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Cardiosphere-Derived Cells and Ischemic Heart Failure

After a myocardial infarction, heart tissue becomes irreversibly damaged, leading to scar formation and inevitably ischemic heart failure. Of the many available interventions after a myocardial infarction, such as percutaneous intervention or pharmacological optimization, none can reverse the ischemic insult on the heart and restore cardiac function. Thus, the only available cure for patients with scarred myocardium is allogeneic heart transplantation, which comes with extensive costs, risks, and complications. However, multiple studies have shown that the heart is, in fact, not an end-stage organ and that there are endogenous mechanisms in place that have the potential to spark regeneration. Stem cell therapy has emerged as a potential tool to tap into and activate this endogenous framework. Particularly promising are stem cells derived from cardiac tissue itself, referred to as cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs). CDCs can be extracted and isolated from the patient’s myocardium and then administered by intramyocardial injection or intracoronary infusion. After early success in the animal model, multiple clinical trials have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of autologous CDC therapy in humans. Clinical trials with allogeneic CDCs showed early promising results and pose a potential “off-the-shelf” therapy for patients in the acute setting after a myocardial infarction. The mechanism responsible for CDC-induced cardiac regeneration seems to be a combination...
Source: Cardiology in Review - Category: Cardiology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research

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In this study, we integrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular approaches to determine whether increased stiffness of aortic VSMCs in hypertensive rats is ROCK-dependent, and whether the anti-hypertensive effect of ROCK inhibitors contributes to the reduction of aortic stiffness via changing VSMC mechanical properties. Despite a widely held belief that aortic stiffening is associated with changes in extracellular matrix proteins and endothelial dysfunction, our recent studies demonstrated that intrinsic stiffening of aortic VSMCs, independent of VSMC proliferation and migration, is an important contributo...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we demonstrate that irrespective of the derivation of CD8+ CD45RA+CD27- T cells, these primed cells exhibit a unique highly inflammatory secretory profile characteristic of the SASP, and we also provide evidence that ADAM28 can be used as a functional marker of senescence in CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, we show that the secretory phenotype in CD8+ CD45RA+CD27- T cells is controlled through p38 MAPK signalling, which contributes to age-associated inflammation. Patient Paid Clinical Studies are a Good Plan for Rejuvenation Therapies https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/10/patient-paid-clinical-st...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Authors: Zhang M, Ai WW, Mei ZL, Hu YH, Zhang ZL Abstract Cell therapy is a promising approach for cardiac repair. The aim of the present study was to determine the feasibility of using biotinylated insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) with biotinylated self-assembling peptides (tethered IGF-1) combined with bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) transplantation for the treatment of heart failure. Tethered IGF-1 was synthesized and its effect on H9c2 cells was analyzed. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot assays demonstrated that tethered IGF-1 did not significantly affect the expr...
Source: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine - Category: General Medicine Tags: Exp Ther Med Source Type: research
In this study, we investigated the Hippo pathway, which is known from my lab's previous studies to prevent adult heart muscle cell proliferation and regeneration. When patients are in heart failure there is an increase in the activity of the Hippo pathway. This led us to think that if we could turn Hippo off, then we might be able to induce improvement in heart function." "We designed a mouse model to mimic the human condition of advanced heart failure. Once we reproduced a severe stage of injury in the mouse heart, we inhibited the Hippo pathway. After six weeks we observed that the injured hearts had rec...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Researchers here report on a cheaper implementation of encapsulation for transplanted stem cells, preventing the recipient's immune system from attacking cells originating from a different individual or even different species. Since the stem cells produce improvement in regeneration in heart tissue via signaling, there is no need to expose the cells themselves to the local environment - the cells are only needed at all because the signaling environment is not yet fully mapped and understood. Encapsulating transplanted cells in a nanogel extends their lifetime and thus the therapeutic effect. As a promising approa...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
This study didn't measure whether receiving the cardiosphere-derived cells extended lifespans, so we have a lot more work to do. We have much to study, including whether CDCs need to come from a young donor to have the same rejuvenating effects and whether the extracellular vesicles are able to reproduce all the rejuvenating effects we detect with CDCs." Cardiac and systemic rejuvenation after cardiosphere-derived cell therapy in senescent rats Cardiosphere-derived cell (CDC) therapy has exhibited several favourable effects on heart structure and function in humans and in preclinical models; however,...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 24 June 2017 Source:Pharmacological Research Author(s): Iolanda Aquila, Fabiola Marino, Eleonora Cianflone, Pina Marotta, Michele Torella, Vincenzo Mollace, Ciro Indolfi, Bernardo Nadal-Ginard, Daniele Torella The adult mammalian heart, including the human, is unable to regenerate segmental losses after myocardial infarction. This evidence has been widely and repeatedly used up-to-today to suggest that the myocardium, contrary to most adult tissues, lacks an endogenous stem cell population or more specifically a bona-fide cardiomyocyte-generating progenitor cell of biological significanc...
Source: Pharmacological Research - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Abstract Cardiac stem cells (CSCs) represent a logical cell type to exploit as a regenerative treatment option for tissue damage accrued as a result of a myocardial infarction. However, the isolation and expansion of CSCs prior to cell transplantation is time consuming, costly and invasive, and the reliability of cell expansion may also prove to be a major obstacle in the clinical application of CSC‐based transplantation therapy after a myocardial infarction. In order to overcome this, we propose the incorporation of growth factor‐eluting alginate microparticles into collagen‐based scaffolds as an implantable biomate...
Source: Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
More News: Cardiology | Clinical Trials | Heart | Heart Attack | Heart Failure | Heart Transplant | Stem Cell Therapy | Stem Cells | Study | Transplants