Whatever it takes: Fighting for Michael

Michael stood at the top of the hill, staring down at the glittering white snow. The prospect of skiing to the bottom was scary — on previous trips, he’d refused to try, worried that he would fall. But this time was different. He was ready to take a chance. Attempting to balance without using poles, he pushed himself forward and glided through the powder as his family cheered him on. By the end of the day, the 8-year-old had sailed down the slopes five times, all by himself. The accomplishment was even more meaningful for his parents, Bill and Lisa Smith, who have watched him fight to survive — and thrive — since he was an infant. “He had some issues with spitting up and turning blue and was diagnosed with acid reflux when he was about a month old,” says Bill. “But we had suspicions that something else was wrong.” Setting an example Sure enough, three days later, Michael experienced volvulus, a life-threatening disorder in which the intestines twist, cutting off blood supply to the small bowel. As a result, surgeons had to remove about 90 percent of his small intestines, leaving him with a serious condition called short bowel syndrome, which prevents the body from extracting the nutrients it needs to survive. Doctors determined that Michael had also suffered multiple strokes. His physicians referred the family to the Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation (CAIR) at Boston Children’s Hospital. There, Michael underwe...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Dr. Tom Jaksic G-J tube Hale Center for Families short bowel syndrome (SBS). volvulus Source Type: news

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Overkill: When Modern Medicine Goes Too Far by Paul Offit M.D.I am admittedly a huge fanboy of Paul Offit, an infectious disease guru at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, one of the preeminent pediatric hospitals in the world. His latest bookOverall: When Modern Medicine Goes Too Far, is a collection of medical facts that are already known to the well-read individual, but fly in the face of wrongly-held, out-dated, commonly-believed medical concepts. The majority of the incorrect information was previously considered the standard of care, but newer and better science and studies have clearly demonstrated ...
Source: A Pediatrician's Blog - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: blogs
In this study, except for troponin elevation,Gestalt was the best predictor.The article does not specify the QT correction methodWhy is right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) not found in this large study of syncope?  Probably because it is not common enough to be identified in a general syncope study.  Not every high risk factor will be identified in such studies, but it is obvious that RVH is a dangerous condition and that, if identified on ECG, needs further workup.  Why were so few ECG findings predictive?Because most abnormal ECG findings were considered adverse outcomes in their own right and not eva...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Abstract BACKGROUND: Hypertension, one of the most common cardiovascular diseases that can cause coronary disease, stroke, myocardial infarction and sudden death, it is the major contributor to cardiac failure as well as renal insufficiency. OBJECTIVES: As there are many cardio-active pyridazinone-base derivatives in clinical use, therefore, it we aimed to synthesize a new series of pyridazin-3-ones and evaluate their vasorelaxant activity. METHODS: The new series of synthesized compounds were carried out first by synthesis of 6-flouroarylpyridazinones by cyclization of 3-(4-flourobenzoyl) propionic acid...
Source: Medicinal Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Med Chem Source Type: research
It’s not often that a person growing up among the cotton fields of southwest Oklahoma goes on to become a successful manager of global technology companies, but Leland White is not your average person. During his career, he built and managed semiconductor manufacturing plants around the world and provided management consulting services to large corporations and federal agencies. After a successful business career, he retired in Colorado to pursue two passions: downhill skiing and high-performance driving. Referred to by family and friends as “Lee,” he turned 78 last spring. I talked to Lee about the chall...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Health Care Slider Speech-Language Pathology Dysphagia Swallowing Disorders Source Type: blogs
Most people know about the damaging effects that binge drinking can bring to someone’s life. Loss of enjoyment of life, losing family relationships, financial and career struggles, homelessness, and legal consequences are just the tip of the iceberg. However, it can be more difficult to realize the long-term effect of binge drinking on the body, because you cannot always see it. Frequent binge drinking poses many dangerous health risks, and many of them can lead to death. Facts on Long-Term Effect of Binge Drinking on the Body For men, binge drinking is defined as consuming five or more drinks within about two hour...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol dependence alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center binge binge drinking Source Type: blogs
A former resident texted me this ECG, done for epigastric pain in an 18 year old.  The pain resolved immediately with treatment for acid reflux, and in the clinician's opinion was clearly GI in origin, but he wanted to know what the strange waves in the QRS were:See the unusual notching in II, III, aVF, and V2-V4.I had no idea what they were.  They reminded me of theDelayed Activation Wave associated with circumflex acute MI.See this case: https://hqmeded-ecg.blogspot.com/2018/05/is-there-delayed-activation-wave.html.But they are clearly different from this.I put it on Facebook EKG club and this is the ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
By HANS DUVEFELT, MD Medical researchers and their groupies – early adopters, thoughtleaders, those easily influenced or whatever you want to call them – never seem to learn that when you try to outsmart Mother Nature or Our Heavenly Father, whichever appeals more to your world view, you usually get your hand slapped. When I was a resident (1981-1984), I got penalized if I didn’t offer postmenopausal women estrogen-progesterone replacement therapy because it seemed obvious that if women with endogenous estrogen didn’t get many strokes or heart attacks and women without estrogen did, all we nee...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Medical Practice Physicians Primary Care Hans Duvefelt Source Type: blogs
(CNN) — When heartburn or ulcer pain strikes, drugs can target stomach acid to calm bellies and offer relief. But a new study suggests the medications may come with a hive-inducing side effect: allergies. After analyzing health insurance data from more than 8 million people in Austria, researchers found that prescriptions of anti-allergy medications surged in those who were prescribed stomach acid inhibitors, a class of drugs that includes proton-pump inhibitors and H2 blockers. The findings, published Tuesday in the medical journal Nature Communications, suggest that disrupting the stomach’s delicate balance o...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Allergies CNN Heartburn Source Type: news
Backgrounds: Patients with central nervous system injuries present with dysphagia and may require non-oral feeding methods, like percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, nasogastric (NG) tube, or oroesophageal (OE) tube. The prevalence of pneumonia in patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is significantly higher than that in patients without GER. We aimed to determine the most appropriate tube feeding with low risk of GER by comparing the results of 24-hour pH monitoring studies in patients who were administered 2 types of feeding: NG tube and OE tube. Methods: In this pilot study, 6 stroke patients underwent 24-hou...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Trial/Experimental Study Source Type: research
Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also known as Gurvits syndrome, black esophagus, or acute necrotizing esophagitis, is a rare clinical entity and an unusual reason for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. It is typically described in critically ill patients with multiple medical conditions, arising from a combination of ischemic insult to the esophageal mucosa due to low-flow vascular states, corrosive injury caused by reflux of acid and pepsin, and decreased function of the mucosal barrier systems and reparative mechanisms as occurs in malnourished and debilitated physical states. Patients with AEN tend to be older men, as me...
Source: Case Reports in Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
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