Cardiosphere-Derived Cells and Ischemic Heart Failure

After a myocardial infarction, heart tissue becomes irreversibly damaged, leading to scar formation and inevitably ischemic heart failure. Of the many available interventions after a myocardial infarction, such as percutaneous intervention or pharmacological optimization, none can reverse the ischemic insult on the heart and restore cardiac function. Thus, the only available cure for patients with scarred myocardium is allogeneic heart transplantation, which comes with extensive costs, risks, and complications. However, multiple studies have shown that the heart is, in fact, not an end-stage organ and that there are endogenous mechanisms in place that have the potential to spark regeneration. Stem cell therapy has emerged as a potential tool to tap into and activate this endogenous framework. Particularly promising are stem cells derived from cardiac tissue itself, referred to as cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs). CDCs can be extracted and isolated from the patient’s myocardium and then administered by intramyocardial injection or intracoronary infusion. After early success in the animal model, multiple clinical trials have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of autologous CDC therapy in humans. Clinical trials with allogeneic CDCs showed early promising results and pose a potential “off-the-shelf” therapy for patients in the acute setting after a myocardial infarction. The mechanism responsible for CDC-induced cardiac regeneration seems to be a combination...
Source: Cardiology in Review - Category: Cardiology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research

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In this study, senescent cell distribution and quantity in vastus lateralis muscle were examined in young human adults after a single bout of resistance exercise. To determine the effects of dietary protein availability around exercise on senescent cell quantity and macrophage infiltration of skeletal muscle, two isocaloric protein supplements (14% and 44% in calorie) were ingested before and immediately after an acute bout of resistance exercise, in a counter-balanced crossover fashion. An additional parallel trial was conducted to compare the outcome of muscle mass increment under the same dietary conditions after 12 wee...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect globally, affecting almost nine in every 1,000 babies. Tissue engineering, which involves combining regenerative cells, proteins, or drugs with biomaterials, is a promising strategy to treat co...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Cardiac Surgery Exclusive Materials Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
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AbstractAimsWe have shown that extracellular vesicles (EVs) secreted by embryonic stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitor cells (Pg) recapitulate the therapeutic effects of their parent cells in a mouse model of chronic heart failure (CHF). Our objectives are to investigate whether EV released by more readily available cell sources are therapeutic, whether their effectiveness is influenced by the differentiation state of the secreting cell, and through which mechanisms they act.Methods and resultsThe total EV secreted by human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitors (iPSC-Pg) and human induced ...
Source: European Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
After a myocardial infarction, heart tissue becomes irreversibly damaged, leading to scar formation and inevitably ischemic heart failure. Of the many available interventions after a myocardial infarction, such as percutaneous intervention or pharmacological optimization, none can reverse the ischemic insult on the heart and restore cardiac function. Thus, the only available cure for patients with scarred myocardium is allogeneic heart transplantation, which comes with extensive costs, risks, and complications. However, multiple studies have shown that the heart is, in fact, not an end-stage organ and that there are endoge...
Source: Cardiology in Review - Category: Cardiology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research
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