Going beyond prescription pain relievers to understand the opioid epidemic: the role of illicit fentanyl, new psychoactive substances, and street heroin.

The objective of this narrative review is to consider the roles of all substances that contribute to the opioid epidemic in America. PMID: 29190175 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Postgraduate Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Postgrad Med Source Type: research

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“It is borderline genocide,” said DeLuca, 37. “You are allowing [chronic pain patients] to go home and essentially suffer until they kill themselves.” Last year, Lauren DeLuca went to the emergency room in the middle of the night, violently ill and in pain with a pancreatic attack. Despite the fact that she was passing out and vomiting profusely, DeLuca said that she received little help. “I was essentially turned away,” she told The Fix. “Everywhere [I went] I was being accused of lying, accused of making it up.” Over the next three weeks, DeLuca lost 20 pounds, unable to ea...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Disorders Health-related Medications Publishers Substance Abuse The Fix Chronic Pain opioid addiction Opioids Source Type: blogs
We  learned last week that the 2017 drug overdose numbers reported by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clearly show most opioid-related deaths are due to illicit fentanyl and heroin, while deaths due to prescription opioids have stabilized, continuing a steady trend for the past several years. I’ve encouraged using the term “Fentanyl Crisis” rather than “Opioid Crisis” to describe the situation, because it more accurately points to its cause—nonmedical users accessing drugs in the dangerous black market fueled by drug prohibition—hoping thi...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
This study was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health; the National Institute on Drug Abuse; a New Investigator Award from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research; an Early Researcher Award from the Ontario Ministry of Research, Innovation and Science; the UCLA Center for HIV Identification, Prevention and Treatment Services; the UCLA Center for AIDS Research; and the UCLA Clinical Translational Science Institute.
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Implantable technologies have come a long way over the years, and advancements in micro and nanotechnologies have helped device developers continue to push the envelope even further. Within the realm of drug delivery, advances in nanotechnologies have consistently improved patient outcomes by enabling sustained drug delivery to help treat chronic conditions. These scalable technologies have even offered localized drug delivery that can further improve bioavailability. While many of these technologies offer a variety of opportunities, we’re still eagerly awaiting to see the impact of these advancements onc...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: BIOMEDevice San Jose Implants Source Type: news
Prescription opioid use has increased significantly over the past 25 years due to a number of factors including efforts to help patients struggling to cope with pain, overprescribing by providers and marketing by pharmaceutical companies. However, opioids provide euphoria as well as analgesia [1]. This euphoria coupled with iatrogenic physical dependence and addictive qualities has contributed to an epidemic of opioid abuse, addiction and overdose [2]. The increased use of opioids for treating non-cancer chronic pain and the increased use of higher-dose and higher bioavailability formulations has added to what the Centers ...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this review offer clinical insight and reinforce the importance of psychosocial interventions in CNCP and opioid use disorders. However, little empirical data are available to guide practitioners in treating patients with CNCP who misuse opioid medications, and thus future research on integrated approaches, is needed. PMID: 30387858 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Opioid Management - Category: Addiction Tags: J Opioid Manag Source Type: research
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight The MAReport: the Summer/Fall 2018 issue of the MAReport newsletter is now available! This quarter, Executive Director Kate Flewelling wrote about how the National Library of Medicine and National Network of Libraries of Medicine are responding to the opioid crisis, including details on a new class that will be offered for the first time on November 28. National Network of Libraries of Medicine News Funding Applications Due: NNLM MAR has funding available for two grants of $19,000. Libraries, community-based organizations, ...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news
ConclusionsOur current opioid prescription practice for postoperative pain management may exceed what patients need.
Source: International Urogynecology Journal - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
To the medical students, the patient was a conundrum.According to his chart, he had residual pain from a leg injury sustained while working on a train track. Now he wanted an opioid stronger than the Percocet he'd been prescribed. So why did his urine test positive for two other drugs — cocaine and hydromorphone, a powerful opioid that doctors had not ordered?It was up to Clark Yin, 29, to figure out what was really going on with Chris McQ, 58 — as seven other third-year medical students and two instructors watched."How are you going to have a conversation around the patient's positive tox screen r...
Source: Psychology of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs
As we follow the national opioid epidemic, with its greater than five deaths per hour from opioid overdoses, the focus is shifting to methods for limiting an individual’s exposure to these drugs. For most of us, our first contact with these highly addictive medications is after surgery. Studies now reveal that 60 percent of pills prescribed for pain after surgery go unused. These opioids often make their way to other family members, are kept for continued use by the surgical patient to maintain a feeling of euphoria, or even find their way out into the community. Limiting the number of pills and refills prescribed is...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Surgery Source Type: blogs
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