Can CME Help the Opioid Epidemic?

Conclusion Therefore, POLITICO and the stakeholders made a policy recommendation focused on educating providers. They suggest that education on both pain management and addiction has to start in medical school. However, early education is not enough unless it is supplemented by CME. The medical field should continue the progress it has made increasing education around proper prescribing, but it should increase its efforts by evaluating doctors in some meaningful way such as on licensing exams or through CME.       Related StoriesACCME Introduces Guidance for CME Providers in Europe and AsiaUrine Testing: The Next Shoe to Drop?Senate HELP Committee Holds Hearing on Opioid Response 
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs

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See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight The MAReport: the Summer/Fall 2018 issue of the MAReport newsletter is now available! This quarter, Executive Director Kate Flewelling wrote about how the National Library of Medicine and National Network of Libraries of Medicine are responding to the opioid crisis, including details on a new class that will be offered for the first time on November 28. National Network of Libraries of Medicine News Funding Applications Due: NNLM MAR has funding available for two grants of $19,000. Libraries, community-based organizations, ...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news
ConclusionsOur current opioid prescription practice for postoperative pain management may exceed what patients need.
Source: International Urogynecology Journal - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
A guest column by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, exclusive to KevinMD.com. Every physician takes the Hippocratic oath and promises to “do no harm.” In the face of the current opioid epidemic, this includes protecting our patients from dependence and addiction, including those who are suffering from debilitating acute and chronic pain. Sometimes this involves getting creative as we develop treatment plans. Luckily, opioids are not the only, nor always the best, defense against pain. One patient who avoided the negative side effects of long-term opioid use was Beth Hunt. Beth was living life...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Pain Management Surgery Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: A high prevalence of opioid-related mortality was detected in both counties, specifically for Camden County, between the years of 2013 and 2015. An increasing incidence of opioids, specifically heroin and oxycodone, was also detected. Although prescription opioids might contribute to the initial development of addiction, the sudden suspension of these resources, without adequate treatment, can often lead individuals to shift to heroin as cheaper and more potent resource of opioids. Physician education and changing the prescribing patterns as well as harm reduction strategies are needed. For acute pain, the re...
Source: Addictive Disorders and Their Treatment - Category: Addiction Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
This article reviews pharmacological principles and research strategies aiming at novel opioids with reduced side effects. Basic mechanisms underlying pain, opioid analgesia and other opioid actions are outlined. To illustrate the clinical situation and medical needs, plasticity of opioid receptors, intracellular signaling pathways, endogenous and exogenous opioid receptor ligands, central and peripheral sites of analgesic and side effects are discussed. Expert opinion: The epidemic of opioid misuse has taught us that there is a lack of fundamental knowledge about the characteristics and management of chronic pain, that co...
Source: Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Expert Opin Investig Drugs Source Type: research
Publication date: May–June 2018Source: EXPLORE, Volume 14, Issue 3Author(s): Heather Tick, Arya Nielsen, Kenneth R. Pelletier, Robert Bonakdar, Samantha Simmons, Ronald Glick, Emily Ratner, Russell L. Lemmon, Peter Wayne, Veronica Zador, The Pain Task Force of the Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and HealthABSTRACTMedical pain management is in crisis; from the pervasiveness of pain to inadequate pain treatment, from the escalation of prescription opioids to an epidemic in addiction, diversion and overdose deaths. The rising costs of pain care and managing adverse effects of that care have prompted action ...
Source: EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
I have written previously about the raging opioid epidemic in Ohio.  Attacking and reversing this tidal wave will require many weapons, resources and time.  Opioid addiction is a crafty and elusive adversary that will be difficult to vanquish.  Our battle plan will have to be nimble and adjusted over time, much as military leaders must do in actual armed conflict. Here in Ohio and elsewhere, physicians must abide by new prescribing restrictions.  Prior to prescribing a controlled pain medicine, doctors are required to check the patients OARRS report online, which catalogues the ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 1 March 2018 Source:EXPLORE Author(s): Heather Tick, Arya Nielsen, Kenneth R. Pelletier, Robert Bonakdar, Samantha Simmons, Ronald Glick, Emily Ratner, Russell L. Lemmon, Peter Wayne, Veronica Zador Consortium Pain Taskforce White Paper Summary Evidence-based Nonpharmacologic Strategies for Comprehensive Pain Care Supplementary information can be found in the online version at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.explore.2018.02.001. Medical pain management is in crisis; from the pervasiveness of pain to inadequate pain treatment, from the escalation of prescription opioids to an epidemic in addict...
Source: EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract Opioid analgesics are commonly used to treat acute and chronic pain; in 2016 alone, more than 60 million patients had at least 1 prescription for opioid analgesics filled or refilled. Despite the ubiquitous use of these agents, the effectiveness of long-term use of opioids for chronic noncancer pain management is questionable, yet links among long-term use, addiction, and overdose deaths are well established. Because of overprescribing and misuse, an opioid epidemic has developed in the United States. The health and economic burdens of opioid abuse on individuals, their families, and society are substanti...
Source: The American Journal of Managed Care - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Am J Manag Care Source Type: research
(TRENTON, N.J.) — New data show that the number of prescriptions for opioid painkillers filled in the U.S. fell dramatically last year. They showed their biggest drop in 25 years. The decline comes amid increasing legal restrictions and public awareness of the dangers of addiction. A health data firm released a report Thursday showing a 9 percent average drop nationwide in the number of prescriptions for opioids filled by retail and mail-order pharmacies. All 50 states and the District of Columbia had declines of more than 5 percent. The U.S. is estimated to consume roughly 30 percent of all opioids used worldwide. ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news
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