When Medicines Don ’t Work Anymore

Credit: BigstockBy Martin KhorPENANG, Malaysia, Dec 4 2017 (IPS)The growing crisis of antibiotic resistance is catching the attention of policy makers, but not at a rate enough to tackle it.More diseases are affected by resistance, meaning the bacteria cannot be killed even if different drugs are used on some patients, who then succumb.We are staring at a future in which antibiotics don’t work, and many of us or our children will not be saved from TB, cholera, deadly forms of dysentery, and germs contracted during surgery.Martin Khor, Executive Director of the South Centre, a think tank for developing countries, based in GenevaThe World Health Organisation will discuss a resolution in May at its annual assembly of Health Ministers on microbial resistance, including a global action plan. There have been such resolutions before but little action.This year may be different, because powerful countries like the United Kingdom are now convinced that years of inaction have caused the problem to fester, until it has grown to mind-boggling proportions.The UK-based Chatham House held two meetings last October and last month (together with the Geneva Graduate Institute) on this issue, both presided over by the Chief Medical Officer of England, Prof. Dame Sally Davies.This remarkable woman has taken on antibiotic resistance as a professional and personal campaign. In a recent book, “The drugs don’t work”,  she revealed that for her annual health report, she d...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Global Global Governance Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

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Authors: Lambraño J, Curtidor H, Avendaño C, Díaz-Arévalo D, Roa L, Vanegas M, Patarroyo ME, Patarroyo MA Abstract Malaria continues being a high-impact disease regarding public health worldwide; the WHO report for malaria in 2018 estimated that ~219 million cases occurred in 2017, mostly caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The disease cost the lives of more than 400,000 people, mainly in Africa. In spite of great efforts aimed at developing better prevention (i.e., a highly effective vaccine), diagnosis, and treatment methods for malaria, no efficient solution to this disease ...
Source: Journal of Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: J Immunol Res Source Type: research
Authors: Cai W, Kesavan DK, Cheng J, Vasudevan A, Wang H, Wan J, Abdelaziz MH, Su Z, Wang S, Xu H Abstract Acinetobacter baumannii, as a nonfermentation Gram-negative bacterium, mainly cause nosocomial infections in critically ill patients. With the widespread of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, the urgency of developing effective therapy options has been emphasized nowadays. Outer membrane vesicles derived from bacteria show potential vaccine effects against bacterial infection in recent study. Our present research is aimed at investigating the mechanisms involved in immune protection of mice after out...
Source: Journal of Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: J Immunol Res Source Type: research
In conclusion, our results suggested that AVNP2 could have an effect on the peri-tumor environment, obviously restraining the growth progress of gliomas, and eventually improving cognitive levels in C6-bearing rats.
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 27 January 2020Source: Current Medicine Research and PracticeAuthor(s): K.K. Chopra, Shweta SinghAbstractTuberculosis (TB) has remained a disease of public health importance since ages, affecting more than 10 million people globally and taking lives of 2 million people worldwide every year. Despite the dramatic improvements made in providing high-quality TB diagnostic services, since the discovery of the causative bacilli, many people with TB remain undiagnosed or get diagnosed only after long delays. Ten countries account for 77% of this gap and use only smear microscopy for diagnosis, w...
Source: Current Medicine Research and Practice - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Here are the results of the poll.Do You Believe The COVID-19 Outbreak Poses A Substantial Threat To The Australian Economy When Added To The Drought, Floods and Bushfires We Have Already Seen?Yes 63% (38) No 33% (20) I Have No Idea 3% (2) Total votes: 60 A fairly clear majority vote. Most seem to think all this will knock us about a bit. Any insights on the poll welcome as a comment, as usual. A very poor turn out of votes. Pity about that - must have been a boring question? It must also hav e been a relatively hard question as 2/60 readers were not sure how to respond. Again, many, many thanks to all those that...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 22 February 2020Source: Microbes and InfectionAuthor(s): Luiza Carvalho Mourão, Camila Maia Pantuzzo Medeiros, Gustavo Pereira Cardoso-Oliveira, Paula Magda da Silva Roma, Jamila da Silva Sultane Aboobacar, Beatriz Carolina Medeiros Rodrigues, Ubirajara Agero, Cor Jesus Fernandes Fontes, Érika Martins BragaAbstractAutoantibodies play an important role in the destruction of non-infected red blood cells (nRBCs) during malaria. However, the relationship between this clearance and ABO blood groups is yet to be fully enlightened, especially for Plasmodium vivax infections. Here w...
Source: Microbes and Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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Source: Microbes and Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 February 2020Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Sarah Jolivet, Isabelle Lolom, Sébastien Bailly, Lila Bouadma, Brice Lortat-Jacob, Philippe Montravers, Laurence Armand-Lefevre, Jean-François Timsit, Jean-Christophe LucetSummaryBackgroundColonisation pressure is a risk factor for intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs).AimTo measure the long-term respective impact of colonisation pressure on ICU-acquired extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) and meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRS...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
ConclusionThe probability of virus detection is independent of the time between notification of the outbreak or symptom onset and sample collection. Our results suggest possible defects in cleaning protocols and disinfection in closed and semi-closed settings.
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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