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Global Health: ‘ Opiophobia ’ Has Left Africa in Agony

Uganda has a strategy for giving scarce morphine to patients in pain. But many poor nations won ’ t emulate its effort because officials fear an opioid epidemic.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Pain-Relieving Drugs Hospice Care Morphine Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Cancer Uganda Source Type: news

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Ladies and Gentlemen, this is the moment you have all been waiting for – the day that the winners of the Medgadget Medical Sci-Fi Competition are announced and their fantastic stories are published! First, we would like to thank Eko Devices, the wonderful sponsors of our contest, that make the coolest and most advanced digital stethoscopes out there.The winner of our contest will receive an Eko CORE stethoscope that is both acoustic and electronic, has all the features of both, can amplify sound, record audio waveforms, and connect to your phone. Thank you, Eko! Since we announced our Medical Sci-Fi Writing Contest i...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs
Opioids have been a topic of discussion for months now, and every week it seems as though a new company or individual is in hot water over opioid prescribing practices, or over alleged opioid prescribing practices. One facet of the opioid epidemic that has not been touched upon is the requirement many pain management physicians and others have that when a patient is under their care and receiving opioids and/or habit-forming prescriptions, the patient must affirm that they are not seeing other physicians for prescriptions and/or that all prescriptions are being filled at the same pharmacy. To that end, the patient typical...
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
AbstractThe practice of chronic opioid prescription for chronic non-cancer pain has come under considerable scrutiny within the past several years as mounting evidence reveals a generally unfavorable risk to benefit ratio and the nation reels from the grim mortality statistics associated with the opioid epidemic. Patients struggling with chronic pain tend to use opioids and also seek out operative intervention for their complaints, which combination may be leading to increased postoperative “acute-on-chronic” pain and fueling worsened chronic pain and opioid dependence.Besides worsened postoperative pain, a gro...
Source: Perioperative Medicine - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Prescription opioid abuse is one of the United States’ greatest public health challenges. Approximately 97.5 million Americans consume opioids annually, and around 90 people die every day from opioid overuse. The last time in recent history a health care crisis garnered this much public attention was following the release of the 1964 “Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health” correlating smoking to heart disease and cancer. Today, we hear stories like a coroner reporting — for the second time this year — that he has run out of storage space for bodies due to rising opioid...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Policy Pain Management Primary Care Public Health & Source Type: blogs
The widespread U.S. opioid &overdose crisis is an ever-increasing tragic concern for everyone: writhing victims, family members being fain to see their relatives suffer or die, doctors prescribing opioid pain-killers what they thought before as safe, and regulators imposed to handle a tough situation. Addiction. It’s painful to even read about the skyrocketing numbers of people suffering, thus we decided to map how digital health could help tackle the opioid crisis. Why is it so difficult to deal with the opioid crisis? Once you become addicted, it sticks with you for a long time, if not for life, just as a ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Bioethics Mobile Health Virtual Reality in Medicine AI artificial intelligence data data analytics drugs future gc3 Innovation opioid opioid crisis pharma technology wearables Source Type: blogs
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Funding available! The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region, is accepting applications for health information outreach, health literacy initiatives, emergency preparedness partnerships and health sciences library projects. Applications will be due by COB on December 1. See a recent blog post from Executive Director, Kate Flewelling for details, or review our funding opportunities and start your application today! Apply Today! Health science librarians are invited to participate in a rigorous onl...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news
Pain is common in those with a life-threatening illness, yet barriers to adequate treatment persist. New challenges add to the well-known barriers of limited education, lack of time, and impaired access to expert treatment. The opioid abuse epidemic and the rising rate of deaths related to misuse of opioids present new obstacles to cancer pain relief. Although many of the efforts to reduce the impact of the opioid epidemic are important to the community, there are unintended consequences. When facing these challenges, ethical principles serve as a guide to the provision of safe and effective pain control in hospice and pal...
Source: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Ethics Series Source Type: research
In 2015, the opioid crisis was escalating to emergency-level proportions, claiming as many lives as car accidents. As the daughter of a longtime drug addict, the current burgeoning opioid epidemic managed to be both familiar and strange to me at the same time. My mother developed her addictions during the height of drug epidemics that occurred in New York City in the mid-1980s. The timeframe also marked the infancy of the AIDS crisis and the height of Reagan-era “Just Say No” programs. Back then, addiction was treated and viewed more as a crime than a disease, supposedly committed by scoundrels and misfits. The...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Behavioral Health Source Type: blogs
Late last week, John N. Kapoor, the founder and majority owner of Insys Therapeutics, Inc., was arrested and charged with leading a conspiracy to profit by using bribes and fraud to cause the illegal distribution of a Fentanyl spray intended for cancer patients experiencing breakthrough pain. The superseding indictment includes allegations of RICO conspiracy, conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, and conspiracy to violate the Anti-Kickback law. It also includes additional allegations against former Insys executives and managers who were initially indicted in December 2016. The Justice Department claims that Kapoor an...
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
The billionaire founder of Insys Therapeutics Inc was arrested on Thursday on U.S. charges he participated in a scheme to bribe doctors to prescribe a fentanyl-based cancer pain drug, marking a step by authorities to fight the opioid epidemic.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news
More News: African Health | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Epidemics | Epidemiology | Health | Morphine | Pain | Uganda Health