved cGMP facilities, development of tags to deliver protein drugs to targeted human cells or tissues, methods to deliver precise doses, and long-term stability of protein drug...
Source: Annual Review of Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Annu Rev Genet Source Type: research
Abstract The event of mutations in the surface antigen gene of hepatitis B virus (HBV) results in undetectable hepatitis B surface antigen with positive/negative anti-hepatitis B core (anti-HBc) antibody status in serum and this phenomenon is named occult hepatitis B infection (OBI). The presence of anti-HBc antibody in serum is an important key for OBI tracking, although about 20% of OBI cases are negative for anti-HBc antibody. The diagnosis of OBI is mainly based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR assays. However, real-time PCR is a more reliable method than PCR. OBI is a great issue for the p...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Today, 1989 may be most associated with Taylor Swift: It is the album that won her a second Grammy for Album of the Year. Not only that, it happens to be the year Swift was born--such a long, long time ago! People under 35 have no personal memory of 1980s pop culture, which is ironic since Swift's album in part pays homage to it. In the real 1989 (no offense to Swift and the 10 co-producers who made the album), all sorts of revolutions took place: Mr. Gorbachev tore down that pesky wall, for example. America's greatest antagonist, the Soviet Union, collapsed in 1989. Brazil conducted its first democrat...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In haemophilia A (HA) management, antidrug antibodies, or inhibitors, are a serious complication that renders factor VIII (FVIII) replacement therapy ineffective, increases morbidity and reduces quality of life for affected patients. Inhibitor development aetiology is multifactorial and covers both genetic and therapy related risk factors. Many therapy‐related risk factors have proven difficult to confirm due to several confounding factors and the small study populations available. However, clinical studies indicate that e.g. on‐demand treatment and surgery affect inhibitor development, and explanations for this associ...
Source: Haemophilia - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
Inflammatory signals such as pathogen- and danger-associated molecular patterns have been hypothesized as risk factors for the initiation of the anti–factor VIII (FVIII) immune response seen in 25% to 30% of patients with severe hemophilia A (HA). In these young patients, vaccines may be coincidentally administered in close proximity with initial exposure to FVIII, thereby providing a source of such stimuli. Here, we investigated the effects of 3 vaccines commonly used in pediatric patients on FVIII immunogenicity in a humanized HA murine model with variable tolerance to recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII). Mice vaccin...
Source: Blood - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: Thrombosis and Hemostasis Source Type: research
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