Lab-grown ovaries could replace drugs for menopausal women

New research in rats by Wake Forest in North Carolina found bioengineering artificial ovaries could provide a safer and more natural hormone replacement therapy for women.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 30 June 2018Source: Reproductive BioMedicine OnlineAuthor(s): Jacques Donnez, Marie-Madeleine DolmansAbstractAt the dawn of humanity, it was rare to live beyond the age of 35 years, so the ovary was intended to function for a woman's entire life. Nowadays, it is not unusual for women to live into their 80s. This means that many of them spend 30–40% of their lives in the menopause at increased risk of various conditions associated with an absence of oestrogens (cardiovascular disease, bone mineral density loss). Reimplantation of frozen–thawed ovarian tissue is able to restore ...
Source: Reproductive BioMedicine Online - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract There is increasing evidence that menopause is associated with the progression and severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Estrogen deficiency worsens non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in mice models with fatty liver. The prevalence of NAFLD seems to be higher in postmenopausal compared with premenopausal women. Although more data are needed, lower serum estradiol levels are associated with NASH in postmenopausal women. Apart from estrogen deficiency, relative androgen excess and decrease in sex hormone-binding protein are observed in postmenopausal women. These hormonal changes seem to ...
Source: Current Vascular Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Vasc Pharmacol Source Type: research
Scientists at the University of Washington have shown we could target a neuron rather than estrogen levels with drugs. Hormone replacement therapy reduces hot flashes but increases stroke risk.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This study aimed to improve the process conditions for biotransformation of soymilk polyphenols by tannase to obtain higher amounts of isoflavone aglycones and metabolites such as equol. The estrogenic potential of the extracts was evaluated in in vitro assays. The results showed that the aglycones increased 36–46 times after reaction with tannase and proved that it is possible to produce equol in soymilk using an enzymatic bioprocess, without gut microbial intervention. Moreover, the soymilk biotransformed by tannase presented higher estrogenic action in the MCF-7 BUS cell line assay, making it a promising nutraceut...
Source: Journal of Functional Foods - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 30 June 2018Source: Reproductive BioMedicine OnlineAuthor(s): Jacques Donnez, Marie-Madeleine DolmansAbstractAt the dawn of humanity, it was rare to live beyond the age of 35 years, so the ovary was intended to function for a woman's entire life. Nowadays, it is not unusual for women to live into their 80s. This means that many of them spend 30–40% of their lives in the menopause at increased risk of various conditions associated with an absence of oestrogens (cardiovascular disease, bone mineral density loss). Reimplantation of frozen–thawed ovarian tissue is able to restore ...
Source: Reproductive BioMedicine Online - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Proteomic biomarkers in participants with cognitive impairment suggest roles for insulin, and vascular signaling pathways, some of which are similar to findings in Alzheimer's disease. A better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of CI in OSAS will help focus clinical trials needed in this patient population. PMID: 29968150 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Genomics Proteomics ... - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Sleep Breath Source Type: research
ConclusionsProteomic biomarkers in participants with cognitive impairment suggest roles for insulin, and vascular signaling pathways, some of which are similar to findings in Alzheimer ’s disease. A better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of CI in OSAS will help focus clinical trials needed in this patient population.
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 30 June 2018 Source:Reproductive BioMedicine Online Author(s): Jacques Donnez, Marie-Madeleine Dolmans At the dawn of humanity, it was rare to live beyond the age of 35 years, so the ovary was intended to function for a woman's entire life. Nowadays, it is not unusual for women to live into their 80s. This means that many of them spend 30–40% of their lives in the menopause at increased risk of various conditions associated with an absence of oestrogens (cardiovascular disease, bone mineral density loss). Reimplantation of frozen–thawed ovarian tissue is able to restore long-...
Source: Reproductive BioMedicine Online - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research, EarlyView.
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionsAsian HRT users had a higher risk of breast cancer than western HRT users. Both ET and EPT were significantly associated with the risk of all breast cancer histological types and ER-positive breast cancer.
Source: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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