3D-printed kidney helps optimize SPECT/CT quantification

Low-cost, 3D-printed kidney phantoms provide shape-specific details that improve...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 3D-printed model helps prepare for stroke clot removal 3D printing shortens hip surgery times, lowers costs 3D printing helps evaluate leaks after TAVR procedures New therapeutic agent could treat prostate cancer 3D-printed kidney phantom advances SPECT/CT calibration
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 11 September 2018Source: Journal of Vascular and Interventional RadiologyAuthor(s): Shivank Bhatia, Vishal K. Sinha, Sardis Harward, Christopher Gomez, Bruce R. Kava, Dipen J. ParekhAbstractPurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of prostate artery embolization (PAE) for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia for prostates ≥ 80 mL.Patients and MethodsA retrospective review was conducted of 93 patients with prostate volumes (PVs) ≥ 80 mL treated with PAE from April 2014 through October 2017. Mean patient age was 68.5 years (range 52–88) and mean age-adjusted Charlson ...
Source: Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Screening for carotid artery stenosis, prediabetes, and thyroid cancer in an asymptomatic population can result in unnecessary, harmful, and costly care. Systemic challenges to lowering overscreening include lack of clinician awareness, examination of conflicts of interests, perverse financial incentives, and communication with the general public. PMID: 29988604 [PubMed]
Source: Public Health Reviews - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Public Health Rev Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 4 July 2018Source: Journal of Clinical NeuroscienceAuthor(s): Andrew Nunno, Mahlon D. Johnson, Guan Wu, Yan Michael LiAbstractOccurrences of metastatic prostate cancer imitating a subdural hematoma are limited to a small number of case reports, even though prostate cancer spreads to the dura more than other types of cancer. Here, we present the case of a 64 year-old male whose prostate carcinoma’s metastasis mimicked a subdural hematoma, and he suffered a middle cerebral artery stroke. Prostate cancer’s high rate of progression to the dura is disproportionate to its relative...
Source: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Abstract Occurrences of metastatic prostate cancer imitating a subdural hematoma are limited to a small number of case reports, even though prostate cancer spreads to the dura more than other types of cancer. Here, we present the case of a 64 year-old male whose prostate carcinoma's metastasis mimicked a subdural hematoma, and he suffered a middle cerebral artery stroke. Prostate cancer's high rate of progression to the dura is disproportionate to its relatively low rate of brain metastasis. Furthermore, we explore the potential molecular implications of prostate cancer's propensity to spread to the dura. P...
Source: Clinical Prostate Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: J Clin Neurosci Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 4 July 2018 Source:Journal of Clinical Neuroscience Author(s): Andrew Nunno, Mahlon D. Johnson, Guan Wu, Yan Michael Li Occurrences of metastatic prostate cancer imitating a subdural hematoma are limited to a small number of case reports, even though prostate cancer spreads to the dura more than other types of cancer. Here, we present the case of a 64 year-old male whose prostate carcinoma’s metastasis mimicked a subdural hematoma, and he suffered a middle cerebral artery stroke. Prostate cancer’s high rate of progression to the dura is disproportionate to its relatively lo...
Source: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
By SAURABH JHA Of my time arguing with doctors, 30 % is spent convincing British doctors that their American counterparts aren’t idiots, 30 % convincing American doctors that British doctors aren’t idiots, and 40 % convincing both that I’m not an idiot. A British doctor once earnestly asked whether American physicians carry credit card reading machines inside their white coats. Myths about the NHS can be equally comical. British doctors don’t prostate every morning in deference to the NHS, like the citizens of Oceania sang to Big Brother in Orwell’s dystopia. Nor, in their daily rounds, do the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: OP-ED Uncategorized AlfieEvans Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: AF patients with cancer were less likely to see a cardiologist, and less likely to fill an anticoagulant prescription than AF patients without cancer. However, cardiology involvement was associated with increased anticoagulant prescription fills and reduced risk of stroke, suggesting a beneficial role for cardiology providers to improve outcomes in AF patients with history of cancer.
Source: Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Session Title: Poster Session Reception: Young Investigator Award Semi-Finalists Source Type: research
By ANISH KOKA, MD The study that changed everything was published last week.  An alien visiting the national cardiology meeting in Orlando may have thought that the trial of note was the one that featured the culmination of one hundred years of lipid research to develop an inhibitor of the enzyme PCSK9 (Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) that lowers lipids and reduces the risk of future heart attacks. The Martian would be wrong. The trial that has cardiologists across the land choking back tears is a hypertension study done in black barbershops.  The idea is fairly simple.  Black men have th...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
By ANISH KOKA, MD The study that changed everything was published last week.  An alien visiting the national cardiology meeting in Orlando may have thought that the trial of note was the one that featured the culmination of one hundred years of lipid research to develop an inhibitor of the enzyme PCSK9 (Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) that lowers lipids and reduces the risk of future heart attacks. The Martian would be wrong. The trial that has cardiologists across the land choking back tears is a hypertension study done in black barbershops.  The idea is fairly simple.  Black men have th...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
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