Study suggests hot flashes could be precursor to diabetes

(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) Hot flashes, undoubtedly the most common symptom of menopause, are not just uncomfortable and inconvenient, but numerous studies demonstrate they may increase the risk of serious health problems, including heart disease. A new study suggests that hot flashes (especially when accompanied by night sweats) also may increase the risk of developing diabetes. Results are being published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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Conclusions Supplementation with soy protein with isoflavones for 6 months significantly improved CVR markers and calculated CVR at 6 months during early menopause compared to soy protein without isoflavones. ISRCTN registry ISRCTN34051237.
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Conclusion: In post-menopausal women, lower HRV was associated with a modestly higher, but statistically significant, risk for incident cardiovascular events, including fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction. Factors associated with lower HRV and cardiac autonomic impairment may be candidates for reducing CHD risk, such as better glycemic control and improved physical activity.
Source: Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Session Title: Predicting the Future Source Type: research
Taking hormone replacement therapy during menopause may improve the structure and function of women's hearts, potentially lowering their risk of heart disease, say UK investigators.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - Category: Cardiology Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news
ConclusionsConsumption of soda was associated with adverse levels in a biomarker of inflammation and cardiovascular risk, serum CRP, in Mexican women. These results add to the accumulating evidence on soda and cardiovascular risk. More research is necessary to understand the potential impact of artificially sweetened sodas.
Source: Journal of Nutrition - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Our ancestors thrived on eating fish fresh from the ocean. After all, fish is a pure source of protein and healthy omega-3 fats. But our modern fish supply is vastly different than anything our ancestors ate. As our oceans have become more and more polluted, so has our seafood. In fact, the fish on your dinner plate today is likely loaded with plastic trash. Let me explain… Every year, billions of pounds of plastic waste pour into our oceans and rivers. I’m talking about things like grocery bags, drinking straws, water bottles and more. It’s now estimated that up to 51 trillion pieces of plastic c...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Health Nutrition dinner estrogen fat fish plastic testosterone thyroid function toxins weight Source Type: news
Your Body Mass Index (BMI) is a measurement of your body fat percentage. And based on the results, you are labeled normal, overweight or obese.   But BMI can give you some crazy results. Using this measurement, I’m considered obese. And so is NFL superstar Tom Brady. You see, BMI only compares your height against your weight. It doesn’t distinguish between fat and muscle. But here’s the thing… Muscle is much denser than fat. So if you have a lot of muscle, you can have a high BMI but still be lean. There’s a much more reliable test to measure your body’s composition of fat and mu...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
Conclusions: Long-term exposure to NO2 and road traffic noise was associated with higher risk of heart failure, mainly among men, in both single- and two-pollutant models. High exposure to both pollutants was associated with highest risk. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1272 Received: 25 October 2016 Revised: 09 August 2017 Accepted: 09 August 2017 Published: 26 September 2017 Address correspondence to M. Sørensen. Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. Telephone: +45 35257626. Email: mettes@cancer.dk Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusion This large pooled cohort study seems to demonstrate an association between a healthy plant-based diet and reduced risk of coronary heart disease, and an increased risk of heart disease with an unhealthy plant-based diet. This adds to the evidence base supporting the possible benefits of healthy plant-based diets in protecting against certain illnesses. However there are some limitations to the research: The cohort included only health professionals from the US so might not be representative of wider populations in the UK or elsewhere. The study can't provide information on the benefits or otherwise of this d...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news
Conclusion This study, conducted on a large number of people across Europe, was backed up by similar findings in the US. It appears to show some association between people who drink higher amounts of coffee and a reduced risk of death. But the "potentially beneficial clinical implications" need to be considered carefully for a number of reasons: Although the analyses were adjusted for some confounding variables, there may be a number of other factors that differ between the groups that account for the differences in death, such as socioeconomic status, family history, other medical conditions, and use of medic...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news
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