Going beyond prescription pain relievers to understand the opioid epidemic: the role of illicit fentanyl, new psychoactive substances, and street heroin.

The objective of this narrative review is to consider the roles of all substances that contribute to the opioid epidemic in America. PMID: 29190175 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Postgraduate Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Postgrad Med Source Type: research

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Publication date: May–June 2018Source: EXPLORE, Volume 14, Issue 3Author(s): Heather Tick, Arya Nielsen, Kenneth R. Pelletier, Robert Bonakdar, Samantha Simmons, Ronald Glick, Emily Ratner, Russell L. Lemmon, Peter Wayne, Veronica Zador, The Pain Task Force of the Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and HealthABSTRACTMedical pain management is in crisis; from the pervasiveness of pain to inadequate pain treatment, from the escalation of prescription opioids to an epidemic in addiction, diversion and overdose deaths. The rising costs of pain care and managing adverse effects of that care have prompted action ...
Source: EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 August 2017Source: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological PsychiatryAuthor(s): Patrick H. Finan, Bethany Remeniuk, Kelly E. DunnAbstractProblematic prescription opioid use is cited as a primary contributor to the current ‘opioid epidemic’ in the United States, which is characterized by recent rapid increases in individuals seeking treatment for opioid dependence and staggering rates of opioid overdose deaths. Individuals with chronic pain are commonly prescribed opioids to treat pain, and by this mere exposure are at increased risk for the development of problem...
Source: Progress in Neuro Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 February 2018Source: Neuroscience LettersAuthor(s): Marta FilizolaAbstractHaving accidental deaths from opioid overdoses almost quadrupled over the past fifteen years, there is a strong need to develop new, non-addictive medications for chronic pain to stop one of the deadliest epidemics in American history. Given their potentially fewer on-target overdosing risks and other adverse effects compared to classical opioid drugs, attention has recently shifted to opioid allosteric modulators and G protein-biased opioid agonists as likely drug candidates to prevent and/or reverse opioid over...
Source: Neuroscience Letters - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Publication date: May–June 2018Source: EXPLORE, Volume 14, Issue 3Author(s): Heather Tick, Arya Nielsen, Kenneth R. Pelletier, Robert Bonakdar, Samantha Simmons, Ronald Glick, Emily Ratner, Russell L. Lemmon, Peter Wayne, Veronica Zador, The Pain Task Force of the Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and HealthABSTRACTMedical pain management is in crisis; from the pervasiveness of pain to inadequate pain treatment, from the escalation of prescription opioids to an epidemic in addiction, diversion and overdose deaths. The rising costs of pain care and managing adverse effects of that care have prompted action ...
Source: EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 August 2017Source: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological PsychiatryAuthor(s): Patrick H. Finan, Bethany Remeniuk, Kelly E. DunnAbstractProblematic prescription opioid use is cited as a primary contributor to the current ‘opioid epidemic’ in the United States, which is characterized by recent rapid increases in individuals seeking treatment for opioid dependence and staggering rates of opioid overdose deaths. Individuals with chronic pain are commonly prescribed opioids to treat pain, and by this mere exposure are at increased risk for the development of problem...
Source: Progress in Neuro Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 February 2018Source: Neuroscience LettersAuthor(s): Marta FilizolaAbstractHaving accidental deaths from opioid overdoses almost quadrupled over the past fifteen years, there is a strong need to develop new, non-addictive medications for chronic pain to stop one of the deadliest epidemics in American history. Given their potentially fewer on-target overdosing risks and other adverse effects compared to classical opioid drugs, attention has recently shifted to opioid allosteric modulators and G protein-biased opioid agonists as likely drug candidates to prevent and/or reverse opioid over...
Source: Neuroscience Letters - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
I have written previously about the raging opioid epidemic in Ohio.  Attacking and reversing this tidal wave will require many weapons, resources and time.  Opioid addiction is a crafty and elusive adversary that will be difficult to vanquish.  Our battle plan will have to be nimble and adjusted over time, much as military leaders must do in actual armed conflict. Here in Ohio and elsewhere, physicians must abide by new prescribing restrictions.  Prior to prescribing a controlled pain medicine, doctors are required to check the patients OARRS report online, which catalogues the ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs
Efforts to improve treatment of pain using opioids have to adequately take into account their therapeutic shortcomings which involve addictiveness. While there are no signs of an “opioid epidemic” in Germany s...
Source: BMC Family Practice - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
The crushing toll of the opioid crisis is daily news, including stories about ways to “fix” it. A wide array of initiatives has been brought forward in an attempt to curb this epidemic and the damage it causes. Prescription monitoring programs (PMPs) are one of them. The goal of PMPs is a good one — to identify patients who are being prescribed multiple medications by multiple clinicians. It is a means to introduce some stewardship for preventing overuse and misuse of prescription drugs. How prescription monitoring programs work Prescription monitoring programs are state-based electronic databases that pr...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Drugs and Supplements Health Source Type: blogs
A  story in today’s Wall Street Journal discusses the latest report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development on ”prime age” (25-54) labor-force participation rates among its 35 member countries through the last quarter of 2017. While the US rate has improved, it remains below the average OECD rate, lagging behind such developed countries as Japan and the UK. What’s puzzling is why the authors of the report decided to weigh in on the opioid overdose issue.Noting that per capita opioid prescriptions in the US are “significantly higher” than in othe...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
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