Whatever it takes: Fighting for Michael

Michael stood at the top of the hill, staring down at the glittering white snow. The prospect of skiing to the bottom was scary — on previous trips, he’d refused to try, worried that he would fall. But this time was different. He was ready to take a chance. Attempting to balance without using poles, he pushed himself forward and glided through the powder as his family cheered him on. By the end of the day, the 8-year-old had sailed down the slopes five times, all by himself. The accomplishment was even more meaningful for his parents, Bill and Lisa Smith, who have watched him fight to survive — and thrive — since he was an infant. “He had some issues with spitting up and turning blue and was diagnosed with acid reflux when he was about a month old,” says Bill. “But we had suspicions that something else was wrong.” Setting an example Sure enough, three days later, Michael experienced volvulus, a life-threatening disorder in which the intestines twist, cutting off blood supply to the small bowel. As a result, surgeons had to remove about 90 percent of his small intestines, leaving him with a serious condition called short bowel syndrome, which prevents the body from extracting the nutrients it needs to survive. Doctors determined that Michael had also suffered multiple strokes. His physicians referred the family to the Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation (CAIR) at Boston Children’s Hospital. There, Michael underwe...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Dr. Tom Jaksic G-J tube Hale Center for Families short bowel syndrome (SBS). volvulus Source Type: news

Related Links:

(CNN) — When heartburn or ulcer pain strikes, drugs can target stomach acid to calm bellies and offer relief. But a new study suggests the medications may come with a hive-inducing side effect: allergies. After analyzing health insurance data from more than 8 million people in Austria, researchers found that prescriptions of anti-allergy medications surged in those who were prescribed stomach acid inhibitors, a class of drugs that includes proton-pump inhibitors and H2 blockers. The findings, published Tuesday in the medical journal Nature Communications, suggest that disrupting the stomach’s delicate balance o...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Allergies CNN Heartburn Source Type: news
Backgrounds: Patients with central nervous system injuries present with dysphagia and may require non-oral feeding methods, like percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, nasogastric (NG) tube, or oroesophageal (OE) tube. The prevalence of pneumonia in patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is significantly higher than that in patients without GER. We aimed to determine the most appropriate tube feeding with low risk of GER by comparing the results of 24-hour pH monitoring studies in patients who were administered 2 types of feeding: NG tube and OE tube. Methods: In this pilot study, 6 stroke patients underwent 24-hou...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Trial/Experimental Study Source Type: research
Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also known as Gurvits syndrome, black esophagus, or acute necrotizing esophagitis, is a rare clinical entity and an unusual reason for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. It is typically described in critically ill patients with multiple medical conditions, arising from a combination of ischemic insult to the esophageal mucosa due to low-flow vascular states, corrosive injury caused by reflux of acid and pepsin, and decreased function of the mucosal barrier systems and reparative mechanisms as occurs in malnourished and debilitated physical states. Patients with AEN tend to be older men, as me...
Source: Case Reports in Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
A previously healthy, well-appearing 42-year-old female living in a modern, high-rise apartment in downtown Los Angeles calls 9-1-1 at 5:30 am complaining of worsening of a burning, epigastric pain she had been experiencing for the last three days. She reports associated nausea and non-bloody, non-bilious vomiting, and that she couldn’t manage to get comfortable in bed until she finally decided to call for help at daybreak. During her 9-1-1 call, she reports “pain, like heartburn, that just woke me up again and I had to throw up, … and then I was sweating so much.” Using the Los Angeles Tiered Disp...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Exclusive Articles Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news
Very often I encounter women who are far more worried about breast cancer than they are about heart disease. But women have a greater risk of dying from heart disease than from all cancers combined. This is true for women of all races and ethnicities. Yet only about 50% of women realize that they are at greater risk from heart disease than from anything else. Currently in the US, three million women are living with breast cancer, which causes one in 31 deaths. Almost 50 million women have cardiovascular disease, which encompasses heart disease and strokes and causes one in three deaths. Here’s what’s reall...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Breast Cancer Exercise and Fitness Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Background: Personalised therapy for COPD patients is debated. We investigated whether the rate of FEV1 decline differs between patients with and without ICS-containing medications, stratified by blood EOS level.Methods: The UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (primary care records) and Hospital Episode Statistics (hospital records) were used to identify COPD patients with ≥2 FEV1 measurements ≥6 months apart. Follow-up started from first FEV1 until censoring at death, leaving database or first ICS-containing prescription (if not baseline ICS-containing user). The nearest blood EOS 2 years prior to the start of fo...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Purpose of review The present review summarizes the past year's literature, both clinical and basic science, regarding potential adverse effects of proton pump inhibitors. Recent findings Proton pump inhibitors are amongst the most widely prescribed and overprescribed medications worldwide. Although generally considered well tolerated, epidemiologic studies mining large databases have reported a panoply of purported serious adverse effects associated with proton pump inhibitors, including chronic kidney disease, cognitive decline, myocardial infarction, stroke, bone fracture and even death. It should be noted that the...
Source: Current Opinion in Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: STOMACH AND DUODENUM: Edited by Mitchell L. Schubert Source Type: research
You're reading 10 Ways Chronic Stress Is Killing Your Quality Of Life, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Stress is something which is almost unavoidable in modern life. While the right amount of stress motivates individual performance, it is necessary if you could distinguish whether your stress is good or chronic. Chronic stress derives from repeated interaction of the body to intense and stressful situations, contributing to the release of stress hormone. The stress is troublesome when it comes to chronic,...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: depression featured self improvement anxiety bad habits chronic stress Source Type: blogs
This study highlights that, beyond the detrimental effects of tube feeding on quality of life, there could be detrimental effects from non-oral feeding on the health of our patients. This is obviously not the case for all patients, so each individual case needs to be considered, but these studies comparing outcomes are important to consider. Participant: When using the IDDSI (International Dysphagia Diet Standardization Initiative), are there at least two numbers included in a diet order: one for foods and one for liquids? Are dietary departments fully onboard? Rogus-Pulia: My understanding of IDDSI is that, yes,...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Academia & Research Health Care Private Practice Slider Speech-Language Pathology Dysphagia Feeding Disorders nutrition Speech Disorders Swallowing Disorders Source Type: blogs
I hear this comment with some regularity when, for instance, someone recognizes me as the author of the Wheat Belly series. This is a step in the right direction. But saying that you have a wheat intolerance is like saying “I have a tobacco intolerance.” The impact of tobacco smoking on health ranges from mild impairment, to incapacitating diseases such as chronic lung disease and abdominal aortic aneurysms, to death. A rare person escapes the ravages of years of smoking, but most people develop at least one, if not half-a-dozen, health problems from cigarettes. And so it goes with wheat: It’s a rare pers...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten gluten-free grain grain-free grains health Inflammation Source Type: blogs
More News: Acid Reflux | Blogging | Boys | Children | Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease | GERD | Hospitals | Insurance | Insurers | Learning | Nutrition | Pediatrics | Rehabilitation | Sports Medicine | Stroke | Universities & Medical Training