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Book Review: The Ethics of Caring

Caring is a universal force that compels healers all of kinds, from therapists to bodyworkers. Yet, as much as we are all drawn to the desire to help, really helping someone depends not just on desire, but on truly understanding the ethics of caring. In her new book, The Ethics of Caring: Finding Professional Right Relationship with Clients for Practicing Professionals, Students, Teachers &Mentors, Kylea Taylor illuminates just what is necessary to offer an authentic relationship where genuine transformation can occur, and to utilize the tremendous power of shared energy — felt in transference and counter-transference — to invoke powerful change. “These intense shared experiences that arise for many clients in the context of a professional healing relationship can bring to the surface compelling, and often unconscious, fears, needs, and longings in both the client and the professional.” It is precisely through exploring these deeper ends of the spectrum of human experience that profound healing and transformation occurs, and within which, according to Taylor, a broader range of human experience and expression can be found. Beyond the outward definitions of ethics, we have inner ethics, where through ongoing internal self-examination, we discover our own values and motivations. This sense of inner ethics becomes especially important for therapists when sharing extraordinary states of consciousness with their clients. “I have come to believe th...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Book Reviews Professional Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Trauma Treatment ethical principles ethics of caring mentor relationship practicing ethics Therapeutic Relationship Source Type: news

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Depression is the leading cause of disability in the United States among people ages 15 to 44. While there are many effective treatments for depression, first-line approaches such as antidepressants and psychotherapy do not work for everyone. In fact, approximately two-thirds of people with depression don’t get adequate relief from the first antidepressant they try. After 2 months of treatment, at least some symptoms will remain for these individuals, and each subsequent medication tried is actually less likely to help than the one prior. What can people with depression do when they do not respond to first-line treat...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Brain and cognitive health Mental Health Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Benefits were not seen for trauma-focused counseling when compared with an active control intervention. Nonetheless, in distressed ACS patients, individual, single-session, early psychological counseling shows potential as a means to prevent posttraumatic responses, but trauma-focused early treatments should probably be avoided.Psychother Psychosom
Source: Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is psychological trauma that effects on somatic, cognitive-affective, and behavioral. The goals of treatment to persons who have PTSD to decreasing functional impairment, building resilience, reducing symptom severity,...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
“The possibility of stepping into a higher plane is quite real for everyone. It requires no force or effort or sacrifice. It involves little more than changing our ideas about what is normal.” – Deepak Chopra When I was a young girl, I often felt as if I was not normal. It wasn’t that I had a noticeable birth defect or considered myself ugly or stupid, though. My feelings likely stemmed more from a sense that I was too sensitive or fragile or in need of protection and couldn’t stand up for myself. I had an older brother who sometimes was tough on me, yet I loved him dearly. He was my protector...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Habits Happiness Inspiration & Hope Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Personal Self-Esteem Self-Help Awkwardness base line Comparison competition Coping Insecurity loss Normalcy Resilience self-compassion Source Type: blogs
The American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic Standards Manual, Edition V (2013) reports that between 2 and 6% of the general population have a hoarding disorder. Once considered a type of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), hoarding is now regarded as a serious clinical condition co-morbid with diagnoses of depression, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorders, attention deficit disorder, and sometimes psychosis given the delusional levels of denial that hoarders often present (Frost, Stekelee, Tolin, 2011). Hoarders engage in excessive acquisition of items, whether those items have real world value or not,...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Anxiety Caregivers Children and Teens Essays Family Grief and Loss Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Personality Psychodynamic Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Trauma Treatment Abuse Anxiety Disorder bullying Comorb Source Type: news
AbstractTo derive a method of identifying use of evidence-based psychotherapy (EBP) for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), we used clinical note text from national Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical records. Using natural language processing, we developed machine-learning algorithms to classify note text on a large scale in an observational study of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans with PTSD and one post-deployment psychotherapy visit by 8/5/15 (N  = 255,968). PTSD visits were linked to 8.1 million psychotherapy notes. Annotators labeled 3467 randomly-selected psychotherapy notes (kappa&thinsp...
Source: Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
The objective of this exploratory study was to gain insight into the auditory perception of these patients and into opportunities of musical improvisation in the treatment of patients with complex PTSD. The study design combined a clinical and a psychoacoustic part. The clinical part investigated subjective comments on unpleasant sound perception in music therapy. In the psychoacoustic part, hearing thresholds and levels at most comfortable loudness (MCL) were measured using a standard audiometer. Evaluation of 24 group music therapy sessions revealed that the participants of this study communicated discomfort towards soun...
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Condition:   PTSD Interventions:   Behavioral: STAIR;   Behavioral: PCT Sponsors:   VA Office of Research and Development;   San Diego Veterans Healthcare System Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Amassing research findings suggests that religious faith and/or spirituality (R/S) can both help and hinder recovery from mental health conditions that might prompt military veterans to seek psychotherapy or counseling. As such, there is increasing interest among psychologists and other professionals working with military populations in the helpfulness of addressing the R/S domain. However, research has yet to examine veterans’ actual preferences for integrating R/S in their treatment. Drawing on two samples with heterogeneity in R/S backgrounds and military-related experiences, results revealed that veterans general...
Source: Professional Psychology: Research and Practice - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
In conclusion, I am deeply moved by your experiences, and don’t feel completely worthy to speak about your experiences. To you who are Marines, in the AF we called you “Gyrenes”. We are not worthy to unfasten your combat boots, and I readily admit that I served in the “cub scouts” of the armed forces as one ex-armine observed when visiting The Wall! This guest article originally appeared on the award-winning health and science blog and brain-themed community, BrainBlogger: Musings of a Combat Professor, Former AF Medic, and Retired Psychologist.
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain Blogger Disorders Military Personal PTSD Publishers Trauma Aggression combat killing Veterans violence war Source Type: blogs
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