Lower back pain: STRESS is most common cause, claims Chartered Society of Physiotherapy

BACK pain - especially in the lower back - is a common problem that will affect about 80 per cent of people at some point in their lifetime. But, most of the time there ’s absolutely nothing to worry about, said The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy .
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

Condition:   Low Back Pain, Mechanical Interventions:   Other: Mezieres Method;   Other: Conventional Physiotherapy Sponsors:   Universidad de la Sabana;   Universidad Ramón Llull Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
ConclusionThe study was the first to investigate individual perceptions of the impact of Pilates on the daily lives of people with chronic conditions. The Pilates ‐based exercise programme enabled the participants to function better and manage their condition more effectively and independently. Further to previous work, the study revealed psychological and social benefits which increase motivation to adhere to the programme and promote a healthier lifestyle .
Source: Musculoskeletal Care - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
Today’s post is occasioned by reading several discussions on various forums where the term “pain science” and various adjectives to describe this kind of practice. For those who don’t want to read the rest of my ramblings: no, it’s not a thing, science is an approach to understanding phenomena, and I would have thought all health professionals would use a science-based approach to treatment. I went on to Google, as you do, to find out when this term began its rise in popularity. Google wasn’t particularly helpful but did show that it’s been around since 2004 at least, and seems to...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Assessment Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Education Low back pain Pain conditions Professional topics Research Science in practice biopsychosocial interprofessional multidimensional pain management pain science Source Type: blogs
Prompted by reading a paper by Linton, Nicholas and Shaw (in press), today’s post is about various service delivery models for low back pain and not the content of back pain treatment. Service delivery in New Zealand is assumed to be based on getting most bang for the buck: we have a mainly socialised healthcare system, along with a unique “no fault, 24 hour” insurance model for accidents whether at work or elsewhere, which means market forces existing in other countries are less dominant. There are, however, many other influences on what gets delivered and to whom. Back to most bang for buck. With a l...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Back pain Interdisciplinary teams Low back pain Professional topics Research Science in practice health systems treatment Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: Stabilization exercises seem to decrease chronic low back pain, although it is not clear that this pain has to be caused by clinical spinal instability. Caution should be exercised when using CPRs in the clinic; they are not meant to be strict treatment guidelines, but rather a tool that helps facilitate clinical decision-making. PMID: 30347593 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil Source Type: research
BACK PAIN is a very common problem, which many people experience at some point in their lives. But treatment options can be confusing - how do you know if you should see a chiropractor, osteopath or physiotherapist?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
BACK PAIN is a very common problem, which many people experience at some point in their lives. But treatment options can be confusing - how do you know if you should see a chiropractor, osteopath or physiotherapist?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
If you are one of the more than 100 million Americans suffering with chronic pain, you know how desperate you can get searching for relief. For constant or chronic pain, sometimes knowing that you can only get temporary relief from medications sits at the back of your brain and sets up pain anticipation. Shouldn’t there be a better way, an approach or approaches that don’t rely on pharmaceutical drugs to combat pain? According to new research, there are some new pain relief methods that look very promising to do just that. Treatment from Strangers Mat Provide Unexpected Pain Relief It may seem counter-intuitiv...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Chronic Pain Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Psychology Research Treatment Source Type: blogs
Authors: Ansari NN, Komesh S, Naghdi S, Fakhari Z, Alaei P Abstract Study Design: A prospective, within-group cohort study of 46 patients with chronic low-back pain (CLBP). Purpose: To assess the responsiveness of the Persian Functional Rating Index (PFRI) and to determine the minimal clinically important change (MCIC) of the PFRI in a cohort of patients with CLBP. Overview of Literature: The FRI is an instrument for assessing pain and disability in patients with low-back pain. No study so far has examined the responsiveness of the PFRI. Methods: Forty-six patients with CLBP with a mean age of 50.33&plu...
Source: Asian Spine Journal - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Asian Spine J Source Type: research
Globally, non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) is a common cause of morbidity in all people including physiotherapy students. However, no study has investigated the problem among undergraduate physiotherapy stud...
Source: BMC Research Notes - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Research note Source Type: research
More News: Back Pain | Health | Low Back Pain | Pain | Physiotherapy